Archive for the ‘Stations of the Cross’ Category

Bishop Fisher Says Activist Parents of Two Girls Repeatedly Raped by Priest are "Dwelling Crankily on Old Wounds"

July 17, 2008

This scoundrel, Bishop Anthony Fisher of Australia, who has mocked the Catholic parents of two girls who were repeatedly raped by a priest in a Catholic grade school in Australia–one of whom has since committed suicide–has taken the greatest care in designing a “World Youth Day” stations of the cross which doesn’t offend the tender sensibilities of the rabbis:

see:

Another Kosher Stations of the Cross Concocted for “World Youth Day”

Could you imagine Bishop Fisher dismissing the rabbis as “dwelling crankily on old wounds”? It seems to me that Bishop Fisher is operating from the principle that there are two classes of people, one with much higher value than the other. This is not a Christian principle. It’s a rabbinic principle.

Youth Day coordinator ‘misspoke on abuse’

Thu Jul 17, 2008

ABC News


World Youth Day organisers say comments made by the event’s coordinator about victims of sexual abuse do not represent his true attitude, as the Vatican casts doubt on whether the Pope will offer them a full apology.

Bishop Anthony Fisher yesterday said some people were “dwelling crankily on old wounds”, in response to fresh criticism about how the Catholic Church handles abuse by the clergy.

The remarks enraged advocates for sex abuse victims.

Bishop Fisher was referring to the case of two sisters who were repeatedly raped by abusive priest Father Kevin O’Donnell in Melbourne while they were in primary school.

Emma Foster committed suicide at the age of 26 earlier this year after suffering from anorexia and drug abuse.

Her younger sister, Katherine Foster, turned to alcohol and now needs 24-hour care after being hit by a car.

Their father, Anthony Foster, is on his way to Sydney from Britain, seeking an audience with Sydney’s Archbishop, Cardinal George Pell, or Pope Benedict.

Mr Foster has told ABC TV’s Lateline program he is calling for changes in the way the Church deals with victims.

The chief operational officer of World Youth Day, Danny Casey, has defended Bishop Fisher after the event coordinator yesterday expressed disappointment the issue had been raised during celebrations.

“If Bishop Anthony made particular comments about how some in the media seek to portray the church during abuse matters, he’s a man of deep compassion, I know he feels great compassion and sympathy for the victims and for all those who have been hurt through abuse,” he said.

Father Kevin O’Donnell was never tried on the Foster case but was convicted for other child sex crimes in 1995 and sent to jail. He died in 1997.

Cardinal Pell apologised to the Foster sisters as Archbishop of Melbourne in 1998. He encouraged the family to enter the Towards Healing Program, which capped compensation payments at $50,000.

The family rejected the offer, instead opting to pursue the Catholic Church through the courts for eight years. They eventually negotiated a settlement, believed to be the largest compensation pay-out of its kind in Australia.

Despite an earlier admission and an apology from Cardinal Pell, the Church’s lawyers later denied any admissions had been made about the abuse of the two girls.

Apology in doubt

Meanwhile, Pope Benedict’s spokesman has raised doubts over whether the pontiff will offer a full and unreserved apology for sexual abuse by clergymen during his visit to Sydney.

The contradictory signal came just three days after the pontiff himself, during his flight to Sydney, said he would apologise.

The director of the Vatican press office, Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, says the Pope has not given a commitment he will apologise to abuse victims and may simply refer to the issue in a “statement”.

“I draw your attention to the term ‘apology’ that journalists are using,” Father Lombardi said in Italian during a press conference.

“The Pope in the plane [to Australia] spoke of the problems of sexual abuse but I don’t think he said he would apologise and I advise you to listen to what the Pope says when he raises the issue.”

Father Lombardi later warned against pre-empting what the Pope might say, while speaking on ABC Radio’s AM program.

“The question is maybe also about the word ‘apology’ because maybe you expect some particular meaning,” he said.

“The Pope has explained very well already on the plane what he thinks about the problem. He has already said many things very clearly in the USA about this problem.”

‘Prevent, heal and reconcile’

But the pontiff was clear on Sunday when he told journalists in English that he would examine how the church can “prevent, heal and reconcile” the past crimes of the clergy.

