Archive for the ‘Suicide’ Category

Talmud Study now Mandatory in South Korea

March 28, 2011

I recall hearing reports of this in 2005 from a person teaching English to schoolchildren in South Korea. This person also said that The Diary of Anne Frank is required reading in South Korean schools. The evangelists of double-standard ‘Noahidism’ in the East are primarily Chabad.

I suspect that much of this is based in awe and suspicious beliefs about Judaic power and wealth. Having nearly non-existant Judaic populations and little practical experience to base an informed opinion on, these people aren’t learning real Talmud any more than ‘Madonna’ is. They’re learning the P.R. version of Talmud intended for ‘Noahide’ consumption. The Palestinian people have much practical experience with actualized ‘wisdom of the Talmud.’

As I understand, Judaism and Zionism are not as highly regarded in Japan.

see:

Talmud Study now Mandatory in South Korea

Also see:

China (re)Discovers the Business Wisdom of the Talmud

Vatican to Move Rabbinic Subversion Beyond the Clergy and Into the Pews

October 17, 2007

Xavier University Representatives to Attend Catholic-Jewish Relations Conference at Vatican
10/16/2007 – PST

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MEDIA ADVISORY
Catholic PRWire

CINCINNATI, OH, OCTOBER 16, 2007 – Xavier University President Michael J. Graham, S.J., and Rabbi Abie Ingber, director for Hillel at Xavier, along with a group of Xavier representatives will travel to Rome to attend the First Lay Conference on Catholic-Jewish relations at the Vatican, October 21-25.

The other members of the Xavier group include: James Buchanan, director for Edward B. Brueggeman Center for Dialogue; Art Shriberg, professor of management and entrepreneurship; Jewish student Michael Loban; and Catholic student Maggie Meyer.

The conference’s goal, Ingber says, is to move bridge-building beyond the clergy and “into the pews.” The discussion will revolve around identifying areas of “commonality and divide” between the traditions. Lay leaders from 18 U.S. cities will attend, hopefully laying the groundwork for a network to share ideas and programming. Participants will also meet with high-ranking Church officials at the Vatican to create a greater understanding of issues between the two faiths.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for all of us at Xavier, especially our students,” said Graham. “Exploring and discussing the many aspects of our two traditions at such a grassroots level is so important for our future as people of faith.”

“Our hope is we can come back to the U.S. and continue these relationships and perhaps even expand it to include lay leaders from the Muslim community,” Ingber says. “If you get good at bridge building, there are lots of rivers to cross.”

The conference is sponsored by the Interreligious Information Center (IIC) of which Ingber is vice president. Through research, academic exchanges, educational programs, media outreach, IIC develops projects and activities to enhance greater understanding of faiths and religion in our society. IIC works will all major faith groups.

Beyond the dialogue, the group will present a Menorah to Pope Benedict. The Menorah is a replica of one Ingber helped install at the Vatican in observance of Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) in 1999. Replicas have also been presented to the late Pope John Paul II and Father Graham. The group will also meet with Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity and Jerzy Kluger, Pope John Paul II’s closest Jewish friend. They also plan to visit the Great Synagogue of Rome.

http://www.catholic.org/prwire/headline.php?ID=4277

Also see:

Xavier University Gets Even More Kosher

Vatican to Move Rabbinic Subversion Beyond the Clergy and Into the Pews

October 17, 2007

Xavier University Representatives to Attend Catholic-Jewish Relations Conference at Vatican
10/16/2007 – PST

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MEDIA ADVISORY
Catholic PRWire

CINCINNATI, OH, OCTOBER 16, 2007 – Xavier University President Michael J. Graham, S.J., and Rabbi Abie Ingber, director for Hillel at Xavier, along with a group of Xavier representatives will travel to Rome to attend the First Lay Conference on Catholic-Jewish relations at the Vatican, October 21-25.

The other members of the Xavier group include: James Buchanan, director for Edward B. Brueggeman Center for Dialogue; Art Shriberg, professor of management and entrepreneurship; Jewish student Michael Loban; and Catholic student Maggie Meyer.

