Archive for the ‘Subversion’ Category

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein on Traditional Catholicism

July 4, 2009

“There still is resistance to the new teachings in some traditional Catholic circles, still much work to be done to erase old ideas.” (Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein, “The Catholic Church and the Jews,” Cross-Currents, July 3, 2009)

http://www.cross-currents.com/archives/2009/07/03/the-catholic-church-and-the-jews/

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein is director of Interfaith Affairs for the Simon Wiesenthal Center of Holocaustolatry* [see footnote]. He holds a chair at Loyola Law School where he teaches Talmudic Law and Ethics, no-doubt, the Noahide version, with emphasis on ‘Holocaust’ guilt.

In late January 2009, Rabbi Adlerstein, appealing to Zionist propaganda, attempted to associate the SSPX and the medieval Catholic Church with terrorism writing: “the entire network of the Society of Saint Pius X are vocal enthusiasts of a medieval religious anti-Semitism that gives the Islamist imams in Pakistan some serious competition.”

http://www.wiesenthal.com/site/apps/nlnet/content2.aspx?c=lsKWLbPJLnF&b=4441467&ct=6711177

Those who think outside of the Zionist television box will know that Rabbi Adlerstein’s smear is in reality quite weak. There is no competition for the ‘holy’ racist terrorism of counterfeit Israel which was taking place at the very time that Adlerstein penned his anti-Catholic terrorism-association smear. See:

Israelis told to fight ‘holy war’ in Gaza

It seems that hypocrisy, double standards, obfuscation and projection are defining traits of Rabbi Adlerstein, which is no surprise as these are defining traits of his religion, Orthodox Judaism.

Such shame that Rabbi Adlerstein and the Wiesenthal center of Holocaustolatry were successful in coercing the ‘cleansing’ of SSPX websites and bookstores and pressuring ‘cleasing’ of the traditional liturgy of the Church even as the rabbi admits the anti-Christian anti-humanity contents of his Talmud and rouses ‘Jews’ not to cleanse these hateful texts and traditions, but to defend them. See:

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein Rouses Talmud Apologists

If only there were some Catholics who would defend the truth as strongly as Rabbi Adlerstein defends his lies.

Footnote: The ‘Holocaust’-centered idolatry of the Wiesenthal Center is plain in the quote from its founder: “When each of us comes before the Six Million, we will be asked what we did with our lives.” (Simon Wiesenthal as quoted in Wiesenthal Center magazine, Response, Vol. 20, No. 1) Needless to say, it’s not ‘the six million’ that Wiesenthal and his comrades must face in judgment. What kind of Catholic would not correct this pitiful delusion, but instead make changes to Catholic liturgy and teaching to accommodate those who propagate it?

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein on Traditional Catholicism

July 4, 2009

“There still is resistance to the new teachings in some traditional Catholic circles, still much work to be done to erase old ideas.” (Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein, “The Catholic Church and the Jews,” Cross-Currents, July 3, 2009)

http://www.cross-currents.com/archives/2009/07/03/the-catholic-church-and-the-jews/

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein is director of Interfaith Affairs for the Simon Wiesenthal Center of Holocaustolatry* [see footnote]. He holds a chair at Loyola Law School where he teaches Talmudic Law and Ethics, no-doubt, the Noahide version, with emphasis on ‘Holocaust’ guilt.

In late January 2009, Rabbi Adlerstein, appealing to Zionist propaganda, attempted to associate the SSPX and the medieval Catholic Church with terrorism writing: “the entire network of the Society of Saint Pius X are vocal enthusiasts of a medieval religious anti-Semitism that gives the Islamist imams in Pakistan some serious competition.”

http://www.wiesenthal.com/site/apps/nlnet/content2.aspx?c=lsKWLbPJLnF&b=4441467&ct=6711177

Those who think outside of the Zionist television box will know that Rabbi Adlerstein’s smear is in reality quite weak. There is no competition for the ‘holy’ racist terrorism of counterfeit Israel which was taking place at the very time that Adlerstein penned his anti-Catholic terrorism-association smear. See:

Israelis told to fight ‘holy war’ in Gaza

It seems that hypocrisy, double standards, obfuscation and projection are defining traits of Rabbi Adlerstein, which is no surprise as these are defining traits of his religion, Orthodox Judaism.

Such shame that Rabbi Adlerstein and the Wiesenthal center of Holocaustolatry were successful in coercing the ‘cleansing’ of SSPX websites and bookstores and pressuring ‘cleasing’ of the traditional liturgy of the Church even as the rabbi admits the anti-Christian anti-humanity contents of his Talmud and rouses ‘Jews’ not to cleanse these hateful texts and traditions, but to defend them. See:

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein Rouses Talmud Apologists

If only there were some Catholics who would defend the truth as strongly as Rabbi Adlerstein defends his lies.

Footnote: The ‘Holocaust’-centered idolatry of the Wiesenthal Center is plain in the quote from its founder: “When each of us comes before the Six Million, we will be asked what we did with our lives.” (Simon Wiesenthal as quoted in Wiesenthal Center magazine, Response, Vol. 20, No. 1) Needless to say, it’s not ‘the six million’ that Wiesenthal and his comrades must face in judgment. What kind of Catholic would not correct this pitiful delusion, but instead make changes to Catholic liturgy and teaching to accommodate those who propagate it?