“This is the essential content of what we will say as we apologise,” he said.

Father Lombardi, who speaks limited English, says the Pope will probably speak about sex abuse in the church during a meeting with bishops and Australian novices on Saturday.

It was in the same forum that the head of the Catholic Church apologised for the scourge during a visit to the United States earlier this year.

The Pope’s spokesman also says the pontiff is aware of the media coverage sexual abuse issues have been getting in Australia but will not directly intervene.

“Obviously he is informed but he respects very much the competence of the church in different lands,” he said.

He says the Pope fully supports the Archbishop of Sydney, Cardinal George Pell.

“Naturally, the Pope always support the bishops in the entire world because they are the collaborators and the guiders of the church.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/07/17/2306196.htm?section=australia

Bishop Fisher Says Activist Parents of Two Girls Repeatedly Raped by Priest are "Dwelling Crankily on Old Wounds"

July 17, 2008

This scoundrel, Bishop Anthony Fisher of Australia, who has mocked the Catholic parents of two girls who were repeatedly raped by a priest in a Catholic grade school in Australia–one of whom has since committed suicide–has taken the greatest care in designing a “World Youth Day” stations of the cross which doesn’t offend the tender sensibilities of the rabbis:

see:

Another Kosher Stations of the Cross Concocted for “World Youth Day”

Could you imagine Bishop Fisher dismissing the rabbis as “dwelling crankily on old wounds”? It seems to me that Bishop Fisher is operating from the principle that there are two classes of people, one with much higher value than the other. This is not a Christian principle. It’s a rabbinic principle.

Youth Day coordinator ‘misspoke on abuse’

Thu Jul 17, 2008

ABC News


World Youth Day organisers say comments made by the event’s coordinator about victims of sexual abuse do not represent his true attitude, as the Vatican casts doubt on whether the Pope will offer them a full apology.

Bishop Anthony Fisher yesterday said some people were “dwelling crankily on old wounds”, in response to fresh criticism about how the Catholic Church handles abuse by the clergy.

The remarks enraged advocates for sex abuse victims.

Bishop Fisher was referring to the case of two sisters who were repeatedly raped by abusive priest Father Kevin O’Donnell in Melbourne while they were in primary school.

Emma Foster committed suicide at the age of 26 earlier this year after suffering from anorexia and drug abuse.

Her younger sister, Katherine Foster, turned to alcohol and now needs 24-hour care after being hit by a car.

Their father, Anthony Foster, is on his way to Sydney from Britain, seeking an audience with Sydney’s Archbishop, Cardinal George Pell, or Pope Benedict.

Mr Foster has told ABC TV’s Lateline program he is calling for changes in the way the Church deals with victims.

The chief operational officer of World Youth Day, Danny Casey, has defended Bishop Fisher after the event coordinator yesterday expressed disappointment the issue had been raised during celebrations.

“If Bishop Anthony made particular comments about how some in the media seek to portray the church during abuse matters, he’s a man of deep compassion, I know he feels great compassion and sympathy for the victims and for all those who have been hurt through abuse,” he said.

Father Kevin O’Donnell was never tried on the Foster case but was convicted for other child sex crimes in 1995 and sent to jail. He died in 1997.

Cardinal Pell apologised to the Foster sisters as Archbishop of Melbourne in 1998. He encouraged the family to enter the Towards Healing Program, which capped compensation payments at $50,000.

The family rejected the offer, instead opting to pursue the Catholic Church through the courts for eight years. They eventually negotiated a settlement, believed to be the largest compensation pay-out of its kind in Australia.

Despite an earlier admission and an apology from Cardinal Pell, the Church’s lawyers later denied any admissions had been made about the abuse of the two girls.

Apology in doubt

Meanwhile, Pope Benedict’s spokesman has raised doubts over whether the pontiff will offer a full and unreserved apology for sexual abuse by clergymen during his visit to Sydney.

The contradictory signal came just three days after the pontiff himself, during his flight to Sydney, said he would apologise.

The director of the Vatican press office, Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, says the Pope has not given a commitment he will apologise to abuse victims and may simply refer to the issue in a “statement”.

“I draw your attention to the term ‘apology’ that journalists are using,” Father Lombardi said in Italian during a press conference.

