Archive for the ‘Yom HaShoah’ Category

Pentagon’s ‘Yom HaShoah’ ‘Holocaust’ Liturgy and Ritual for 2012

April 23, 2012
To aid in decoding this Synagogue and State fraud I have interspersed comments and links in the text below of the Pentagon’s ‘Yom HaShoah’ ‘Holocaust’ Liturgy which Secretary of ‘Defense,’ Leon Panetta recited at the Pentagon for the ‘Holocaust’ high holy day, ‘Yom HaShoah’ 2012. Panetta was one of the scoundrels who foisted this psychological warfare holy day on the people of the U.S. for the purpose of covering over Allied WWII atrocities against the Christian civilians of Europe and Japan and justifying the massive expenditure in blood and treasure that propped up and continues to prop up the Judaic Imperium. Panetta can be counted upon to wage never ending ‘preemptive’ war to “prevent another ‘Holocaust'” which is always right around every corner of the Greater Counterfeit Israel project.

Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta assists [Counterfeit] Israel’s Defense Minister, Ehud Barak, as they light candles during a Holocaust Remembrance Observance held in the Pentagon Auditorium Thursday, April 19, 2012
Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta piously places his hand over his heart as he listens to the national anthem during a Holocaust Remembrance at the Pentagon, April 19, 2012. Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak, third from right, joined Panetta for the event. 

Yesterday, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta joined Israel’s Defense Minister Ehud Barak in commemorating the victims and survivors of the Holocaust at an event marking Yom HaShoah.


[Excepts from] the Secretary’s remarks are below as Delivered by Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta, The Pentagon Auditorium, Washington D.C., Thursday, April 19, 2012 Holocaust Remembrance Day Observance:

Today we pause to remember and honor six million souls who were murdered not because of anything they had done, but because of who they were. They will always be in our memory, they will always be in our prayers, and they will always be in our hearts.

… Today we also celebrate the enduring strength of the Jewish people, who overcame this tragedy and built a strong and vibrant Jewish state in Israel. They have flourished there, they have flourished here in America, and indeed across the world, and that too is an inspiration to all of us.

In my faith, the resurrection from the dead is fundamental to our hope and to our faith. In the Jewish faith, resurrection from tragedy is fundamental to their hope and to their faith

… I just had the opportunity to meet with my friend [‘Defense’ Minister of Counterfeit Israel] Ehud Barak, and we are deeply honored that he was able to join us here today in this observance

… Ehud, I am proud to be your partner, and I am proud to be your friend, and to work with you in continuing to strengthen the U.S.-Israel defense relationship. It is an honor for me to be able to participate in this event with all of you.

Today the world comes together to mark Yom Ha’Shoah – Holocaust Remembrance Day. It was my privilege to have served in the U.S. House of Representatives when we passed a law recognizing the days surrounding Yom Ha’Shoah as a national civic commemoration, a law that also established the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. I believed it was important then when I cast that vote, and it is important today, to mark these days of remembrance, because through commemorations like this, large and small, within families at home, we send a strong message that we will never forget, and that we will never allow this to happen again. That solemn responsibility is shared by us as human beings, by us as Americans, and by us as men and women of the Department of Defense, who could be asked, when the time comes, to act, to make sure that it never happens again.

For the United States Armed Services, these events are not a distant memory. Our modern military was forged in the crucible of World War II. It was forged in the fight against Nazi tyranny. To defeat Hitler we mobilized all of the strength that we could muster, and in that effort we witnessed many of our finest hours as a military and indeed, as a country.

Today we carry forward the proud legacy of men and women of the United States Army who played a vital role in liberating the camps at Buchenwald, Dora-Mittelbau, Flossenbürg, Dachau, and Mauthausen. American forces not only brought freedom to the survivors of Nazi horrors, they also made sure that in its aftermath the world would know what [is alleged to have] happened.