The conference’s goal, Ingber says, is to move bridge-building beyond the clergy and “into the pews.” The discussion will revolve around identifying areas of “commonality and divide” between the traditions. Lay leaders from 18 U.S. cities will attend, hopefully laying the groundwork for a network to share ideas and programming. Participants will also meet with high-ranking Church officials at the Vatican to create a greater understanding of issues between the two faiths.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for all of us at Xavier, especially our students,” said Graham. “Exploring and discussing the many aspects of our two traditions at such a grassroots level is so important for our future as people of faith.”

“Our hope is we can come back to the U.S. and continue these relationships and perhaps even expand it to include lay leaders from the Muslim community,” Ingber says. “If you get good at bridge building, there are lots of rivers to cross.”

The conference is sponsored by the Interreligious Information Center (IIC) of which Ingber is vice president. Through research, academic exchanges, educational programs, media outreach, IIC develops projects and activities to enhance greater understanding of faiths and religion in our society. IIC works will all major faith groups.

Beyond the dialogue, the group will present a Menorah to Pope Benedict. The Menorah is a replica of one Ingber helped install at the Vatican in observance of Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) in 1999. Replicas have also been presented to the late Pope John Paul II and Father Graham. The group will also meet with Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity and Jerzy Kluger, Pope John Paul II’s closest Jewish friend. They also plan to visit the Great Synagogue of Rome.

http://www.catholic.org/prwire/headline.php?ID=4277

Vatican to Move Rabbinic Subversion Beyond the Clergy and Into the Pews

October 17, 2007

Xavier University Representatives to Attend Catholic-Jewish Relations Conference at Vatican
10/16/2007 – PST

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MEDIA ADVISORY
Catholic PRWire

CINCINNATI, OH, OCTOBER 16, 2007 – Xavier University President Michael J. Graham, S.J., and Rabbi Abie Ingber, director for Hillel at Xavier, along with a group of Xavier representatives will travel to Rome to attend the First Lay Conference on Catholic-Jewish relations at the Vatican, October 21-25.

The other members of the Xavier group include: James Buchanan, director for Edward B. Brueggeman Center for Dialogue; Art Shriberg, professor of management and entrepreneurship; Jewish student Michael Loban; and Catholic student Maggie Meyer.

The conference’s goal, Ingber says, is to move bridge-building beyond the clergy and “into the pews.” The discussion will revolve around identifying areas of “commonality and divide” between the traditions. Lay leaders from 18 U.S. cities will attend, hopefully laying the groundwork for a network to share ideas and programming. Participants will also meet with high-ranking Church officials at the Vatican to create a greater understanding of issues between the two faiths.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for all of us at Xavier, especially our students,” said Graham. “Exploring and discussing the many aspects of our two traditions at such a grassroots level is so important for our future as people of faith.”

“Our hope is we can come back to the U.S. and continue these relationships and perhaps even expand it to include lay leaders from the Muslim community,” Ingber says. “If you get good at bridge building, there are lots of rivers to cross.”

The conference is sponsored by the Interreligious Information Center (IIC) of which Ingber is vice president. Through research, academic exchanges, educational programs, media outreach, IIC develops projects and activities to enhance greater understanding of faiths and religion in our society. IIC works will all major faith groups.

Beyond the dialogue, the group will present a Menorah to Pope Benedict. The Menorah is a replica of one Ingber helped install at the Vatican in observance of Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) in 1999. Replicas have also been presented to the late Pope John Paul II and Father Graham. The group will also meet with Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity and Jerzy Kluger, Pope John Paul II’s closest Jewish friend. They also plan to visit the Great Synagogue of Rome.

http://www.catholic.org/prwire/headline.php?ID=4277

Also see:

Xavier University Gets Even More Kosher

Poland’s "Catholic" B’nai Noach

August 28, 2007

‘My personal Atlantis’

By Goel Pinto

Haaretz

Janusz Makuch is visibly moved when he talks about the opening show he is planning for next year’s Festival of Jewish Culture, to be held in Krakow. He fantasizes and gesticulates like a performer acting out a play, and his English is peppered with Yiddish and Hebrew words. He repeats the phrase “with God’s help” in a thick Polish accent and with a frequency typical of traditional Jewish Israelis.