“The Pope in the plane [to Australia] spoke of the problems of sexual abuse but I don’t think he said he would apologise and I advise you to listen to what the Pope says when he raises the issue.”

Father Lombardi later warned against pre-empting what the Pope might say, while speaking on ABC Radio’s AM program.

“The question is maybe also about the word ‘apology’ because maybe you expect some particular meaning,” he said.

“The Pope has explained very well already on the plane what he thinks about the problem. He has already said many things very clearly in the USA about this problem.”

‘Prevent, heal and reconcile’

But the pontiff was clear on Sunday when he told journalists in English that he would examine how the church can “prevent, heal and reconcile” the past crimes of the clergy.

“This is the essential content of what we will say as we apologise,” he said.

Father Lombardi, who speaks limited English, says the Pope will probably speak about sex abuse in the church during a meeting with bishops and Australian novices on Saturday.

It was in the same forum that the head of the Catholic Church apologised for the scourge during a visit to the United States earlier this year.

The Pope’s spokesman also says the pontiff is aware of the media coverage sexual abuse issues have been getting in Australia but will not directly intervene.

“Obviously he is informed but he respects very much the competence of the church in different lands,” he said.

He says the Pope fully supports the Archbishop of Sydney, Cardinal George Pell.

“Naturally, the Pope always support the bishops in the entire world because they are the collaborators and the guiders of the church.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/07/17/2306196.htm?section=australia

Bishop Fisher Says Activist Parents of Two Girls Repeatedly Raped by Priest are "Dwelling Crankily on Old Wounds"

July 17, 2008

This scoundrel, Bishop Anthony Fisher of Australia, who has mocked the Catholic parents of two girls who were repeatedly raped by a priest in a Catholic grade school in Australia–one of whom has since committed suicide–has taken the greatest care in designing a “World Youth Day” stations of the cross which doesn’t offend the tender sensibilities of the rabbis:

see:

Another Kosher Stations of the Cross Concocted for “World Youth Day”

Could you imagine Bishop Fisher dismissing the rabbis as “dwelling crankily on old wounds”? It seems to me that Bishop Fisher is operating from the principle that there are two classes of people, one with much higher value than the other. This is not a Christian principle. It’s a rabbinic principle.

Youth Day coordinator ‘misspoke on abuse’

Thu Jul 17, 2008

ABC News


World Youth Day organisers say comments made by the event’s coordinator about victims of sexual abuse do not represent his true attitude, as the Vatican casts doubt on whether the Pope will offer them a full apology.

Bishop Anthony Fisher yesterday said some people were “dwelling crankily on old wounds”, in response to fresh criticism about how the Catholic Church handles abuse by the clergy.

The remarks enraged advocates for sex abuse victims.

Bishop Fisher was referring to the case of two sisters who were repeatedly raped by abusive priest Father Kevin O’Donnell in Melbourne while they were in primary school.

Emma Foster committed suicide at the age of 26 earlier this year after suffering from anorexia and drug abuse.

Her younger sister, Katherine Foster, turned to alcohol and now needs 24-hour care after being hit by a car.

Their father, Anthony Foster, is on his way to Sydney from Britain, seeking an audience with Sydney’s Archbishop, Cardinal George Pell, or Pope Benedict.

Mr Foster has told ABC TV’s Lateline program he is calling for changes in the way the Church deals with victims.

The chief operational officer of World Youth Day, Danny Casey, has defended Bishop Fisher after the event coordinator yesterday expressed disappointment the issue had been raised during celebrations.

“If Bishop Anthony made particular comments about how some in the media seek to portray the church during abuse matters, he’s a man of deep compassion, I know he feels great compassion and sympathy for the victims and for all those who have been hurt through abuse,” he said.

Father Kevin O’Donnell was never tried on the Foster case but was convicted for other child sex crimes in 1995 and sent to jail. He died in 1997.

Cardinal Pell apologised to the Foster sisters as Archbishop of Melbourne in 1998. He encouraged the family to enter the Towards Healing Program, which capped compensation payments at $50,000.

The family rejected the offer, instead opting to pursue the Catholic Church through the courts for eight years. They eventually negotiated a settlement, believed to be the largest compensation pay-out of its kind in Australia.