Former ADL Director, Rabbi Eugene Korn’s New Appointment at Sacred Heart University

August 11, 2007

Local rabbi new head of interfaith center

By Jane Calem Rosen

As commutes go, his daily trip to and from his home in Bergenfield to his job in Fairfield, Conn. isn’t too bad, said Rabbi Dr. Eugene Korn, the new executive director of the Center for Christian-Jewish Understanding at Sacred Heart University.

But his travels from ordination by the Israeli rabbinate in 2003 to head up the 15-year-old institution established as the Center for Christian-Jewish Understanding to nurture ties between the Jewish people and the Catholic Church have perhaps been more extensive. Korn’s promotion from associate executive director of the center, a post he took in January, was announced following the retirement on July 1 of its long-time leader, Rabbi Joseph Ehrenkranz, an Orthodox rabbi from Stamford, Conn. (The center was co-founded with a mandate from Dr. Anthony Cernera, SHU’s president, by Ehrenkranz and Rabbi Jack Bemporad, a Reform rabbi from Englewood who later began the Center for Interreligious Understanding in Carlstadt. The late philanthropist Russell Berrie was the first chairman of the board of the SHU center.)

In a recent telephone interview from his SHU office, Korn said that he entered the field of interfaith relations almost accidentally. With a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and mathematics from Yeshiva University and a doctorate in moral philosophy from Columbia University, Korn was on a fellowship at the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem, which he described as “the foremost Jewish think tank in the world.” In a theology seminar with Dr. Asher Finkel, the head of Jewish-Christian studies at Seton Hall University in South Orange, he met Christian seminarians living in the Jewish state who believed they belonged in the land of the Bible, home to Jesus.

“I was very impressed by their spiritual depth, and became interested in theology and the spiritual issues we have in common and how to sort out the difficulties in our relationship over the years,” he said.

Korn’s participation in that seminar led to his appointment back in the United States as adjunct professor of Jewish thought at Seton Hall. At the same time, he worked as director of Jewish affairs at the American Jewish Congress, handling relations with top church officials in the United States and Europe. Among his chief accomplishments there, he said, was that “we really dealt a mortal blow in the United States to the divestment campaign against companies doing business with Israel, generated by a number of liberal churches, universities, and labor unions.”

Discussions he led with “friends in the liberal churches,” he said, led to the mounting of a counter campaign to the “radical left-wing ideologues hostile to Israel.” As a result, the national Presbyterian Church rescinded a divestment resolution and “we were also successful in influencing the Episcopalian and Lutheran churches in the U.S. not to go down that route,” he said.

At the CCJU, Korn — who is also the editor of Meorot: A Forum for Modern Orthodox Discourse, formerly the Edah Journal — hopes to build on the successes of his predecessor as well as launch initiatives in education and interfaith relations. Relations with the Vatican and bishops within the American Catholic Church grew significantly under Ehrenkranz’s direction, said Korn, noting, “We’re going to intensify those areas and move into new areas.”

According to an SHU press release, that vision encompasses three distinct institutes, one focusing on religious education to raise awareness among Jews and Christians of the recent changes in Christian theology regarding the Jewish people and Jewish scripture; the second to pursue scholarly research on values, pluralism, and theology; and the third to deepen the relationship between the Catholic Church and the Jewish people in North America and in Israel.

Specifically, in the area of religious education, SHU will establish an academic chair in September 2008 in Jewish-Christian relations. Korn will be the chair’s occupant and teach at SHU, he said.

Also in the works is a partnership between a major Catholic institution in Rome and a major Jewish institution in Jerusalem. Korn declined to name these, saying that discussions are at a sensitive stage, but added that “a number of people are all quite interested and that it’s critically important to bring together the best minds of both communities.”

Just back from a trip to Rome, Monaco, and Israel, where he spoke on issues related to Mideast peace and Jewish-Christian relations, Korn said, “Interestingly, I found people associated with the Office of the Chief Rabbinate in Israel enormously receptive to deepening relations on official levels and in academic institutions with the Catholic Church. All understand that it is strategically important [for political and religious reasons] for Israel and for the Jewish people to cultivate those relations.”

Common religious concerns, he said, include the sanctity of human life and how to secure the place of religion in the modern world. Unlike interfaith relations more than half a century ago that were driven by people who sought to minimize religious and cultural differences, today’s interfaith activists are deeply religious, Korn observed.

On that front, therefore, Korn has organized a series of international conferences with philosophers, theologians, and religious leaders to explore pluralism, tolerance, religious fanaticism, and the appropriate boundaries of religious communities. “Philosophers have struggled with the foundations for tolerance and what are its legitimate limits, particularly for a religious community that believes in a view of God as absolute,” he said. “Intolerance grows from religious convictions, but we need to be both tolerant and recognize the legitimacy of the other. For many years, Christians couldn’t see the image of God in the Jewish people, but that has changed.”

The first conference was held on the SHU campus and the second is planned for October in Los Angeles, facilitated by the board of rabbis of Southern California and Roman Catholic institutions and seminaries there. Subsequent conferences will take place in Germany and Israel. The series will culminate in the publication of a book, said Korn.