In the days after Allied forces captured the first concentration camps, General Eisenhower, General Patton and General Bradley themselves inspected a camp [that had previously been prepared by the U.S. OSS (the predecessor to the CIA) as a psychological warfare operation], and learned and saw [staged ‘evidence’ of] atrocities that had [been intended to appear as though they had] occurred. They were, in Eisenhower’s words, atrocities “beyond the American mind to comprehend” [but not beyond the the OSS’s imagination to dream up]. Eisenhower ordered every American soldier in the area who was not on the front lines to take the time to tour these [psychological warfare operations the OSS had set up in the] camps, so that they could themselves see what they were [alleged to have been] fighting against, and why they were [alleged to be] fighting. These soldiers became not only liberators, but witnesses to [what is alleged to be] one of the greatest atrocities in history [the purpose of the psychological warfare operation. German civilians were also forced to ‘witness’ the displays of ‘atrocities’ staged by the OSS].

The commitment of our forces to the survivors of Nazi atrocities did not end with liberation.  In the aftermath of war, we cared for survivors and we helped reunite families.  We provided physical nourishment, and we provided spiritual nourishment as well.

For example, upon [hearing the Yiddish tall tale that] there was not a single complete edition of the Talmud in Germany General Joseph McNarney, commander of the American zone of Occupied Germany, undertook an effort to print a Talmud for survivors [Hitler was more hostile to the Bible than the Talmud. He did in fact allow printing of the Talmud. Moreover, he did not print Johannes Eisenmenger’s devastating, unsurpassed critique of Judaism].

And when American forces discovered enormous caches of looted cultural materials, they set about ensuring that these objects were treated with the greatest respect.

Ultimately, thanks to these efforts, millions of objects and sacred texts were returned to their rightful heirs or held in trust by Jewish successor organizations.

The leader of that effort, a U.S. Army Captain named Seymour Pomrenze, was a hero whose actions embodied the professionalism and dedication of the uniform he wore.

The contributions of American service members like Captain Pomrenze make all of us proud, and we remember them as we come together as a community today to mark Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Though we will always know what good was done and that lives were saved, we must always remember that we were unable to save the six million Jews who perished under Hitler’s cruel reign.

That is a burden that all of us must carry.  Not just the generation of World War II, but every generation must carry that burden.  It is one that we have turned into shared determination, a shared determination to ensure that this never happens again.

Today we renew that commitment.  That is what this day is truly all about.  We do so by coming together to bear witness, just as our service members did more than sixty-five years ago.  In a moment, we will be privileged to hear from Charlene Schiff, who has dedicated her life to making sure that the lives of those who perished in the Holocaust are never forgotten.

Charlene, it is our honor to be witnesses to your story.  And it is our honor to affirm to you that we will never stop fighting in the memory of those who perished – fighting for a better future, and fighting for a world safe from aggression, from tyranny and from injustice.

Out of the darkness that was the Holocaust comes the eternal hope that never again, never again, will we allow that to happen.  I would now like to invite Minister Barak and the Service Secretaries to join me and Charlene in lighting memorial candles.

These candles symbolize unity and hope, and our shared commitment to honor the memory of all those who perished in the Holocaust.


http://www.defense.gov/speeches/speech.aspx?speechid=1664

also see:

“I hate all Iranians,” Judaic Pentagon Official tells MPs

At Auschwitz, Future U.S. Military Leaders Learn to Hate

‘Anti’-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith Enforces Exclusive Proprietary Claim to Persecution

April 19, 2012
This is not really news; just, as usual, the ‘Anti’-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith wielding its leverage with the media, law enforcement, churches and academia to defame, intimidate, marginalize and generally punish, anyone who in its hyper-paranoid perception appears to violate its ridiculous exclusive proprietary claim to victimhood functioning as a distraction from disproportionate Judaic power, wealth and influence. Just another day in the talmudized West.