Despite an earlier admission and an apology from Cardinal Pell, the Church’s lawyers later denied any admissions had been made about the abuse of the two girls.

Apology in doubt

Meanwhile, Pope Benedict’s spokesman has raised doubts over whether the pontiff will offer a full and unreserved apology for sexual abuse by clergymen during his visit to Sydney.

The contradictory signal came just three days after the pontiff himself, during his flight to Sydney, said he would apologise.

The director of the Vatican press office, Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, says the Pope has not given a commitment he will apologise to abuse victims and may simply refer to the issue in a “statement”.

“I draw your attention to the term ‘apology’ that journalists are using,” Father Lombardi said in Italian during a press conference.

“The Pope in the plane [to Australia] spoke of the problems of sexual abuse but I don’t think he said he would apologise and I advise you to listen to what the Pope says when he raises the issue.”

Father Lombardi later warned against pre-empting what the Pope might say, while speaking on ABC Radio’s AM program.

“The question is maybe also about the word ‘apology’ because maybe you expect some particular meaning,” he said.

“The Pope has explained very well already on the plane what he thinks about the problem. He has already said many things very clearly in the USA about this problem.”

‘Prevent, heal and reconcile’

But the pontiff was clear on Sunday when he told journalists in English that he would examine how the church can “prevent, heal and reconcile” the past crimes of the clergy.

“This is the essential content of what we will say as we apologise,” he said.

Father Lombardi, who speaks limited English, says the Pope will probably speak about sex abuse in the church during a meeting with bishops and Australian novices on Saturday.

It was in the same forum that the head of the Catholic Church apologised for the scourge during a visit to the United States earlier this year.

The Pope’s spokesman also says the pontiff is aware of the media coverage sexual abuse issues have been getting in Australia but will not directly intervene.

“Obviously he is informed but he respects very much the competence of the church in different lands,” he said.

He says the Pope fully supports the Archbishop of Sydney, Cardinal George Pell.

“Naturally, the Pope always support the bishops in the entire world because they are the collaborators and the guiders of the church.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/07/17/2306196.htm?section=australia

Bishop Fisher Says Activist Parents of Two Girls Repeatedly Raped by Priest are "Dwelling Crankily on Old Wounds"

July 17, 2008

This scoundrel, Bishop Anthony Fisher of Australia, who has mocked the Catholic parents of two girls who were repeatedly raped by a priest in a Catholic grade school in Australia–one of whom has since committed suicide–has taken the greatest care in designing a “World Youth Day” stations of the cross which doesn’t offend the tender sensibilities of the rabbis:

see:

Another Kosher Stations of the Cross Concocted for “World Youth Day”

Could you imagine Bishop Fisher dismissing the rabbis as “dwelling crankily on old wounds”? It seems to me that Bishop Fisher is operating from the principle that there are two classes of people, one with much higher value than the other. This is not a Christian principle. It’s a rabbinic principle.

Youth Day coordinator ‘misspoke on abuse’

Thu Jul 17, 2008

ABC News


World Youth Day organisers say comments made by the event’s coordinator about victims of sexual abuse do not represent his true attitude, as the Vatican casts doubt on whether the Pope will offer them a full apology.

Bishop Anthony Fisher yesterday said some people were “dwelling crankily on old wounds”, in response to fresh criticism about how the Catholic Church handles abuse by the clergy.

The remarks enraged advocates for sex abuse victims.

Bishop Fisher was referring to the case of two sisters who were repeatedly raped by abusive priest Father Kevin O’Donnell in Melbourne while they were in primary school.

Emma Foster committed suicide at the age of 26 earlier this year after suffering from anorexia and drug abuse.

Her younger sister, Katherine Foster, turned to alcohol and now needs 24-hour care after being hit by a car.

Their father, Anthony Foster, is on his way to Sydney from Britain, seeking an audience with Sydney’s Archbishop, Cardinal George Pell, or Pope Benedict.

Mr Foster has told ABC TV’s Lateline program he is calling for changes in the way the Church deals with victims.

The chief operational officer of World Youth Day, Danny Casey, has defended Bishop Fisher after the event coordinator yesterday expressed disappointment the issue had been raised during celebrations.