For next year’s festival, he envisions two enormous stages: One in Jerusalem on a slope adjoining the Old City walls, and another in the central square in Kazimierz, Krakow’s old Jewish quarter. Giant screens will facilitate communication between both stages. The evening will open with the sounds of three cantors and a choir in Jerusalem singing to Krakow. Singers and cantors in Poland will respond.

“The entire evening will be a message to the world,” he says. “The whole world will be able to view the dialogue, the bridge that will open between Poland and Israel, between Jew and non-Jew. It’s a crazy concept, I know, but I will do it” …

“In my opinion, the seminars and lectures are the most important feature of the festival,” he says. “Imagine a week-long workshop in an ancient synagogue in which two Jewish women from Warsaw teach 50 Polish children and their Catholic, Polish mothers about Passover, Rosh Hashanah and even Shavuot. As far as I am concerned, that is the goal: To teach children to maintain an open approach to the world in general and the Jewish world in particular in the hope that they will become pluralistic citizens when they grow up” …

When Makuch speaks of “we,” the Jews, as opposed to “them,” the non-Jews, and employs the Hebrew word for soul, neshama, to express his real connection to Jewish culture, one might mistakenly assume that he is Jewish. But he comes from a Catholic family and is married to a Catholic who serves as the chief editor of a major publishing house in Poland …

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/897586.html

Poland’s "Catholic" B’nai Noach

August 28, 2007

‘My personal Atlantis’

By Goel Pinto

Haaretz

Janusz Makuch is visibly moved when he talks about the opening show he is planning for next year’s Festival of Jewish Culture, to be held in Krakow. He fantasizes and gesticulates like a performer acting out a play, and his English is peppered with Yiddish and Hebrew words. He repeats the phrase “with God’s help” in a thick Polish accent and with a frequency typical of traditional Jewish Israelis.

For next year’s festival, he envisions two enormous stages: One in Jerusalem on a slope adjoining the Old City walls, and another in the central square in Kazimierz, Krakow’s old Jewish quarter. Giant screens will facilitate communication between both stages. The evening will open with the sounds of three cantors and a choir in Jerusalem singing to Krakow. Singers and cantors in Poland will respond.

“The entire evening will be a message to the world,” he says. “The whole world will be able to view the dialogue, the bridge that will open between Poland and Israel, between Jew and non-Jew. It’s a crazy concept, I know, but I will do it” …

“In my opinion, the seminars and lectures are the most important feature of the festival,” he says. “Imagine a week-long workshop in an ancient synagogue in which two Jewish women from Warsaw teach 50 Polish children and their Catholic, Polish mothers about Passover, Rosh Hashanah and even Shavuot. As far as I am concerned, that is the goal: To teach children to maintain an open approach to the world in general and the Jewish world in particular in the hope that they will become pluralistic citizens when they grow up” …

When Makuch speaks of “we,” the Jews, as opposed to “them,” the non-Jews, and employs the Hebrew word for soul, neshama, to express his real connection to Jewish culture, one might mistakenly assume that he is Jewish. But he comes from a Catholic family and is married to a Catholic who serves as the chief editor of a major publishing house in Poland …

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/897586.html

The Cardinal Bea Centre for Judaic Studies at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome

April 10, 2007

What is characterized by some as “‘antisemitic’ conspiracy theory” when it’s written about at this blog is called “interfaith dialog” when it takes place between Cardinals and rabbis in Rome.

The Sephardic front is authoritatively represented by Maimonides, who … [treats] all Christians as “idolaters” tout-court. Next to this negative vision of Christian theology, Maimonides does however give a more open and moderate assessment of the Messianic role of Christianity and Islam in the world. Here is for instance a passage of the Treatise on Kings, which does not appear in all editions (of the Mishneh Torah), because in most of them it is censored: “… all the words of Jesus of Nazareth and of the son of Ishmael [Mohammed] who came after him are aimed at paving the way to the King-Messiah and at preparing the whole world to serve God together, as it is written: ‘because I shall then transform the language of the peoples into a pure language, so that all shall invoke the Name of the Lord shall serve him in a sole unit [all together, in harmony]’ (Sof. 3,9)”. …Maimonides lets Christianity and Islam, so to speak, do a “qualitative leap”: he includes the two religions within a sole providential plan that sees them as protagonists of a preparatory itinerary of humanity as a whole towards the [Judaic] Messianic event.