Anti-Defamation League takes issue with bishop’s remarks

"Yom HaShoah" Liturgy for Catholic Children

February 2, 2011


Teaching the Holocaust: Commemoration in the Classroom: Liturgy for Christian Schools

Collected by members of the Seattle Archdiocese

Cardinal O’Malley Participates in "Yom HaShoah" Liturgy

April 26, 2009

http://www.necn.com/avp27.swf?Lm).mv1)U)~Sl$RrhclFyuy1:oWzks$y0Dlj8bssH28C#nVZA-pofl3W&!3bv16,owzS'-P?r69XQSF/H0X:-6$wr2XyLTQ7tFbj2-;Y,5NVCB~-Pg35Ceb0#toGjn)q5esgn)cRW5PR(jXO|*nYef(T174N;NijmTKCH110rg0D@,kXlpdM_.OfH,,ZqaY9k4pYP2##k;usWrmNdx_limow|Bq'0OpJ'f1SIadV-g(RP116

Cardinal O’Malley Participates in "Yom HaShoah" Liturgy

April 26, 2009

Portland Archdiocese Observes Noahide Holy Week

April 9, 2009

Holocaustolatry has its Holy Week which centers around its version of Good Friday called “Yom Hashoah.” The Archdiocese of Portland will be in observance.

Communities unite for Holocaust memorial

Catholic Sentinel

April 9, 2009

The Archdiocese of Portland is collaborating with Portland’s Jewish community this month to host a Holocaust Memorial Day observance.

The opening of a week-long Yom Hashoah observance will be held at by Portland Center Stage in Northwest Portland, April 20 at 7 p.m.

In keeping with annual tradition, Holocaust survivors will be on hand for the lighting of candles of remembrance.

The keynote address will be given by Archbishop John Vlazny, followed by “Through My Mother’s Eyes,” a program of the poetry and remembrances of Holocaust survivor Alice Lok Cahana presented by Rabbi Michael Cahana of Congregation Beth Israel and Cantor Ida Rae Cahana with Yiddish art songs. Rabbi Cahana is the artist’s son.

The archbishop will be introduced by Rabbi Emanuel Rose, a leading expert on Catholic-Jewish relations and the reforms of the Second Vatican Council.

The Yom Hashoah observance is a week-long affair, and begins prior to the Yom Hashoah memorial …

Jewish communities around the world adopted Yom Hashoah, or the Holocaust Remembrance Day, after it became a national holiday in Israel in 1951 …

full article:

http://www.sentinel.org/node/9949

Portland Archdiocese Observes Noahide Holy Week

April 9, 2009

Holocaustolatry has its Holy Week which centers around its version of Good Friday called “Yom Hashoah.” The Archdiocese of Portland will be in observance.

Communities unite for Holocaust memorial

Catholic Sentinel

April 9, 2009

The Archdiocese of Portland is collaborating with Portland’s Jewish community this month to host a Holocaust Memorial Day observance.

The opening of a week-long Yom Hashoah observance will be held at by Portland Center Stage in Northwest Portland, April 20 at 7 p.m.

In keeping with annual tradition, Holocaust survivors will be on hand for the lighting of candles of remembrance.

The keynote address will be given by Archbishop John Vlazny, followed by “Through My Mother’s Eyes,” a program of the poetry and remembrances of Holocaust survivor Alice Lok Cahana presented by Rabbi Michael Cahana of Congregation Beth Israel and Cantor Ida Rae Cahana with Yiddish art songs. Rabbi Cahana is the artist’s son.

The archbishop will be introduced by Rabbi Emanuel Rose, a leading expert on Catholic-Jewish relations and the reforms of the Second Vatican Council.

The Yom Hashoah observance is a week-long affair, and begins prior to the Yom Hashoah memorial …

Jewish communities around the world adopted Yom Hashoah, or the Holocaust Remembrance Day, after it became a national holiday in Israel in 1951 …

full article:

http://www.sentinel.org/node/9949

Cardinals Kasper, O’Malley Enshrine "Holocaust" in Boston

March 25, 2009
“No Holocaust denial — which is a new injustice to the victims — can be allowed or permitted … “It’s absolutely clear that a Holocaust denier can’t have a room, a space in the Catholic church,””


Top Vatican liaison to Jews rededicates Massachusetts menorah in memory of Holocaust victims

March 25, 2009

Michael Paulson – Boston Globe

BRAINTREE _ With a touch of flickering flame to the top of a bronze candelabrum, a key Vatican official today sought to reassure the Jewish community that there is no room in the Catholic church for anti-Semitism or Holocaust denial.