“If Bishop Anthony made particular comments about how some in the media seek to portray the church during abuse matters, he’s a man of deep compassion, I know he feels great compassion and sympathy for the victims and for all those who have been hurt through abuse,” he said.

Father Kevin O’Donnell was never tried on the Foster case but was convicted for other child sex crimes in 1995 and sent to jail. He died in 1997.

Cardinal Pell apologised to the Foster sisters as Archbishop of Melbourne in 1998. He encouraged the family to enter the Towards Healing Program, which capped compensation payments at $50,000.

The family rejected the offer, instead opting to pursue the Catholic Church through the courts for eight years. They eventually negotiated a settlement, believed to be the largest compensation pay-out of its kind in Australia.

Despite an earlier admission and an apology from Cardinal Pell, the Church’s lawyers later denied any admissions had been made about the abuse of the two girls.

Apology in doubt

Meanwhile, Pope Benedict’s spokesman has raised doubts over whether the pontiff will offer a full and unreserved apology for sexual abuse by clergymen during his visit to Sydney.

The contradictory signal came just three days after the pontiff himself, during his flight to Sydney, said he would apologise.

The director of the Vatican press office, Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, says the Pope has not given a commitment he will apologise to abuse victims and may simply refer to the issue in a “statement”.

“I draw your attention to the term ‘apology’ that journalists are using,” Father Lombardi said in Italian during a press conference.

“The Pope in the plane [to Australia] spoke of the problems of sexual abuse but I don’t think he said he would apologise and I advise you to listen to what the Pope says when he raises the issue.”

Father Lombardi later warned against pre-empting what the Pope might say, while speaking on ABC Radio’s AM program.

“The question is maybe also about the word ‘apology’ because maybe you expect some particular meaning,” he said.

“The Pope has explained very well already on the plane what he thinks about the problem. He has already said many things very clearly in the USA about this problem.”

‘Prevent, heal and reconcile’

But the pontiff was clear on Sunday when he told journalists in English that he would examine how the church can “prevent, heal and reconcile” the past crimes of the clergy.

“This is the essential content of what we will say as we apologise,” he said.

Father Lombardi, who speaks limited English, says the Pope will probably speak about sex abuse in the church during a meeting with bishops and Australian novices on Saturday.

It was in the same forum that the head of the Catholic Church apologised for the scourge during a visit to the United States earlier this year.

The Pope’s spokesman also says the pontiff is aware of the media coverage sexual abuse issues have been getting in Australia but will not directly intervene.

“Obviously he is informed but he respects very much the competence of the church in different lands,” he said.

He says the Pope fully supports the Archbishop of Sydney, Cardinal George Pell.

“Naturally, the Pope always support the bishops in the entire world because they are the collaborators and the guiders of the church.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/07/17/2306196.htm?section=australia

Another Kosher Stations of the Cross Concocted for "World Youth Day"

May 28, 2008

In only 3 years’ time Benedict has far surpassed his predecessor in the areas of false ecumenism and philo-rabbinism, but he uses a traditional pastoral cross and vestments as compensation. Evidently, most church-goers are ripe for this swindle.

Will this upcoming Kosher-slaughtered version of the stations of the cross surpass last year’s rendition in which Christ’s suffering was relativised with WWII suffering of the so-called “Jews”?

See:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/04/benedicts-kosher-via-crucis.html

Catholic Church opts for diplomatic scripts so no one will get cross

Linda Morris – Sydney Morning Herald

May 29, 2008

… The church has changed one of its most popular devotions and a landmark event of World Youth Day to take account of the sensitivities of Jews and draw other Christian denominations into its youth celebrations.

In the Catholic tradition the Stations of the Cross, the depiction of the final hours of Jesus Christ, features 14 scenes including the fall of Jesus three times – but only eight have scriptural foundation. To make the event more appealing to all Christians, a Vatican-approved scriptural version, founded entirely on passages from the New Testament, will be adopted when it is staged in the streets of Sydney on July 18.

It is not the only concession the church is willing to make in the name of interfaith unity: scriptural texts, reflections and video commentaries will be carefully worked so that the scene at the Sydney Opera House in which Jesus is condemned does not incite anti-Semitic feeling.