To enhance the national and international stature of the CCJU, in September Korn will take three Orthodox rabbis from the United States — including the scholar Irving “Yitz” Greenberg — six Roman Catholic bishops, and a cardinal to Auschwitz for three days, followed by a three-day visit to the Vatican. The group will have an audience with Pope Benedict XVI and meet with Cardinal Walter Kasper, head of the Vatican office responsible for relations with Jews.

That undertaking, he noted, is reflective of the “revolution” over the past six decades in theological thinking and action by the leadership of the Roman Catholic Church that takes into account Jewish concerns.

Korn concluded, “It is not sheer coincidence that I have found myself in these places. I feel blessed and feel myself growing as an Orthodox Jew in response to my work.” (New Jersey Jewish Standard, August 10, 2007)

http://www.jstandard.com/articles/3037/1/Local-rabbi-new-head-of-interfaith-center

Former ADL Director, Rabbi Eugene Korn’s New Appointment at Sacred Heart University

August 11, 2007

Believe it or not, there has been resistance from many Orthodox Judaic rabbis to “interfaith dialog” with the Vatican due to a 1964 ruling by Rabbi Soloveitchik of the Rabbinic Council of America. Rabbi Eugene Korn, is working very hard to overcome whatever resistance is left. For background, see the following link:

http://www.bc.edu/research/cjl/meta-elements/texts/center/conferences/soloveitchik/Korn_23Nov03.htm

Local rabbi new head of interfaith center

By Jane Calem Rosen

As commutes go, his daily trip to and from his home in Bergenfield to his job in Fairfield, Conn. isn’t too bad, said Rabbi Dr. Eugene Korn, the new executive director of the Center for Christian-Jewish Understanding at Sacred Heart University.

But his travels from ordination by the Israeli rabbinate in 2003 to head up the 15-year-old institution established as the Center for Christian-Jewish Understanding to nurture ties between the Jewish people and the Catholic Church have perhaps been more extensive. Korn’s promotion from associate executive director of the center, a post he took in January, was announced following the retirement on July 1 of its long-time leader, Rabbi Joseph Ehrenkranz, an Orthodox rabbi from Stamford, Conn. (The center was co-founded with a mandate from Dr. Anthony Cernera, SHU’s president, by Ehrenkranz and Rabbi Jack Bemporad, a Reform rabbi from Englewood who later began the Center for Interreligious Understanding in Carlstadt. The late philanthropist Russell Berrie was the first chairman of the board of the SHU center.)

In a recent telephone interview from his SHU office, Korn said that he entered the field of interfaith relations almost accidentally. With a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and mathematics from Yeshiva University and a doctorate in moral philosophy from Columbia University, Korn was on a fellowship at the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem, which he described as “the foremost Jewish think tank in the world.” In a theology seminar with Dr. Asher Finkel, the head of Jewish-Christian studies at Seton Hall University in South Orange, he met Christian seminarians living in the Jewish state who believed they belonged in the land of the Bible, home to Jesus.

“I was very impressed by their spiritual depth, and became interested in theology and the spiritual issues we have in common and how to sort out the difficulties in our relationship over the years,” he said.

Korn’s participation in that seminar led to his appointment back in the United States as adjunct professor of Jewish thought at Seton Hall. At the same time, he worked as director of Jewish affairs at the American Jewish Congress, handling relations with top church officials in the United States and Europe. Among his chief accomplishments there, he said, was that “we really dealt a mortal blow in the United States to the divestment campaign against companies doing business with Israel, generated by a number of liberal churches, universities, and labor unions.”

Discussions he led with “friends in the liberal churches,” he said, led to the mounting of a counter campaign to the “radical left-wing ideologues hostile to Israel.” As a result, the national Presbyterian Church rescinded a divestment resolution and “we were also successful in influencing the Episcopalian and Lutheran churches in the U.S. not to go down that route,” he said.

At the CCJU, Korn — who is also the editor of Meorot: A Forum for Modern Orthodox Discourse, formerly the Edah Journal — hopes to build on the successes of his predecessor as well as launch initiatives in education and interfaith relations. Relations with the Vatican and bishops within the American Catholic Church grew significantly under Ehrenkranz’s direction, said Korn, noting, “We’re going to intensify those areas and move into new areas.”

According to an SHU press release, that vision encompasses three distinct institutes, one focusing on religious education to raise awareness among Jews and Christians of the recent changes in Christian theology regarding the Jewish people and Jewish scripture; the second to pursue scholarly research on values, pluralism, and theology; and the third to deepen the relationship between the Catholic Church and the Jewish people in North America and in Israel.

Specifically, in the area of religious education, SHU will establish an academic chair in September 2008 in Jewish-Christian relations. Korn will be the chair’s occupant and teach at SHU, he said.

Also in the works is a partnership between a major Catholic institution in Rome and a major Jewish institution in Jerusalem. Korn declined to name these, saying that discussions are at a sensitive stage, but added that “a number of people are all quite interested and that it’s critically important to bring together the best minds of both communities.”