Cardinal Walter Kasper, who is Pope Benedict XVI’s top advisor on Catholic-Jewish relations, yesterday visited the headquarters of the Archdiocese of Boston and took several steps to calm the controversy that has erupted since the pope lifted the excommunication of four traditionalist bishops, one of whom denies that the Nazis used gas chambers to kill Jews. Over a salmon lunch with 50 Jewish community leaders, Kasper fielded a series of tough questions about the Vatican’s actions; he then joined a ceremony to rededicate a Holocaust memorial, originally located at the former archdiocesan headquarters in Brighton, which depicts six men and women holding torches to represent the six million Jews killed during World War II.

“The memory of what happened, now 65 years ago, can not be forgotten,” Kasper told a crowd of about 200 at the rededication ceremony, including multiple priests and rabbis, several Holocaust survivors, and the consuls-general of Israel and Germany. “No Holocaust denial — which is a new injustice to the victims — can be allowed or permitted.”

But the raw emotions exposed by the controversy over Bishop Richard Williamson of the Society of St. Pius X were clear. Israel Arbeiter, the president of the Boston chapter of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, recounted the deaths of his parents and brother in concentration camps, and his own witnessing of the remains of Jews killed in gas chambers at Auschwitz-Birkenau, before addressing Kasper and saying, “Your Eminence, pain and suffering have been inflicted again on the Holocaust survivors by a representative of the church, namely, Bishop Williamson, and by the action and inaction by Pope Benedict XVI.”

Arbeiter also praised the Catholic church, calling the visit of Kasper “deeply meaningful,” referring to Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley of Boston as a friend, and saying that the pope has taken a number of constructive steps in recent weeks to address the controversy. But he said he would like to hear the pope directly refute the claim by Williamson that gas chambers were not used by the Nazis.

“Sixty-nine years after the liberation of Auschwitz, with all the available documentation, confirmation by the German government, testimony by the perpetrators, Bishop Williamson still denies the truth, the fact of the Holocaust,” he said. “…I will never understand that he denies that there were ever gas chambers, that Jewish people were gassed and murdered…I wonder whether Bishop Williamson knows where my parents and my brother are.”

Local Jewish and Catholic community leaders said they viewed Kasper’s visit as a significant development, in that it affirmed the high priority the Vatican places on Catholic-Jewish relations.

“Words are helpful, but actions like today’s re-dedication are more powerful, more meaningful, and more enduring,” said Derrek L. Shulman, New England regional director of the Anti-Defamation League. “We welcome and celebrate this day as a major step forward for strengthening relations between Jews and Catholics in the Boston area.”

O’Malley, who organized the event, called the Holocaust “the greatest act of inhumanity ever perpetrated on this planet,” and said yesterday’s event was intended “to assure the entire community of the Holy Father and the church’s commitment to furthering these wonderful relationships that have been cultivated the last decades.” O’Malley noted that Catholic-Jewish relations in Boston have been strong since the days of Cardinal Richard J. Cushing, who in the 1960s helped draft a pivotal document at the Second Vatican Council that repudiated the basis for Christian anti-Semitism.

Kasper said that the outcry from Catholics irate over Williamson’s remarks, and over the Vatican’s action, was evidence that Catholics have internalized the importance of Catholic-Jewish relations. And Nancy K. Kaufman, the executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council, said that the response to the uproar had provided evidence of the overall strength of the Jewish-Catholic relationship, noting the speed and candor with which local leaders had been able to meet and talk.

“It speaks to the power of the relationship that we have worked on so hard in this community over 40 or 50 years,” Kaufman said. “Some of us here today can remember a time when relations between Catholics and Jews in Boston were not so good, and we didn’t have the ability to have an honest and open dialogue among and between each other, and I think the ability to raise difficult issues like this one, and to have the discussion…speaks to the strength of the relationship.”

http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles_of_faith/2009/03/kasper_in_brain.html

Top Vatican liaison to Jews rededicates Massachusetts menorah in memory of Holocaust victims

JAY LINDSAY – Associated Press – BRAINTREE, Mass.