The Pope will pray with Australian Christian leaders, including those from Anglican, Lutheran, Presbyterian and Eastern Rite churches in the St Mary’s Cathedral Crypt the morning of the Stations of the Cross. That will be followed by a meeting with the heads of non-Christian faiths, including the Islamic, Jewish, Buddhist and Hindu religions.

The Anglican Dean of Sydney, Phillip Jensen, has said he will not attend, and his brother, Dr Peter Jensen, the Archbishop, will be overseas, but the church expects a senior representative of Sydney Anglicans to attend.

The World Youth Day co-ordinator, Anthony Fisher, said all religions would receive a bounce from the public expression and celebration of faith.

“We’ve been in discussion with the Jewish community,” Bishop Fisher said. “We’re very conscious of the fear some people might have that enacting the Passion of Christ could incite anti-Semitic feelings and so we’ve had a long dialogue about how we can minimise any risk of that.

“We want to make it very clear to people that the Passion of Christ celebrated in the Stations of the Cross is not intended to be, is no excuse for being, an attack on anybody and certainly for nurturing any prejudices that people may have in their hearts.

“In the choice of scriptural texts you can choose ones that are less likely to be misinterpreted by people to encourage that kind of feeling and we’ve chosen those texts carefully and in consultation with others.”

Rabbi Jeremy Lawrence, senior rabbi of the Great Synagogue, said he had not seen the details but applauded the church’s attempts at positive dialogue between the two faiths. He had invited the Pope to visit the synagogue.

Bishop Fisher said invitations had yet to go out and it had not been decided whether the controversial Islamic cleric, the senior imam at the Lakemba Mosque, Sheik al-Hilaly would be among the invitees.

Malek Fahd Islamic School, a co-educational primary and high school in Greenacre, will host more than 300 Catholic pilgrims for the World Youth Day program.

The Catholic Archbishop, Cardinal George Pell, said internal research showed young Catholics were keen to bring non-Catholic friends to World Youth Day events …

http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/catholic-church-opts-for-diplomatic-scripts/2008/05/28/1211654124112.html

Another Kosher Stations of the Cross Concocted for "World Youth Day"

May 28, 2008

In only 3 years’ time Benedict has far surpassed his predecessor in the areas of false ecumenism and philo-rabbinism, but he uses a traditional pastoral cross and vestments as compensation. Evidently, most church-goers are ripe for this swindle.

Will this upcoming Kosher-slaughtered version of the stations of the cross surpass last year’s rendition in which Christ’s suffering was relativised with WWII suffering of the so-called “Jews”?

See:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/04/benedicts-kosher-via-crucis.html

Catholic Church opts for diplomatic scripts so no one will get cross

Linda Morris – Sydney Morning Herald

May 29, 2008

… The church has changed one of its most popular devotions and a landmark event of World Youth Day to take account of the sensitivities of Jews and draw other Christian denominations into its youth celebrations.

In the Catholic tradition the Stations of the Cross, the depiction of the final hours of Jesus Christ, features 14 scenes including the fall of Jesus three times – but only eight have scriptural foundation. To make the event more appealing to all Christians, a Vatican-approved scriptural version, founded entirely on passages from the New Testament, will be adopted when it is staged in the streets of Sydney on July 18.

It is not the only concession the church is willing to make in the name of interfaith unity: scriptural texts, reflections and video commentaries will be carefully worked so that the scene at the Sydney Opera House in which Jesus is condemned does not incite anti-Semitic feeling.

The Pope will pray with Australian Christian leaders, including those from Anglican, Lutheran, Presbyterian and Eastern Rite churches in the St Mary’s Cathedral Crypt the morning of the Stations of the Cross. That will be followed by a meeting with the heads of non-Christian faiths, including the Islamic, Jewish, Buddhist and Hindu religions.

The Anglican Dean of Sydney, Phillip Jensen, has said he will not attend, and his brother, Dr Peter Jensen, the Archbishop, will be overseas, but the church expects a senior representative of Sydney Anglicans to attend.

The World Youth Day co-ordinator, Anthony Fisher, said all religions would receive a bounce from the public expression and celebration of faith.

