Archive for the ‘Witchcraft’ Category

Archaeologists Unearth Human Skulls Used in Talmudic Era Judaic Rituals

April 13, 2009

“Newly published archaeological evidence attests to the fact that ancient Jews used human skulls in ceremonies, despite a strict Halakhic prohibition on touching human remains.”

Ah, yes. But according to the same halacha, non-Judaic corpses do not defile: “R. Simeon b. Yohai said: The graves of Gentiles do not defile, for it is written, And ye my flock, the flock of my pastures, are men; only ye are designated ‘men.’”(Babylonian Talmud, Bava Metzia 114b, Soncino Edition). Nice try at absolving the rabbis of this witchcraft.

‘Ancient Jews used skulls in ceremonies despite ban’

April 13, 2009

Ofri Ilani – Haaretz

Newly published archaeological evidence attests to the fact that ancient Jews used human skulls in ceremonies, despite a strict Halakhic prohibition on touching human remains.

British researcher Dan Levene from the University of Southampton published findings in Biblical Archaeological Review about the human skulls, known as incantation bowls, some of which bear inscriptions in Aramaic.

The skulls were unearthed in present-day Iraq (formerly Babylonia) and are believed to have been used during the Talmudic era. At least one of them appears to be that of an anonymous woman.

“When I presented these findings in Israel, people told me, ‘It is not possible that this is Jewish,'” said Levene. “But it is certainly Jewish.”

Levene added that, despite going against conventional wisdom, the talisman was likely used by someone desperate, and that there have been past cases of skulls being used to ward off increased ghosts or demons.

“The fact remains that belief in demons was widespread at this time among Jews as well as other peoples,” writes Levene. “Incantation bowls are known not only from Jewish communities but from other communities as well.”

To combat demons – who cause medical problems as well as other mishaps and ills – people invoked numerous magic rites and formulas.

http://haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1078227.html

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Archaeologists Unearth Human Skulls Used in Talmudic Era Judaic Rituals

April 13, 2009

“Newly published archaeological evidence attests to the fact that ancient Jews used human skulls in ceremonies, despite a strict Halakhic prohibition on touching human remains.”

Ah, yes. But according to the same halacha, non-Judaic corpses do not defile: “R. Simeon b. Yohai said: The graves of Gentiles do not defile, for it is written, And ye my flock, the flock of my pastures, are men; only ye are designated ‘men.’”(Babylonian Talmud, Bava Metzia 114b, Soncino Edition). Nice try at absolving the rabbis of this witchcraft.

‘Ancient Jews used skulls in ceremonies despite ban’

April 13, 2009

Ofri Ilani – Haaretz

Newly published archaeological evidence attests to the fact that ancient Jews used human skulls in ceremonies, despite a strict Halakhic prohibition on touching human remains.

British researcher Dan Levene from the University of Southampton published findings in Biblical Archaeological Review about the human skulls, known as incantation bowls, some of which bear inscriptions in Aramaic.

The skulls were unearthed in present-day Iraq (formerly Babylonia) and are believed to have been used during the Talmudic era. At least one of them appears to be that of an anonymous woman.

“When I presented these findings in Israel, people told me, ‘It is not possible that this is Jewish,'” said Levene. “But it is certainly Jewish.”

Levene added that, despite going against conventional wisdom, the talisman was likely used by someone desperate, and that there have been past cases of skulls being used to ward off increased ghosts or demons.

“The fact remains that belief in demons was widespread at this time among Jews as well as other peoples,” writes Levene. “Incantation bowls are known not only from Jewish communities but from other communities as well.”

To combat demons – who cause medical problems as well as other mishaps and ills – people invoked numerous magic rites and formulas.

http://haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1078227.html

Reform Congregation Nostalgic for Genocidal Racist Texts

October 31, 2007

The genocidal racial supremacism, pantheism, self-worship, sex magic, witchcraft, etc., of Kabbalah is making a comeback among Benedict’s elder brothers of the Reformed persuasion who previously distanced themselves from some of the dark elements of Orthodox Judaism.

Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz signs a copy of Opening Tanya, one of the 60 books he has authored, for Rabbi Claudio Kogan of Anshe Emeth Memorial Temple in New Brunswick

Scholars take separate paths into the mystic

by Debra Rubin
NJJN Bureau Chief/Middlesex
10.30.07

Rabbis from Orthodox and Reform backgrounds brought their insights into Jewish mysticism to a New Brunswick synagogue this month.

And while they may have started from very different places, they both arrived at a destination where those looking to rise above the material and ordinary could find resources in Jewish tradition.

Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz, the noted Israeli scholar perhaps best known for his translation of the Talmud into modern Hebrew and English, spoke Oct. 17 at Anshe Emeth Memorial Temple in New Brunswick on How To Live a Spiritual Life in a Materialistic Time.

Rabbi Lawrence Kushner, author of a series of influential books on Jewish mysticism and spirituality, spoke Oct. 22 on Kabbalah: A Reform Approach, reading passages from his book Kabbalah: A Love Story …

… “Real Kabala is when you use your study of Kabala to heal the divine,” said Kushner, the scholar-in-residence at Congregation Emanu-El of San Francisco and visiting professor of Jewish spirituality at the Graduate Theological University in Berkeley …

Those who for centuries performed mitzvot only for the sake of performing a mitzvot were, in essence, acting as “God”s chiropractors,” and expecting God to reply, “Thanks, I needed that,” he said.

Kushner said the practice of continually dissecting and “recreating ourselves” through the study of sacred texts is “an enterprise unique to Judaism.”

The master text of Kabala is the Zohar, a book once so revered that “for 400 years more Jews could quote Zohar than Talmud,” said Kushner.