March 25, 2009

… Cardinal Walter Kasper joined Holocaust survivors and local Roman Catholic leaders at the ceremony for the Yom Hashoah Menorah at the Boston Archdiocese’s Braintree offices.

Kasper said the ceremony was a reminder of “the most atrocious event of the last century.”

“No Holocaust denial, which is a new injustice to the victims, can be allowed or permitted,” Kasper said. “The memory must be a … memory for the future we hand down to future generations.”

The menorah was dedicated in 2002 at the archdiocese’s former campus in Brighton, but the archdiocese recently moved to Braintree after selling its land to neighboring Boston College to relieve debt. Cardinal Sean O’Malley, the Boston archbishop, suggested the rededication ceremony in Braintree after meeting with local Jewish leaders angered by the Vatican’s January decision to lift the excommunication of Bishop Richard Williamson …

At a press conference after the ceremony, Kasper emphasized that though Williamson’s excommunication was lifted, he can’t be fully restored into the church unless he renounces his views.

“It’s absolutely clear that a Holocaust denier can’t have a room, a space in the Catholic church,” Kasper said …

Auschwitz survivor Israel Arbeiter on Wednesday called on the pope to emphatically state that millions of people died in gas chambers. Arbeiter said that his parents were murdered in the chambers in the Treblinka death camp and that he saw thousands led into Auschwitz’s chambers, leaving behind “only their clothing, their ashes and crushed bones.”

“We stand together against those who today conspire to repeat history even as they deny that very history,” said Arbeiter, president of the Boston area chapter of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors.

Arbeiter was joined by his son and grandson as he lit one of six candles on the menorah, representing the 6 million Jews who perished in the Holocaust.

The menorah depicts six people holding torches on a base of a cracked Star of David. A holy man with a prayer book stands in front of them, with a child to the side.

The original Yom Hashoah Menorah was placed at the North American College in Vatican City in 1999. At the time, Pope John Paul II backed a proposal to place replicas of these menorahs in Catholic centers as a sign of reconciliation and to spur Holocaust study programs.

The menorahs have since been placed in cities around the country, including Dallas, Miami and Baltimore.

http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/event/apArticle/id/D975ADOG0/

See also:

Xavier University Gets Even More Kosher

Bishop Rhoades Observed “Yom HaShoah”

Vatican to Move Rabbinic Subversion Beyond the Clergy and Into the Pews

Cardinals Kasper, O’Malley Enshrine "Holocaust" in Boston

March 25, 2009
“No Holocaust denial — which is a new injustice to the victims — can be allowed or permitted … “It’s absolutely clear that a Holocaust denier can’t have a room, a space in the Catholic church,””


Top Vatican liaison to Jews rededicates Massachusetts menorah in memory of Holocaust victims

March 25, 2009

Michael Paulson – Boston Globe

BRAINTREE _ With a touch of flickering flame to the top of a bronze candelabrum, a key Vatican official today sought to reassure the Jewish community that there is no room in the Catholic church for anti-Semitism or Holocaust denial.

Cardinal Walter Kasper, who is Pope Benedict XVI’s top advisor on Catholic-Jewish relations, yesterday visited the headquarters of the Archdiocese of Boston and took several steps to calm the controversy that has erupted since the pope lifted the excommunication of four traditionalist bishops, one of whom denies that the Nazis used gas chambers to kill Jews. Over a salmon lunch with 50 Jewish community leaders, Kasper fielded a series of tough questions about the Vatican’s actions; he then joined a ceremony to rededicate a Holocaust memorial, originally located at the former archdiocesan headquarters in Brighton, which depicts six men and women holding torches to represent the six million Jews killed during World War II.

“The memory of what happened, now 65 years ago, can not be forgotten,” Kasper told a crowd of about 200 at the rededication ceremony, including multiple priests and rabbis, several Holocaust survivors, and the consuls-general of Israel and Germany. “No Holocaust denial — which is a new injustice to the victims — can be allowed or permitted.”