Just back from a trip to Rome, Monaco, and Israel, where he spoke on issues related to Mideast peace and Jewish-Christian relations, Korn said, “Interestingly, I found people associated with the Office of the Chief Rabbinate in Israel enormously receptive to deepening relations on official levels and in academic institutions with the Catholic Church. All understand that it is strategically important [for political and religious reasons] for Israel and for the Jewish people to cultivate those relations.”

Common religious concerns, he said, include the sanctity of human life and how to secure the place of religion in the modern world. Unlike interfaith relations more than half a century ago that were driven by people who sought to minimize religious and cultural differences, today’s interfaith activists are deeply religious, Korn observed.

On that front, therefore, Korn has organized a series of international conferences with philosophers, theologians, and religious leaders to explore pluralism, tolerance, religious fanaticism, and the appropriate boundaries of religious communities. “Philosophers have struggled with the foundations for tolerance and what are its legitimate limits, particularly for a religious community that believes in a view of God as absolute,” he said. “Intolerance grows from religious convictions, but we need to be both tolerant and recognize the legitimacy of the other. For many years, Christians couldn’t see the image of God in the Jewish people, but that has changed.”

The first conference was held on the SHU campus and the second is planned for October in Los Angeles, facilitated by the board of rabbis of Southern California and Roman Catholic institutions and seminaries there. Subsequent conferences will take place in Germany and Israel. The series will culminate in the publication of a book, said Korn.

To enhance the national and international stature of the CCJU, in September Korn will take three Orthodox rabbis from the United States — including the scholar Irving “Yitz” Greenberg — six Roman Catholic bishops, and a cardinal to Auschwitz for three days, followed by a three-day visit to the Vatican. The group will have an audience with Pope Benedict XVI and meet with Cardinal Walter Kasper, head of the Vatican office responsible for relations with Jews.

That undertaking, he noted, is reflective of the “revolution” over the past six decades in theological thinking and action by the leadership of the Roman Catholic Church that takes into account Jewish concerns.

Korn concluded, “It is not sheer coincidence that I have found myself in these places. I feel blessed and feel myself growing as an Orthodox Jew in response to my work.” (New Jersey Jewish Standard, August 10, 2007)

http://www.jstandard.com/articles/3037/1/Local-rabbi-new-head-of-interfaith-center

Papal Commission Promotes Noahide Laws

March 22, 2007

EDITOR’S NOTE: Now we see where all of this dialogue with the rabbis has been leading. Here is a document produced by a joint committee of the Papal Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews and the Chief Rabbinate of “Israel” which promotes the rabbi-fabricated “Noahide Laws” and which outrageously suggests that these laws have a Biblical basis, not only in the Old Testament, but in the New Testament as well. Out of thin air, the pretext is drawn for adoption of Talmudic “Noahide Laws” by Christians.

Also note that this promotion of “Noahide Law” is the product of the seventh meeting of the joint commission (there are seven “Noahide Laws”).

More information on the “Noahide Laws” can be found here:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/03/chabad-lubavitch-rabbi-to-congress.html

Jewish-Catholic Commission Meeting Report

“Moral Relativism Poses a Serious Threat to Humanity”

ROME, MARCH 20, 2007 (Zenit.org).- Here is the text of the conclusions from the bilateral commission meeting of the Catholic and Jewish delegations dedicated to improving relations between the two religions.

* * *

The Delegation of the Holy See’s Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews and the Chief Rabbinate of Israel’s Delegation for Relations with the Catholic Church — Bilateral Commission Meeting,

Jerusalem, March 11-13, 2007; Adar 21-23, 5767

1. At the seventh meeting of the above commission, held in Jerusalem, the chairmen Cardinal Jorge Mejía and Chief Rabbi Shear Yashuv Cohen noted the significance of the number seven within the biblical tradition as indicating fullness and maturity. They expressed the hope that the fullness of the relationship between the Catholic and the Jewish members of this commission will be a source of blessing to both faith communities and the world at large.

Cardinal Mejía also noted the recent passing of Cardinal Johannes Willebrands former president of the Holy See’s Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews and a central figure in the historic transformation in Catholic-Jewish relations. May his memory always be for us a blessing.

2. The subject of the meeting was the “Freedom of Religion and Conscience and its Limits.” The human capacity to choose is a manifestation of the divine image in which all people are created (cf. Gen 1:26-27) and is foundational for the biblical concept of human responsibility and divine justice (cf. Deut 30:19).

3. God has created the human person as a social being which, by definition, places limits on individual human freedom. Moreover freedom of choice is derived from God and therefore is not absolute, but must reflect divine will and law. Accordingly human beings are called to freely obey the divine will as manifested in Creation and in his revealed word.

Jewish tradition emphasizes the Noachide Covenant (cf. Gen 9:9-12) as containing the universal moral code which is incumbent on all humanity. This idea is reflected in Christian scripture in the book of Acts 15:28-29.

4. Accordingly the idea of moral relativism is antithetical to this religious worldview and poses a serious threat to humanity. Even though the Enlightenment helped bring about a purification from the abuse of religion, secular society still requires religious foundations to sustain lasting moral values. Critical among these is the principal of the sanctity of human life and dignity. Ethical monotheism affirms these as inviolable human rights and therefore can provide inspiration in this regard for society at large.