Kabala, with its mystical overtones, bears a similarity to Eastern theology with its emphasis on the feminine dimension of the divine and infusion of divine presence into everyday events.

The erotic yearning that can be found on the Zohar”s pages, explained Kushner, can be interpreted as: “It makes me happier to do what my lover wants than what I want. In loving someone else, we have a heightened sense of self.”

Like Kushner, Steinsaltz also drew a connection between human action and divine reaction.

“Life is identical with the divine,” he said …

http://www.njjewishnews.com/njjn.com/110107/sxScholarsTakeSeparate.html

Reform Congregation Nostalgic for Genocidal Racist Texts

October 31, 2007

The genocidal racial supremacism, pantheism, self-worship, sex magic, witchcraft, etc., of Kabbalah is making a comeback among Benedict’s elder brothers of the Reformed persuasion who previously distanced themselves from some of the dark elements of Orthodox Judaism.

Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz signs a copy of Opening Tanya, one of the 60 books he has authored, for Rabbi Claudio Kogan of Anshe Emeth Memorial Temple in New Brunswick

Scholars take separate paths into the mystic

by Debra Rubin
NJJN Bureau Chief/Middlesex
10.30.07

Rabbis from Orthodox and Reform backgrounds brought their insights into Jewish mysticism to a New Brunswick synagogue this month.

And while they may have started from very different places, they both arrived at a destination where those looking to rise above the material and ordinary could find resources in Jewish tradition.

Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz, the noted Israeli scholar perhaps best known for his translation of the Talmud into modern Hebrew and English, spoke Oct. 17 at Anshe Emeth Memorial Temple in New Brunswick on How To Live a Spiritual Life in a Materialistic Time.

Rabbi Lawrence Kushner, author of a series of influential books on Jewish mysticism and spirituality, spoke Oct. 22 on Kabbalah: A Reform Approach, reading passages from his book Kabbalah: A Love Story …

… “Real Kabala is when you use your study of Kabala to heal the divine,” said Kushner, the scholar-in-residence at Congregation Emanu-El of San Francisco and visiting professor of Jewish spirituality at the Graduate Theological University in Berkeley …

Those who for centuries performed mitzvot only for the sake of performing a mitzvot were, in essence, acting as “God”s chiropractors,” and expecting God to reply, “Thanks, I needed that,” he said.

Kushner said the practice of continually dissecting and “recreating ourselves” through the study of sacred texts is “an enterprise unique to Judaism.”

The master text of Kabala is the Zohar, a book once so revered that “for 400 years more Jews could quote Zohar than Talmud,” said Kushner.

Kabala, with its mystical overtones, bears a similarity to Eastern theology with its emphasis on the feminine dimension of the divine and infusion of divine presence into everyday events.

The erotic yearning that can be found on the Zohar”s pages, explained Kushner, can be interpreted as: “It makes me happier to do what my lover wants than what I want. In loving someone else, we have a heightened sense of self.”

Like Kushner, Steinsaltz also drew a connection between human action and divine reaction.

“Life is identical with the divine,” he said …

http://www.njjewishnews.com/njjn.com/110107/sxScholarsTakeSeparate.html

Reform Congregation Nostalgic for Genocidal Racist Texts

October 31, 2007

The genocidal racial supremacism, pantheism, self-worship, sex magic, witchcraft, etc., of Kabbalah is making a comeback among Benedict’s elder brothers of the Reformed persuasion who previously distanced themselves from some of the dark elements of Orthodox Judaism.

Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz signs a copy of Opening Tanya, one of the 60 books he has authored, for Rabbi Claudio Kogan of Anshe Emeth Memorial Temple in New Brunswick

Scholars take separate paths into the mystic

by Debra Rubin
NJJN Bureau Chief/Middlesex
10.30.07

Rabbis from Orthodox and Reform backgrounds brought their insights into Jewish mysticism to a New Brunswick synagogue this month.

And while they may have started from very different places, they both arrived at a destination where those looking to rise above the material and ordinary could find resources in Jewish tradition.

Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz, the noted Israeli scholar perhaps best known for his translation of the Talmud into modern Hebrew and English, spoke Oct. 17 at Anshe Emeth Memorial Temple in New Brunswick on How To Live a Spiritual Life in a Materialistic Time.

Rabbi Lawrence Kushner, author of a series of influential books on Jewish mysticism and spirituality, spoke Oct. 22 on Kabbalah: A Reform Approach, reading passages from his book Kabbalah: A Love Story …

… “Real Kabala is when you use your study of Kabala to heal the divine,” said Kushner, the scholar-in-residence at Congregation Emanu-El of San Francisco and visiting professor of Jewish spirituality at the Graduate Theological University in Berkeley …

Those who for centuries performed mitzvot only for the sake of performing a mitzvot were, in essence, acting as “God”s chiropractors,” and expecting God to reply, “Thanks, I needed that,” he said.

Kushner said the practice of continually dissecting and “recreating ourselves” through the study of sacred texts is “an enterprise unique to Judaism.”

The master text of Kabala is the Zohar, a book once so revered that “for 400 years more Jews could quote Zohar than Talmud,” said Kushner.

Kabala, with its mystical overtones, bears a similarity to Eastern theology with its emphasis on the feminine dimension of the divine and infusion of divine presence into everyday events.

The erotic yearning that can be found on the Zohar”s pages, explained Kushner, can be interpreted as: “It makes me happier to do what my lover wants than what I want. In loving someone else, we have a heightened sense of self.”

Like Kushner, Steinsaltz also drew a connection between human action and divine reaction.

“Life is identical with the divine,” he said …

http://www.njjewishnews.com/njjn.com/110107/sxScholarsTakeSeparate.html