But the raw emotions exposed by the controversy over Bishop Richard Williamson of the Society of St. Pius X were clear. Israel Arbeiter, the president of the Boston chapter of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, recounted the deaths of his parents and brother in concentration camps, and his own witnessing of the remains of Jews killed in gas chambers at Auschwitz-Birkenau, before addressing Kasper and saying, “Your Eminence, pain and suffering have been inflicted again on the Holocaust survivors by a representative of the church, namely, Bishop Williamson, and by the action and inaction by Pope Benedict XVI.”

Arbeiter also praised the Catholic church, calling the visit of Kasper “deeply meaningful,” referring to Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley of Boston as a friend, and saying that the pope has taken a number of constructive steps in recent weeks to address the controversy. But he said he would like to hear the pope directly refute the claim by Williamson that gas chambers were not used by the Nazis.

“Sixty-nine years after the liberation of Auschwitz, with all the available documentation, confirmation by the German government, testimony by the perpetrators, Bishop Williamson still denies the truth, the fact of the Holocaust,” he said. “…I will never understand that he denies that there were ever gas chambers, that Jewish people were gassed and murdered…I wonder whether Bishop Williamson knows where my parents and my brother are.”

Local Jewish and Catholic community leaders said they viewed Kasper’s visit as a significant development, in that it affirmed the high priority the Vatican places on Catholic-Jewish relations.

“Words are helpful, but actions like today’s re-dedication are more powerful, more meaningful, and more enduring,” said Derrek L. Shulman, New England regional director of the Anti-Defamation League. “We welcome and celebrate this day as a major step forward for strengthening relations between Jews and Catholics in the Boston area.”

O’Malley, who organized the event, called the Holocaust “the greatest act of inhumanity ever perpetrated on this planet,” and said yesterday’s event was intended “to assure the entire community of the Holy Father and the church’s commitment to furthering these wonderful relationships that have been cultivated the last decades.” O’Malley noted that Catholic-Jewish relations in Boston have been strong since the days of Cardinal Richard J. Cushing, who in the 1960s helped draft a pivotal document at the Second Vatican Council that repudiated the basis for Christian anti-Semitism.

Kasper said that the outcry from Catholics irate over Williamson’s remarks, and over the Vatican’s action, was evidence that Catholics have internalized the importance of Catholic-Jewish relations. And Nancy K. Kaufman, the executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council, said that the response to the uproar had provided evidence of the overall strength of the Jewish-Catholic relationship, noting the speed and candor with which local leaders had been able to meet and talk.

“It speaks to the power of the relationship that we have worked on so hard in this community over 40 or 50 years,” Kaufman said. “Some of us here today can remember a time when relations between Catholics and Jews in Boston were not so good, and we didn’t have the ability to have an honest and open dialogue among and between each other, and I think the ability to raise difficult issues like this one, and to have the discussion…speaks to the strength of the relationship.”

http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles_of_faith/2009/03/kasper_in_brain.html

Top Vatican liaison to Jews rededicates Massachusetts menorah in memory of Holocaust victims

JAY LINDSAY – Associated Press – BRAINTREE, Mass.

March 25, 2009

… Cardinal Walter Kasper joined Holocaust survivors and local Roman Catholic leaders at the ceremony for the Yom Hashoah Menorah at the Boston Archdiocese’s Braintree offices.

Kasper said the ceremony was a reminder of “the most atrocious event of the last century.”

“No Holocaust denial, which is a new injustice to the victims, can be allowed or permitted,” Kasper said. “The memory must be a … memory for the future we hand down to future generations.”

The menorah was dedicated in 2002 at the archdiocese’s former campus in Brighton, but the archdiocese recently moved to Braintree after selling its land to neighboring Boston College to relieve debt. Cardinal Sean O’Malley, the Boston archbishop, suggested the rededication ceremony in Braintree after meeting with local Jewish leaders angered by the Vatican’s January decision to lift the excommunication of Bishop Richard Williamson …

At a press conference after the ceremony, Kasper emphasized that though Williamson’s excommunication was lifted, he can’t be fully restored into the church unless he renounces his views.

“It’s absolutely clear that a Holocaust denier can’t have a room, a space in the Catholic church,” Kasper said …

Auschwitz survivor Israel Arbeiter on Wednesday called on the pope to emphatically state that millions of people died in gas chambers. Arbeiter said that his parents were murdered in the chambers in the Treblinka death camp and that he saw thousands led into Auschwitz’s chambers, leaving behind “only their clothing, their ashes and crushed bones.”