5. While on principle the state should not at all limit freedom of religion for individuals and communities nor of moral conscience, it has the responsibility to guarantee the wellbeing and security of society. Accordingly it is obliged to intervene wherever and whenever a threat is posed by the promotion, teaching or exercise of violence and specifically terrorism and psychological manipulation in the name of religion.

6. In addition to respecting the freedom of religious choices, the integrity of faith communities should also be guaranteed. Accordingly it is legitimate for a society with a predominant religious identity to preserve its character, as long as this does not limit the freedom of minority communities and individuals to profess their alternative religious commitments, nor to limit their full civil rights and status as citizens, individuals and communities. This obliges us all to safeguard the integrity and dignity of holy sites, places of worship and cemeteries of all religious communities.

7. In the course of history, religious communities have not always been faithful to these values. Therefore there is a special obligation upon religious leaders and communities to prevent the improper use of religion and to educate towards respect for diversity which is essential in order to ensure a healthy, stable and peaceful society.

In this regard, there is a special role for families, schools and the authorities of state and society as well as the media to impart these values to future generations.

In conclusion the bilateral commission having met in the Holy City of Jerusalem, expressed the prayer that the Almighty would bless and inspire both religious and political leaders in the region and beyond, to work determinedly to promote peace, dignity, security and tranquility in the Holy Land for all its peoples and for the world as a whole.

Jerusalem,
March 13, 2007 — Adar 23, 5767

Chief Rabbi Shear Yashuv Cohen
(Chairman of the Jewish Delegation)

Chief Rabbi Ratson Arussi
Chief Rabbi Yossef Azran

Chief Rabbi David Brodman
Chief Rabbi David Rosen
Mr. Oded Wiener

Jorge Cardinal Mejía
(Chairman of the Catholic Delegation)

Cardinal Georges Cottier
Archbishop Antonio Ortega Franco

Archbishop Elias Chacour
Bishop Giacinto-Boulos Marcuzzo

Monsignor Pier Francesco Fumagalli
Father Norbert J. Hofmann S.D.B.

http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/pontifical_councils/chrstuni/relations-jews-docs/rc_pc_chrstuni_doc_20070313_commissione-bilaterale_en.html

[The Sanhedrin] hopes to impose Jewish law on the Jewish people and the seven “Noahide” laws — prohibitions on theft, murder, blasphemy and others, based on Jewish teaching — on Gentile nations.

http://www.beliefnet.com/story/214/story_21456_1.html

A … goal of the … Sanhedrin’s efforts in regard to the Noahide community, is to “transform the Noahide movement from a religious phenomenon – a curiosity many have not heard of – into a powerful international movement that can successfully compete with, and with G-d’s help bring about the fall of, any (other) religious movement …”

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/90646

Papal Commission Promotes Noahide Laws

March 22, 2007

EDITOR’S NOTE: Now we see where all of this dialogue with the rabbis has been leading. Here is a document produced by a joint committee of the Papal Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews and the Chief Rabbinate of “Israel” which promotes the rabbi-fabricated “Noahide Laws” and which outrageously suggests that these laws have a Biblical basis, not only in the Old Testament, but in the New Testament as well. Out of thin air, the pretext is drawn for adoption of Talmudic “Noahide Laws” by Christians.

Also note that the meeting convened on the eleventh day of the month and also the fact that this promotion of “Noahide Law” is the product of the seventh meeting of the joint commission (there are seven Noahide Laws). This is plain Kabbalism.

More information on the “Noahide Laws” can be found here:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/03/chabad-lubavitch-rabbi-to-congress.html

Jewish-Catholic Commission Meeting Report

“Moral Relativism Poses a Serious Threat to Humanity”

ROME, MARCH 20, 2007 (Zenit.org).- Here is the text of the conclusions from the bilateral commission meeting of the Catholic and Jewish delegations dedicated to improving relations between the two religions.

* * *

The Delegation of the Holy See’s Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews and the Chief Rabbinate of Israel’s Delegation for Relations with the Catholic Church — Bilateral Commission Meeting,

Jerusalem, March 11-13, 2007; Adar 21-23, 5767

1. At the seventh meeting of the above commission, held in Jerusalem, the chairmen Cardinal Jorge Mejía and Chief Rabbi Shear Yashuv Cohen noted the significance of the number seven within the biblical tradition as indicating fullness and maturity. They expressed the hope that the fullness of the relationship between the Catholic and the Jewish members of this commission will be a source of blessing to both faith communities and the world at large.

Cardinal Mejía also noted the recent passing of Cardinal Johannes Willebrands former president of the Holy See’s Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews and a central figure in the historic transformation in Catholic-Jewish relations. May his memory always be for us a blessing.

2. The subject of the meeting was the “Freedom of Religion and Conscience and its Limits.” The human capacity to choose is a manifestation of the divine image in which all people are created (cf. Gen 1:26-27) and is foundational for the biblical concept of human responsibility and divine justice (cf. Deut 30:19).

3. God has created the human person as a social being which, by definition, places limits on individual human freedom. Moreover freedom of choice is derived from God and therefore is not absolute, but must reflect divine will and law. Accordingly human beings are called to freely obey the divine will as manifested in Creation and in his revealed word.

Jewish tradition emphasizes the Noachide Covenant (cf. Gen 9:9-12) as containing the universal moral code which is incumbent on all humanity. This idea is reflected in Christian scripture in the book of Acts 15:28-29.