Maimonides’ ambivalent opinion – negatively on the theological level, but positively open in its Messianic perspective – appears to be the clearest and most straightforward affirmation of the involvement of Christianity in a providential role of a Messianic-providential type. And this opinion continues to represent a major stepping stone in the path that Christianity and Judaism make together, though along parallel and distinct planes. Maybe even the category of the “descendants of Noah,” which is admittedly rather inadequate and weak, may still be used to think of Christianity in Jewish terms and to reconcile conceptually (and not only conceptually) the two religions.(Rabbi Prof. Giuseppe Laras, Rome, 4th November 2004 at the Pontifical Gregorian University)

http://www.bc.edu/research/cjl/meta-elements/texts/center/conferences/Bea_Centre_C-J_Relations_04-05/Laras.htm

Does this sound familiar? It should, if you read the following essay entered on this blog a few months ago: http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/jpiis-522-jest-at-expense-of-noachides.html

The Cardinal Bea Centre for Judaic Studies at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome

April 10, 2007

What is characterized by some as “‘antisemitic’ conspiracy theory” when it’s written about at this blog is called “interfaith dialog” when it takes place between Cardinals and rabbis in Rome.

The Sephardic front is authoritatively represented by Maimonides, who … [treats] all Christians as “idolaters” tout-court. Next to this negative vision of Christian theology, Maimonides does however give a more open and moderate assessment of the Messianic role of Christianity and Islam in the world. Here is for instance a passage of the Treatise on Kings, which does not appear in all editions (of the Mishneh Torah), because in most of them it is censored: “… all the words of Jesus of Nazareth and of the son of Ishmael [Mohammed] who came after him are aimed at paving the way to the King-Messiah and at preparing the whole world to serve God together, as it is written: ‘because I shall then transform the language of the peoples into a pure language, so that all shall invoke the Name of the Lord shall serve him in a sole unit [all together, in harmony]’ (Sof. 3,9)”. …Maimonides lets Christianity and Islam, so to speak, do a “qualitative leap”: he includes the two religions within a sole providential plan that sees them as protagonists of a preparatory itinerary of humanity as a whole towards the [Judaic] Messianic event.

Maimonides’ ambivalent opinion – negatively on the theological level, but positively open in its Messianic perspective – appears to be the clearest and most straightforward affirmation of the involvement of Christianity in a providential role of a Messianic-providential type. And this opinion continues to represent a major stepping stone in the path that Christianity and Judaism make together, though along parallel and distinct planes. Maybe even the category of the “descendants of Noah,” which is admittedly rather inadequate and weak, may still be used to think of Christianity in Jewish terms and to reconcile conceptually (and not only conceptually) the two religions.(Rabbi Prof. Giuseppe Laras, Rome, 4th November 2004 at the Pontifical Gregorian University)

http://www.bc.edu/research/cjl/meta-elements/texts/center/conferences/Bea_Centre_C-J_Relations_04-05/Laras.htm

Does this sound familiar? It should, if you read the following essay entered on this blog a few months ago: http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/jpiis-522-jest-at-expense-of-noachides.html

One More Papal Knight Defender of the Talmud Joins the Battalion

March 27, 2007

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is one of the Vatican’s eight Talmudic/Kabbalistic knights. More on the other seven HERE, and HERE. This one is not only a rabbi, but also a member of the Anti-Defamation League of the Judaic, Freemasonic B’nai B’rith. Who needs enemies when you have rabbinic-masonic knights on your side?

Catholic-Jewish Relations Pioneer Named By Pope To Receive Highest Church Honor

New York, New York, March 26, 2007…Rabbi Leon Klenicki, Director Emeritus of Interfaith Affairs of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), has been named a Papal Knight of the Order of St. Gregory the Great by Pope Benedict XVI, for his historic contributions in improving the relationship between Catholics and Jews. The Papal Order of Saint Gregory is the highest honor the Catholic Church confers on a layperson, in recognition of “Outstanding Services Rendered to the Welfare of Society and the Church”. This Pontifical Honor of Knighthood is conferred by the Holy Father on his own initiative and at the recommendation of diocesan bishops who present worthy candidates to the Holy Father.