“We stand together against those who today conspire to repeat history even as they deny that very history,” said Arbeiter, president of the Boston area chapter of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors.

Arbeiter was joined by his son and grandson as he lit one of six candles on the menorah, representing the 6 million Jews who perished in the Holocaust.

The menorah depicts six people holding torches on a base of a cracked Star of David. A holy man with a prayer book stands in front of them, with a child to the side.

The original Yom Hashoah Menorah was placed at the North American College in Vatican City in 1999. At the time, Pope John Paul II backed a proposal to place replicas of these menorahs in Catholic centers as a sign of reconciliation and to spur Holocaust study programs.

The menorahs have since been placed in cities around the country, including Dallas, Miami and Baltimore.

http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/event/apArticle/id/D975ADOG0/

See also:

Xavier University Gets Even More Kosher

Bishop Rhoades Observed “Yom HaShoah”

Vatican to Move Rabbinic Subversion Beyond the Clergy and Into the Pews

Cardinals Kasper, O’Malley Enshrine "Holocaust" in Boston

March 25, 2009
“No Holocaust denial — which is a new injustice to the victims — can be allowed or permitted … “It’s absolutely clear that a Holocaust denier can’t have a room, a space in the Catholic church,””


Top Vatican liaison to Jews rededicates Massachusetts menorah in memory of Holocaust victims

March 25, 2009

Michael Paulson – Boston Globe

BRAINTREE _ With a touch of flickering flame to the top of a bronze candelabrum, a key Vatican official today sought to reassure the Jewish community that there is no room in the Catholic church for anti-Semitism or Holocaust denial.

Cardinal Walter Kasper, who is Pope Benedict XVI’s top advisor on Catholic-Jewish relations, yesterday visited the headquarters of the Archdiocese of Boston and took several steps to calm the controversy that has erupted since the pope lifted the excommunication of four traditionalist bishops, one of whom denies that the Nazis used gas chambers to kill Jews. Over a salmon lunch with 50 Jewish community leaders, Kasper fielded a series of tough questions about the Vatican’s actions; he then joined a ceremony to rededicate a Holocaust memorial, originally located at the former archdiocesan headquarters in Brighton, which depicts six men and women holding torches to represent the six million Jews killed during World War II.

“The memory of what happened, now 65 years ago, can not be forgotten,” Kasper told a crowd of about 200 at the rededication ceremony, including multiple priests and rabbis, several Holocaust survivors, and the consuls-general of Israel and Germany. “No Holocaust denial — which is a new injustice to the victims — can be allowed or permitted.”

But the raw emotions exposed by the controversy over Bishop Richard Williamson of the Society of St. Pius X were clear. Israel Arbeiter, the president of the Boston chapter of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, recounted the deaths of his parents and brother in concentration camps, and his own witnessing of the remains of Jews killed in gas chambers at Auschwitz-Birkenau, before addressing Kasper and saying, “Your Eminence, pain and suffering have been inflicted again on the Holocaust survivors by a representative of the church, namely, Bishop Williamson, and by the action and inaction by Pope Benedict XVI.”

Arbeiter also praised the Catholic church, calling the visit of Kasper “deeply meaningful,” referring to Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley of Boston as a friend, and saying that the pope has taken a number of constructive steps in recent weeks to address the controversy. But he said he would like to hear the pope directly refute the claim by Williamson that gas chambers were not used by the Nazis.

“Sixty-nine years after the liberation of Auschwitz, with all the available documentation, confirmation by the German government, testimony by the perpetrators, Bishop Williamson still denies the truth, the fact of the Holocaust,” he said. “…I will never understand that he denies that there were ever gas chambers, that Jewish people were gassed and murdered…I wonder whether Bishop Williamson knows where my parents and my brother are.”

Local Jewish and Catholic community leaders said they viewed Kasper’s visit as a significant development, in that it affirmed the high priority the Vatican places on Catholic-Jewish relations.