4. Accordingly the idea of moral relativism is antithetical to this religious worldview and poses a serious threat to humanity. Even though the Enlightenment helped bring about a purification from the abuse of religion, secular society still requires religious foundations to sustain lasting moral values. Critical among these is the principal of the sanctity of human life and dignity. Ethical monotheism affirms these as inviolable human rights and therefore can provide inspiration in this regard for society at large.

5. While on principle the state should not at all limit freedom of religion for individuals and communities nor of moral conscience, it has the responsibility to guarantee the wellbeing and security of society. Accordingly it is obliged to intervene wherever and whenever a threat is posed by the promotion, teaching or exercise of violence and specifically terrorism and psychological manipulation in the name of religion.

6. In addition to respecting the freedom of religious choices, the integrity of faith communities should also be guaranteed. Accordingly it is legitimate for a society with a predominant religious identity to preserve its character, as long as this does not limit the freedom of minority communities and individuals to profess their alternative religious commitments, nor to limit their full civil rights and status as citizens, individuals and communities. This obliges us all to safeguard the integrity and dignity of holy sites, places of worship and cemeteries of all religious communities.

7. In the course of history, religious communities have not always been faithful to these values. Therefore there is a special obligation upon religious leaders and communities to prevent the improper use of religion and to educate towards respect for diversity which is essential in order to ensure a healthy, stable and peaceful society.

In this regard, there is a special role for families, schools and the authorities of state and society as well as the media to impart these values to future generations.

In conclusion the bilateral commission having met in the Holy City of Jerusalem, expressed the prayer that the Almighty would bless and inspire both religious and political leaders in the region and beyond, to work determinedly to promote peace, dignity, security and tranquility in the Holy Land for all its peoples and for the world as a whole.

Jerusalem,
March 13, 2007 — Adar 23, 5767

Chief Rabbi Shear Yashuv Cohen
(Chairman of the Jewish Delegation)

Chief Rabbi Ratson Arussi
Chief Rabbi Yossef Azran

Chief Rabbi David Brodman
Chief Rabbi David Rosen
Mr. Oded Wiener

Jorge Cardinal Mejía
(Chairman of the Catholic Delegation)

Cardinal Georges Cottier
Archbishop Antonio Ortega Franco

Archbishop Elias Chacour
Bishop Giacinto-Boulos Marcuzzo

Monsignor Pier Francesco Fumagalli
Father Norbert J. Hofmann S.D.B.

http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/pontifical_councils/chrstuni/relations-jews-docs/rc_pc_chrstuni_doc_20070313_commissione-bilaterale_en.html

[The Sanhedrin] hopes to impose Jewish law on the Jewish people and the seven “Noahide” laws — prohibitions on theft, murder, blasphemy and others, based on Jewish teaching — on Gentile nations.

http://www.beliefnet.com/story/214/story_21456_1.html

A … goal of the … Sanhedrin’s efforts in regard to the Noahide community, is to “transform the Noahide movement from a religious phenomenon – a curiosity many have not heard of – into a powerful international movement that can successfully compete with, and with G-d’s help bring about the fall of, any (other) religious movement …”

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/90646

Papal Commission Promotes Noahide Laws

March 22, 2007

EDITOR’S NOTE: Now we see where all of this dialogue with the rabbis has been leading. Here is a document produced by a joint committee of the Papal Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews and the Chief Rabbinate of “Israel” which promotes the rabbi-fabricated “Noahide Laws” and which outrageously suggests that these laws have a Biblical basis, not only in the Old Testament, but in the New Testament as well. Out of thin air, the pretext is drawn for adoption of Talmudic “Noahide Laws” by Christians.

Also note that this promotion of “Noahide Law” is the product of the seventh meeting of the joint commission (there are seven “Noahide Laws”).

More information on the “Noahide Laws” can be found here:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/03/chabad-lubavitch-rabbi-to-congress.html

Jewish-Catholic Commission Meeting Report

“Moral Relativism Poses a Serious Threat to Humanity”

ROME, MARCH 20, 2007 (Zenit.org).- Here is the text of the conclusions from the bilateral commission meeting of the Catholic and Jewish delegations dedicated to improving relations between the two religions.

* * *

The Delegation of the Holy See’s Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews and the Chief Rabbinate of Israel’s Delegation for Relations with the Catholic Church — Bilateral Commission Meeting,

Jerusalem, March 11-13, 2007; Adar 21-23, 5767

1. At the seventh meeting of the above commission, held in Jerusalem, the chairmen Cardinal Jorge Mejía and Chief Rabbi Shear Yashuv Cohen noted the significance of the number seven within the biblical tradition as indicating fullness and maturity. They expressed the hope that the fullness of the relationship between the Catholic and the Jewish members of this commission will be a source of blessing to both faith communities and the world at large.

Cardinal Mejía also noted the recent passing of Cardinal Johannes Willebrands former president of the Holy See’s Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews and a central figure in the historic transformation in Catholic-Jewish relations. May his memory always be for us a blessing.