“We’ve been in discussion with the Jewish community,” Bishop Fisher said. “We’re very conscious of the fear some people might have that enacting the Passion of Christ could incite anti-Semitic feelings and so we’ve had a long dialogue about how we can minimise any risk of that.

“We want to make it very clear to people that the Passion of Christ celebrated in the Stations of the Cross is not intended to be, is no excuse for being, an attack on anybody and certainly for nurturing any prejudices that people may have in their hearts.

“In the choice of scriptural texts you can choose ones that are less likely to be misinterpreted by people to encourage that kind of feeling and we’ve chosen those texts carefully and in consultation with others.”

Rabbi Jeremy Lawrence, senior rabbi of the Great Synagogue, said he had not seen the details but applauded the church’s attempts at positive dialogue between the two faiths. He had invited the Pope to visit the synagogue.

Bishop Fisher said invitations had yet to go out and it had not been decided whether the controversial Islamic cleric, the senior imam at the Lakemba Mosque, Sheik al-Hilaly would be among the invitees.

Malek Fahd Islamic School, a co-educational primary and high school in Greenacre, will host more than 300 Catholic pilgrims for the World Youth Day program.

The Catholic Archbishop, Cardinal George Pell, said internal research showed young Catholics were keen to bring non-Catholic friends to World Youth Day events …

http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/catholic-church-opts-for-diplomatic-scripts/2008/05/28/1211654124112.html

Benedict’s Kosher Via Crucis

April 7, 2007

Pope makes Nazi atrocities part of Stations of the Cross

Pope speaks of Nazi atrocities in Easter ritual
By Malcolm Moore in Rome
April 7, 2007 Daily Telegraph (UK)

The Pope shocked many Catholics last night with a dramatically revised version of the Stations of the Cross, one of the central rituals of the Easter ceremony. The ceremony, also known as the Via Crucis, recreates Jesus’s path on the day of his death from the Antonia fortress to Golgotha, where he was crucified.

The Pope carried the cross for the first and last of the 14 stops on a candle-lit procession around the Coliseum in Rome. However, this year the Pope chose to change both the route and the content of the ceremony. The Vatican said the changes were designed to reflect the gospels more truly and to link Jesus’s suffering with the suffering of mankind today.

One of the boldest changes came on the third stop, where Jesus is given up to Pontius Pilate by the Sanhedrin, a council of Jews. The Pope recalled the sentence that was passed over the Jews by the Nazis, and their suffering in concentration camps. He quoted Etty Hilesum, a Dutch Jew, who was executed in Auschwitz in 1943, saying: “We must oppose every new horror and crime with a new piece of the truth and goodness. We may suffer, but we must not succumb.”

Monsignor Gianfranco Ravasi, the prefect of the Ambrosian Library in Milan and a member of the Pontifical Biblical Commission, was asked by the Pope to update the ceremony. He said: “I did not want the ceremony just to be a simple recollection of a past event. I wanted worshippers to feel and live through the raw and bitter reality like a neighbour.”

The new changes also included cutting the stop where Jesus drops the Cross, as well as a reference to St Veronica, who mopped Jesus’s brow. St Veronica is merely apocryphal and not mentioned in the gospels.

However, a reference to Judas Iscariot was inserted for the first time because, in the words of Mgr Ravasi, “dawn follows night, out of darkness comes light, and after betrayal comes penitence.” Later, on the ninth stop, where Jesus met a group of women, the Pope spoke out against the suffering of “violated” women. He recalled the women “who have been subjected to tribal practices”, the mothers in crisis and alone, “the Jewish or Palestinian mothers and those in all lands ravaged by war, the widows and old ladies forgotten by their children”.The ceremony ended with St Matthew’s Passion by Bach. (Emphasis supplied)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/04/07/weaster07.xml

Benedict’s Kosher Via Crucis

April 7, 2007

Pope makes Nazi atrocities part of Stations of the Cross

Pope speaks of Nazi atrocities in Easter ritual
By Malcolm Moore in Rome
April 7, 2007 Daily Telegraph (UK)

The Pope shocked many Catholics last night with a dramatically revised version of the Stations of the Cross, one of the central rituals of the Easter ceremony. The ceremony, also known as the Via Crucis, recreates Jesus’s path on the day of his death from the Antonia fortress to Golgotha, where he was crucified.