Rabbi Klenicki becomes the second ADL interfaith official to receive papal knighthood. In 1986, the late Dr. Joseph L. Lichten became the first American Jew to receive the honor when Pope John Paul II named him a knight commander of the Order of St. Gregory the Great.

Rabbi Klenicki, a renowned scholar and theologian, now joins a select group of living Jews, and only a handful of rabbis, who have been so honored by the Vatican.

“We are extremely proud that Rabbi Klenicki’s decades of work to help reconcile the Catholic and Jewish faiths have been recognized by Pope Benedict XVI with this unique papal honor,” said Abraham H. Foxman, ADL National Director. “We can think of no one more deserving of this honor than Rabbi Leon Klenicki,” who has worked tirelessly and passionately to bring about mutual understanding and respect between the two faiths.”

Cardinal Sean O’Malley of Boston, who will present a scroll from the Holy See as a formal recognition of Knighthood, and the medallion and sword which are the insignia of the Order, said, ” Rabbi Klenicki has been a pioneer in Jewish-Catholic relations for decades. His own personal experiences of anti-Semitism led the Rabbi to be a passionate advocate for education as means of dispelling religious prejudice and promoting inter-religious collaboration. Rabbi Leon Klenicki’s life has been the source of blessings for all of us, we are deeply grateful for his witness and his work.”

A native of Argentina, Klenicki received his rabbinical degree from Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion in Cincinnati in 1967 and returned to Buenos Aires as Director of the Latin American Office of the World Union for Progressive Judaism. In that position he helped develop Reform Judaism in Latin America.

Since his days as a student growing up in Argentina, Rabbi Klenicki has been interested in inter-religious dialogue. In 1968, he delivered the major paper representing the Jewish community at the first Latin American meeting of Jews and Catholics in Bogota, Colombia. This historic meeting, organized by ADL and CELAM (Latin American Episcopal Conference), occurred during the visit of Pope Paul VI to Colombia. It was the first time that Jews and Catholics met in Latin America on a continental basis, and it paved the way for future dialogues and inter-religious work.

Rabbi Klenicki was authorized by CELAM and the Argentine Council of Jews and Christians to undertake a study of catechisms and Catholic religious texts, the first of its kind to be done in South America. His final recommendations were presented to the Bishops Conference in Argentina for a revision of how Jews and Judaism were portrayed in Catholic texts. He traveled to Rome on behalf of the Council of Jews and Christians for study sessions at the Vatican. He also served as an advisor on interfaith affairs for the DAIA, the main Jewish organization in Argentina. He served as spiritual leader of Congregation Emanu-El in Buenos Aires.

In 1973 he moved to New York to become head of ADL’s Jewish-Catholic Relations Department and in was named ADL Director of Interfaith Affairs Co-Liaison to the Vatican in 1984, positions he held until his retirement in 2001.

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops recommended to all US bishops and cardinals to observe Holocaust Day by using as a liturgy the service prepared by Rabbi Klenicki and Dr. Eugene J. Fisher, Associate Director, Secretariat for Ecumenical and Inter-religious Affairs, USCCB.

A lecturer at Catholic and Jewish universities and seminaries, Rabbi Klenicki was the first Hugo Gryn Fellow at the Centre for the Study of Jewish Christian Relations at Cambridge University, England; one of the first two Scholars-at-Large for the Graymoor Ecumenical & Interreligious Institute in New York; and a visiting professor at Leuven Catholic University in Belgium.

A prolific writer and editor on inter-religious issues for American and international publications, Rabbi Klenicki is the recipient of many awards and honors.

http://www.adl.org/PresRele/Mise_00/5012_00.htm

One More Papal Knight Defender of the Talmud Joins the Battalion

March 27, 2007

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is one of the Vatican’s eight Talmudic/Kabbalistic knights. More on the other seven HERE, and HERE. This one is not only a rabbi, but also a member of the Anti-Defamation League of the Judaic, Freemasonic B’nai B’rith. Who needs enemies when you have rabbinic-masonic knights on your side?