2. The subject of the meeting was the “Freedom of Religion and Conscience and its Limits.” The human capacity to choose is a manifestation of the divine image in which all people are created (cf. Gen 1:26-27) and is foundational for the biblical concept of human responsibility and divine justice (cf. Deut 30:19).

3. God has created the human person as a social being which, by definition, places limits on individual human freedom. Moreover freedom of choice is derived from God and therefore is not absolute, but must reflect divine will and law. Accordingly human beings are called to freely obey the divine will as manifested in Creation and in his revealed word.

Jewish tradition emphasizes the Noachide Covenant (cf. Gen 9:9-12) as containing the universal moral code which is incumbent on all humanity. This idea is reflected in Christian scripture in the book of Acts 15:28-29.

4. Accordingly the idea of moral relativism is antithetical to this religious worldview and poses a serious threat to humanity. Even though the Enlightenment helped bring about a purification from the abuse of religion, secular society still requires religious foundations to sustain lasting moral values. Critical among these is the principal of the sanctity of human life and dignity. Ethical monotheism affirms these as inviolable human rights and therefore can provide inspiration in this regard for society at large.

5. While on principle the state should not at all limit freedom of religion for individuals and communities nor of moral conscience, it has the responsibility to guarantee the wellbeing and security of society. Accordingly it is obliged to intervene wherever and whenever a threat is posed by the promotion, teaching or exercise of violence and specifically terrorism and psychological manipulation in the name of religion.

6. In addition to respecting the freedom of religious choices, the integrity of faith communities should also be guaranteed. Accordingly it is legitimate for a society with a predominant religious identity to preserve its character, as long as this does not limit the freedom of minority communities and individuals to profess their alternative religious commitments, nor to limit their full civil rights and status as citizens, individuals and communities. This obliges us all to safeguard the integrity and dignity of holy sites, places of worship and cemeteries of all religious communities.

7. In the course of history, religious communities have not always been faithful to these values. Therefore there is a special obligation upon religious leaders and communities to prevent the improper use of religion and to educate towards respect for diversity which is essential in order to ensure a healthy, stable and peaceful society.

In this regard, there is a special role for families, schools and the authorities of state and society as well as the media to impart these values to future generations.

In conclusion the bilateral commission having met in the Holy City of Jerusalem, expressed the prayer that the Almighty would bless and inspire both religious and political leaders in the region and beyond, to work determinedly to promote peace, dignity, security and tranquility in the Holy Land for all its peoples and for the world as a whole.

Jerusalem,
March 13, 2007 — Adar 23, 5767

Chief Rabbi Shear Yashuv Cohen
(Chairman of the Jewish Delegation)

Chief Rabbi Ratson Arussi
Chief Rabbi Yossef Azran

Chief Rabbi David Brodman
Chief Rabbi David Rosen
Mr. Oded Wiener

Jorge Cardinal Mejía
(Chairman of the Catholic Delegation)

Cardinal Georges Cottier
Archbishop Antonio Ortega Franco

Archbishop Elias Chacour
Bishop Giacinto-Boulos Marcuzzo

Monsignor Pier Francesco Fumagalli
Father Norbert J. Hofmann S.D.B.

http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/pontifical_councils/chrstuni/relations-jews-docs/rc_pc_chrstuni_doc_20070313_commissione-bilaterale_en.html

[The Sanhedrin] hopes to impose Jewish law on the Jewish people and the seven “Noahide” laws — prohibitions on theft, murder, blasphemy and others, based on Jewish teaching — on Gentile nations.

http://www.beliefnet.com/story/214/story_21456_1.html

A … goal of the … Sanhedrin’s efforts in regard to the Noahide community, is to “transform the Noahide movement from a religious phenomenon – a curiosity many have not heard of – into a powerful international movement that can successfully compete with, and with G-d’s help bring about the fall of, any (other) religious movement …”

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/90646

Chabad Lubavitch Rabbi to Congress: "Congress Convenes to Fulfill Noahide Commandment"

March 19, 2007

See video of Chabad Lubavitch rabbi Shea Harlig preaching to U.S. House representatives that “Congress convenes to fulfill one of the seven Noahide commandments.”

What are the Noahide Laws?

NOACHIDE LAWS, the seven laws considered by rabbinic tradition as the minimal moral duties enjoined by the Bible on all men (Sanh. 56–60; Yad, Melakhim, 8:10, 10:12) …

The seven Noachide laws as traditionally enumerated are: the prohibitions of idolatry, blasphemy, bloodshed, sexual sins, theft, and eating from a living animal, as well as the injunction to establish a legal system (Tosef., Av. Zar. 8:4; Sanh. 56a). Except for the last, all are negative, and the last itself is usually interpreted as commanding the enforcement of the others (Maim. Yad, Melakhim, 9:1). (Encyclopaedia Judaica, “Noahide Laws”)

Who is an idolator according to the codifier of Judaism, Moses Maimonides?

“The Christians are idolaters, and Sunday is their holiday…” (Maimonides, Mishneh Torah, Avoda Zorah 9;4)

How does the Judaic “justice” system of double standards handle those accused of disobeying Noahide law (ie. Christian “idolaters”)?

A non-Jew is put to death on the basis of a decision given by one judge [no jury], and on the basis of testimony given by a single witness, and even if he was not given a proper warning prior to the commission of his offense. He is put to death on the basis of testimony and a decision given by a man but not on the basis of testimony and a decision given by a woman, and the man who testified or decided against him can even be a relative.