The Pope carried the cross for the first and last of the 14 stops on a candle-lit procession around the Coliseum in Rome. However, this year the Pope chose to change both the route and the content of the ceremony. The Vatican said the changes were designed to reflect the gospels more truly and to link Jesus’s suffering with the suffering of mankind today.

One of the boldest changes came on the third stop, where Jesus is given up to Pontius Pilate by the Sanhedrin, a council of Jews. The Pope recalled the sentence that was passed over the Jews by the Nazis, and their suffering in concentration camps. He quoted Etty Hilesum, a Dutch Jew, who was executed in Auschwitz in 1943, saying: “We must oppose every new horror and crime with a new piece of the truth and goodness. We may suffer, but we must not succumb.”

Monsignor Gianfranco Ravasi, the prefect of the Ambrosian Library in Milan and a member of the Pontifical Biblical Commission, was asked by the Pope to update the ceremony. He said: “I did not want the ceremony just to be a simple recollection of a past event. I wanted worshippers to feel and live through the raw and bitter reality like a neighbour.”

The new changes also included cutting the stop where Jesus drops the Cross, as well as a reference to St Veronica, who mopped Jesus’s brow. St Veronica is merely apocryphal and not mentioned in the gospels.

However, a reference to Judas Iscariot was inserted for the first time because, in the words of Mgr Ravasi, “dawn follows night, out of darkness comes light, and after betrayal comes penitence.” Later, on the ninth stop, where Jesus met a group of women, the Pope spoke out against the suffering of “violated” women. He recalled the women “who have been subjected to tribal practices”, the mothers in crisis and alone, “the Jewish or Palestinian mothers and those in all lands ravaged by war, the widows and old ladies forgotten by their children”.The ceremony ended with St Matthew’s Passion by Bach.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/04/07/weaster07.xml

Benedict’s Kosher Via Crucis

April 7, 2007

Pope makes Nazi atrocities part of Stations of the Cross

Pope speaks of Nazi atrocities in Easter ritual
By Malcolm Moore in Rome
April 7, 2007 Daily Telegraph (UK)

The Pope shocked many Catholics last night with a dramatically revised version of the Stations of the Cross, one of the central rituals of the Easter ceremony. The ceremony, also known as the Via Crucis, recreates Jesus’s path on the day of his death from the Antonia fortress to Golgotha, where he was crucified.

The Pope carried the cross for the first and last of the 14 stops on a candle-lit procession around the Coliseum in Rome. However, this year the Pope chose to change both the route and the content of the ceremony. The Vatican said the changes were designed to reflect the gospels more truly and to link Jesus’s suffering with the suffering of mankind today.

One of the boldest changes came on the third stop, where Jesus is given up to Pontius Pilate by the Sanhedrin, a council of Jews. The Pope recalled the sentence that was passed over the Jews by the Nazis, and their suffering in concentration camps. He quoted Etty Hilesum, a Dutch Jew, who was executed in Auschwitz in 1943, saying: “We must oppose every new horror and crime with a new piece of the truth and goodness. We may suffer, but we must not succumb.”

Monsignor Gianfranco Ravasi, the prefect of the Ambrosian Library in Milan and a member of the Pontifical Biblical Commission, was asked by the Pope to update the ceremony. He said: “I did not want the ceremony just to be a simple recollection of a past event. I wanted worshippers to feel and live through the raw and bitter reality like a neighbour.”

The new changes also included cutting the stop where Jesus drops the Cross, as well as a reference to St Veronica, who mopped Jesus’s brow. St Veronica is merely apocryphal and not mentioned in the gospels.

However, a reference to Judas Iscariot was inserted for the first time because, in the words of Mgr Ravasi, “dawn follows night, out of darkness comes light, and after betrayal comes penitence.” Later, on the ninth stop, where Jesus met a group of women, the Pope spoke out against the suffering of “violated” women. He recalled the women “who have been subjected to tribal practices”, the mothers in crisis and alone, “the Jewish or Palestinian mothers and those in all lands ravaged by war, the widows and old ladies forgotten by their children”.The ceremony ended with St Matthew’s Passion by Bach.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/04/07/weaster07.xml