Catholic-Jewish Relations Pioneer Named By Pope To Receive Highest Church Honor

New York, New York, March 26, 2007…Rabbi Leon Klenicki, Director Emeritus of Interfaith Affairs of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), has been named a Papal Knight of the Order of St. Gregory the Great by Pope Benedict XVI, for his historic contributions in improving the relationship between Catholics and Jews. The Papal Order of Saint Gregory is the highest honor the Catholic Church confers on a layperson, in recognition of “Outstanding Services Rendered to the Welfare of Society and the Church”. This Pontifical Honor of Knighthood is conferred by the Holy Father on his own initiative and at the recommendation of diocesan bishops who present worthy candidates to the Holy Father.

Rabbi Klenicki becomes the second ADL interfaith official to receive papal knighthood. In 1986, the late Dr. Joseph L. Lichten became the first American Jew to receive the honor when Pope John Paul II named him a knight commander of the Order of St. Gregory the Great.

Rabbi Klenicki, a renowned scholar and theologian, now joins a select group of living Jews, and only a handful of rabbis, who have been so honored by the Vatican.

“We are extremely proud that Rabbi Klenicki’s decades of work to help reconcile the Catholic and Jewish faiths have been recognized by Pope Benedict XVI with this unique papal honor,” said Abraham H. Foxman, ADL National Director. “We can think of no one more deserving of this honor than Rabbi Leon Klenicki,” who has worked tirelessly and passionately to bring about mutual understanding and respect between the two faiths.”

Cardinal Sean O’Malley of Boston, who will present a scroll from the Holy See as a formal recognition of Knighthood, and the medallion and sword which are the insignia of the Order, said, ” Rabbi Klenicki has been a pioneer in Jewish-Catholic relations for decades. His own personal experiences of anti-Semitism led the Rabbi to be a passionate advocate for education as means of dispelling religious prejudice and promoting inter-religious collaboration. Rabbi Leon Klenicki’s life has been the source of blessings for all of us, we are deeply grateful for his witness and his work.”

A native of Argentina, Klenicki received his rabbinical degree from Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion in Cincinnati in 1967 and returned to Buenos Aires as Director of the Latin American Office of the World Union for Progressive Judaism. In that position he helped develop Reform Judaism in Latin America.

Since his days as a student growing up in Argentina, Rabbi Klenicki has been interested in inter-religious dialogue. In 1968, he delivered the major paper representing the Jewish community at the first Latin American meeting of Jews and Catholics in Bogota, Colombia. This historic meeting, organized by ADL and CELAM (Latin American Episcopal Conference), occurred during the visit of Pope Paul VI to Colombia. It was the first time that Jews and Catholics met in Latin America on a continental basis, and it paved the way for future dialogues and inter-religious work.

Rabbi Klenicki was authorized by CELAM and the Argentine Council of Jews and Christians to undertake a study of catechisms and Catholic religious texts, the first of its kind to be done in South America. His final recommendations were presented to the Bishops Conference in Argentina for a revision of how Jews and Judaism were portrayed in Catholic texts. He traveled to Rome on behalf of the Council of Jews and Christians for study sessions at the Vatican. He also served as an advisor on interfaith affairs for the DAIA, the main Jewish organization in Argentina. He served as spiritual leader of Congregation Emanu-El in Buenos Aires.

In 1973 he moved to New York to become head of ADL’s Jewish-Catholic Relations Department and in was named ADL Director of Interfaith Affairs Co-Liaison to the Vatican in 1984, positions he held until his retirement in 2001.

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops recommended to all US bishops and cardinals to observe Holocaust Day by using as a liturgy the service prepared by Rabbi Klenicki and Dr. Eugene J. Fisher, Associate Director, Secretariat for Ecumenical and Inter-religious Affairs, USCCB.

A lecturer at Catholic and Jewish universities and seminaries, Rabbi Klenicki was the first Hugo Gryn Fellow at the Centre for the Study of Jewish Christian Relations at Cambridge University, England; one of the first two Scholars-at-Large for the Graymoor Ecumenical & Interreligious Institute in New York; and a visiting professor at Leuven Catholic University in Belgium.

A prolific writer and editor on inter-religious issues for American and international publications, Rabbi Klenicki is the recipient of many awards and honors.

http://www.adl.org/PresRele/Mise_00/5012_00.htm