A Jew can only be put to death by a court of twenty-three judges, and on the basis of the testimony of two male witnesses who are not disqualified from testifying on account of kinship, and after being properly warned against committing the transgression. But none of these rules apply in the case of a non-Jew. (Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin 57b, Steinsaltz edition, vol.18, page 110)

What happens to those found guilty of disobeying Noahide law in a Judaic kangaroo court?

… violation of any one of the seven laws subjects the Noachide to capital punishment by decapitation (Sanh. 57a).(Encyclopaedia Judaica, “Noahide Laws”)

Now, what was that Ferrara was saying about those nice rabbis?

Chabad Lubavitch Rabbi to Congress: "Congress Convenes to Fulfill Noahide Commandment"

March 19, 2007

See video of Chabad Lubavitch rabbi Shea Harlig preaching to U.S. House representatives that “Congress convenes to fulfill one of the seven Noahide commandments.”

What are the Noahide Laws?

NOACHIDE LAWS, the seven laws considered by rabbinic tradition as the minimal moral duties enjoined by the Bible on all men (Sanh. 56–60; Yad, Melakhim, 8:10, 10:12) …

The seven Noachide laws as traditionally enumerated are: the prohibitions of idolatry, blasphemy, bloodshed, sexual sins, theft, and eating from a living animal, as well as the injunction to establish a legal system (Tosef., Av. Zar. 8:4; Sanh. 56a). Except for the last, all are negative, and the last itself is usually interpreted as commanding the enforcement of the others (Maim. Yad, Melakhim, 9:1). (Encyclopaedia Judaica, “Noahide Laws”)

Who is an idolator according to the codifier of Judaism, Moses Maimonides?

“The Christians are idolaters, and Sunday is their holiday…” (Maimonides, Mishneh Torah, Avoda Zorah 9;4)

How does the Judaic “justice” system of double standards handle those accused of disobeying Noahide law (ie. Christian “idolaters”)?

A non-Jew is put to death on the basis of a decision given by one judge [no jury], and on the basis of testimony given by a single witness, and even if he was not given a proper warning prior to the commission of his offense. He is put to death on the basis of testimony and a decision given by a man but not on the basis of testimony and a decision given by a woman, and the man who testified or decided against him can even be a relative.

A Jew can only be put to death by a court of twenty-three judges, and on the basis of the testimony of two male witnesses who are not disqualified from testifying on account of kinship, and after being properly warned against committing the transgression. But none of these rules apply in the case of a non-Jew. (Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin 57b, Steinsaltz edition, vol.18, page 110)

What happens to those found guilty of disobeying Noahide law in a Judaic kangaroo court?

… violation of any one of the seven laws subjects the Noachide to capital punishment by decapitation (Sanh. 57a).(Encyclopaedia Judaica, “Noahide Laws”)

Now, what was that Ferrara was saying about those nice rabbis?

Chabad Lubavitch Rabbi to Congress: "Congress Convenes to Fulfill Noahide Commandment"

March 19, 2007

See video of Chabad Lubavitch rabbi Shea Harlig preaching to U.S. House representatives that “Congress convenes to fulfill one of the seven Noahide commandments.”

What are the Noahide Laws?

NOACHIDE LAWS, the seven laws considered by rabbinic tradition as the minimal moral duties enjoined by the Bible on all men (Sanh. 56–60; Yad, Melakhim, 8:10, 10:12) …

The seven Noachide laws as traditionally enumerated are: the prohibitions of idolatry, blasphemy, bloodshed, sexual sins, theft, and eating from a living animal, as well as the injunction to establish a legal system (Tosef., Av. Zar. 8:4; Sanh. 56a). Except for the last, all are negative, and the last itself is usually interpreted as commanding the enforcement of the others (Maim. Yad, Melakhim, 9:1). (Encyclopaedia Judaica, “Noahide Laws”)

Who is an idolator according to the codifier of Judaism, Moses Maimonides?

“The Christians are idolaters, and Sunday is their holiday…” (Maimonides, Mishneh Torah, Avoda Zorah 9;4)

How does the Judaic “justice” system of double standards handle those accused of disobeying Noahide law (ie. Christian “idolaters”)?

A non-Jew is put to death on the basis of a decision given by one judge [no jury], and on the basis of testimony given by a single witness, and even if he was not given a proper warning prior to the commission of his offense. He is put to death on the basis of testimony and a decision given by a man but not on the basis of testimony and a decision given by a woman, and the man who testified or decided against him can even be a relative.

A Jew can only be put to death by a court of twenty-three judges, and on the basis of the testimony of two male witnesses who are not disqualified from testifying on account of kinship, and after being properly warned against committing the transgression. But none of these rules apply in the case of a non-Jew. (Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin 57b, Steinsaltz edition, vol.18, page 110)

What happens to those found guilty of disobeying Noahide law in a Judaic kangaroo court?

… violation of any one of the seven laws subjects the Noachide to capital punishment by decapitation (Sanh. 57a).(Encyclopaedia Judaica, “Noahide Laws”)

Now, what was that Ferrara was saying about those nice rabbis?