“Words are helpful, but actions like today’s re-dedication are more powerful, more meaningful, and more enduring,” said Derrek L. Shulman, New England regional director of the Anti-Defamation League. “We welcome and celebrate this day as a major step forward for strengthening relations between Jews and Catholics in the Boston area.”

O’Malley, who organized the event, called the Holocaust “the greatest act of inhumanity ever perpetrated on this planet,” and said yesterday’s event was intended “to assure the entire community of the Holy Father and the church’s commitment to furthering these wonderful relationships that have been cultivated the last decades.” O’Malley noted that Catholic-Jewish relations in Boston have been strong since the days of Cardinal Richard J. Cushing, who in the 1960s helped draft a pivotal document at the Second Vatican Council that repudiated the basis for Christian anti-Semitism.

Kasper said that the outcry from Catholics irate over Williamson’s remarks, and over the Vatican’s action, was evidence that Catholics have internalized the importance of Catholic-Jewish relations. And Nancy K. Kaufman, the executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council, said that the response to the uproar had provided evidence of the overall strength of the Jewish-Catholic relationship, noting the speed and candor with which local leaders had been able to meet and talk.

“It speaks to the power of the relationship that we have worked on so hard in this community over 40 or 50 years,” Kaufman said. “Some of us here today can remember a time when relations between Catholics and Jews in Boston were not so good, and we didn’t have the ability to have an honest and open dialogue among and between each other, and I think the ability to raise difficult issues like this one, and to have the discussion…speaks to the strength of the relationship.”

http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles_of_faith/2009/03/kasper_in_brain.html

Top Vatican liaison to Jews rededicates Massachusetts menorah in memory of Holocaust victims

JAY LINDSAY – Associated Press – BRAINTREE, Mass.

March 25, 2009

… Cardinal Walter Kasper joined Holocaust survivors and local Roman Catholic leaders at the ceremony for the Yom Hashoah Menorah at the Boston Archdiocese’s Braintree offices.

Kasper said the ceremony was a reminder of “the most atrocious event of the last century.”

“No Holocaust denial, which is a new injustice to the victims, can be allowed or permitted,” Kasper said. “The memory must be a … memory for the future we hand down to future generations.”

The menorah was dedicated in 2002 at the archdiocese’s former campus in Brighton, but the archdiocese recently moved to Braintree after selling its land to neighboring Boston College to relieve debt. Cardinal Sean O’Malley, the Boston archbishop, suggested the rededication ceremony in Braintree after meeting with local Jewish leaders angered by the Vatican’s January decision to lift the excommunication of Bishop Richard Williamson …

At a press conference after the ceremony, Kasper emphasized that though Williamson’s excommunication was lifted, he can’t be fully restored into the church unless he renounces his views.

“It’s absolutely clear that a Holocaust denier can’t have a room, a space in the Catholic church,” Kasper said …

Auschwitz survivor Israel Arbeiter on Wednesday called on the pope to emphatically state that millions of people died in gas chambers. Arbeiter said that his parents were murdered in the chambers in the Treblinka death camp and that he saw thousands led into Auschwitz’s chambers, leaving behind “only their clothing, their ashes and crushed bones.”

“We stand together against those who today conspire to repeat history even as they deny that very history,” said Arbeiter, president of the Boston area chapter of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors.

Arbeiter was joined by his son and grandson as he lit one of six candles on the menorah, representing the 6 million Jews who perished in the Holocaust.

The menorah depicts six people holding torches on a base of a cracked Star of David. A holy man with a prayer book stands in front of them, with a child to the side.

The original Yom Hashoah Menorah was placed at the North American College in Vatican City in 1999. At the time, Pope John Paul II backed a proposal to place replicas of these menorahs in Catholic centers as a sign of reconciliation and to spur Holocaust study programs.

The menorahs have since been placed in cities around the country, including Dallas, Miami and Baltimore.

http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/event/apArticle/id/D975ADOG0/

See also:

Xavier University Gets Even More Kosher

Bishop Rhoades Observed “Yom HaShoah”

Vatican to Move Rabbinic Subversion Beyond the Clergy and Into the Pews