Archive for the ‘Shulchan Arukh’ Category

More Signs of What to Expect from the October Synod

January 31, 2008

Background on this HERE and HERE. Apparently Cardinal Martini, who has called for this synod, intends that Christians learn from post-Temple rabbinic teaching. And note that Martini claims that the focus of this synod is to bring all things Catholic more into keeping with scripture–this even as it is reported that the scripture-based language of the Good Friday prayer for the conversion of the Jews from the 1962 Latin missal will be altered to suit modern, non-biblical sensibilities.

Italian cardinal hopes synod helps draw Catholics closer to Scripture

By Cindy Wooden

Catholic News Service–Jan-31-2008

ROME (CNS) — Italian Cardinal Carlo Maria Martini, the retired archbishop of Milan and biblical scholar who repeatedly asked for a world Synod of Bishops on the Bible, said he hopes October’s synod on the topic will focus on practical pastoral initiatives to bring Catholics closer to the Scriptures.

The Oct. 5-26 synod should be “a pastoral discernment” aimed at helping the church offer Catholics “authentic itineraries of worship, prayer and service” based on the Bible, he said in an article published in La Civilta Cattolica, a Jesuit journal reviewed by the Vatican prior to publication.

Cardinal Martini said the synod also should be an “examination of conscience” of how well the church has put into practice the teachings of the Second Vatican Council’s document on divine revelation, “Dei Verbum.”

A chapter of the synod outline or “lineamenta,” published last April, focused on how the church nourishes itself with the word of God “in liturgy and in prayer, in evangelization and catechesis, in exegesis and in theology, and in the life of the believer,” he said.

“I think that all of these areas are important and deserve the attention of the synod fathers,” the cardinal said, particularly because too many Catholics still do not read the Bible on their own or in groups and only hear the Scriptures at Mass.

The cardinal said he hoped the synod would avoid “prolonged and abstract” discussions on matters already dealt with by the Second Vatican Council, such as the relationship between Scripture and tradition, or an examination of particular methods of biblical interpretation and scholarship.

Also, he said, focusing on “The Word of God in the Life and Mission of the Church,” the synod’s theme, the gathering should avoid placing an emphasis on “individual revealed truths,” looking instead at the fact that God has revealed himself through the Scriptures.

Cardinal Martini said he hoped the synod would come up with concrete suggestions for bringing the Bible closer to the lives of Catholics.

He said his first suggestion would be that even at a daily Mass, where homilies usually are not given, the celebrant should offer a brief reflection — “no longer than three minutes” — on the day’s Scripture readings.

A more difficult, but essential task, he said, is finding ways to help Catholics learn to pray with the Scriptures during their private prayers.

Cardinal Martini, who taught in Jerusalem and lives there much of the year, said the synod also must remind Catholics how much the Jewish tradition and modern Jewish scholarship have to teach them about the Bible, particularly the Old Testament.

“It is not enough to avoid any anti-Semitic feelings,” he said. “One must reach the point of loving the Jewish people and all the expressions of their life and culture: their literature, art, folklore and religiousness. Only then can we establish those ties that will lead not only to overcoming mistrust and prejudices, but to collaborating for the good of humanity.”

http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/0800593.htm

More Signs of What to Expect from the October Synod

January 31, 2008

Background on this HERE and HERE. Apparently Cardinal Martini, who has called for this synod, intends that Christians learn from post-Temple rabbinic teaching. And note that Martini claims that the focus of this synod is to bring all things Catholic more into keeping with scripture–this even as it is reported that the scripture-based language of the Good Friday prayer for the conversion of the Jews from the 1962 Latin missal will be altered to suit modern, non-biblical sensibilities.

Italian cardinal hopes synod helps draw Catholics closer to Scripture

By Cindy Wooden

Catholic News Service–Jan-31-2008

ROME (CNS) — Italian Cardinal Carlo Maria Martini, the retired archbishop of Milan and biblical scholar who repeatedly asked for a world Synod of Bishops on the Bible, said he hopes October’s synod on the topic will focus on practical pastoral initiatives to bring Catholics closer to the Scriptures.

The Oct. 5-26 synod should be “a pastoral discernment” aimed at helping the church offer Catholics “authentic itineraries of worship, prayer and service” based on the Bible, he said in an article published in La Civilta Cattolica, a Jesuit journal reviewed by the Vatican prior to publication.

Cardinal Martini said the synod also should be an “examination of conscience” of how well the church has put into practice the teachings of the Second Vatican Council’s document on divine revelation, “Dei Verbum.”

A chapter of the synod outline or “lineamenta,” published last April, focused on how the church nourishes itself with the word of God “in liturgy and in prayer, in evangelization and catechesis, in exegesis and in theology, and in the life of the believer,” he said.

“I think that all of these areas are important and deserve the attention of the synod fathers,” the cardinal said, particularly because too many Catholics still do not read the Bible on their own or in groups and only hear the Scriptures at Mass.

The cardinal said he hoped the synod would avoid “prolonged and abstract” discussions on matters already dealt with by the Second Vatican Council, such as the relationship between Scripture and tradition, or an examination of particular methods of biblical interpretation and scholarship.

Also, he said, focusing on “The Word of God in the Life and Mission of the Church,” the synod’s theme, the gathering should avoid placing an emphasis on “individual revealed truths,” looking instead at the fact that God has revealed himself through the Scriptures.

Cardinal Martini said he hoped the synod would come up with concrete suggestions for bringing the Bible closer to the lives of Catholics.

He said his first suggestion would be that even at a daily Mass, where homilies usually are not given, the celebrant should offer a brief reflection — “no longer than three minutes” — on the day’s Scripture readings.

A more difficult, but essential task, he said, is finding ways to help Catholics learn to pray with the Scriptures during their private prayers.

Cardinal Martini, who taught in Jerusalem and lives there much of the year, said the synod also must remind Catholics how much the Jewish tradition and modern Jewish scholarship have to teach them about the Bible, particularly the Old Testament.

“It is not enough to avoid any anti-Semitic feelings,” he said. “One must reach the point of loving the Jewish people and all the expressions of their life and culture: their literature, art, folklore and religiousness. Only then can we establish those ties that will lead not only to overcoming mistrust and prejudices, but to collaborating for the good of humanity.”

http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/0800593.htm

The Israeli "Defense" Force’s Hasidic Snipers

January 24, 2008

The media for goys disassociates the Israeli military with Judaism making it appear to be a modern, secular organization as a means of disassociating IDF racism and brutality from the rabbinic tradition which it is rooted in. Not so in the Judaic media.

Talmud studies credited for sniper excellence

Jerusalem Post

Jan 21, 2008

While members of the Nahal Haredi Battalion have decided to abandon the yeshiva benches in exchange for an M-16 rifle in the IDF, their past study of intricate Talmudic passages is assisting them today in turning into top-of-the-line combat soldiers.

Last week, soldiers from the battalion – also known as Netzah Yehuda – came in first place in a sharp-shooting course at the Adam Training Facility near Modi’in.

Representatives of the Golani and Givati Brigades also participated in the course, during which soldiers are trained to become sharpshooters and are taught to use mathematical equations to calculate the affect wind and distance will have on their shot.

Nahal Haredi, which belongs to the Kfir Brigade and is based in the Jordan Valley, was established eight years ago as a single company. Today it is a full battalion with three companies and an elite counterterror squad.

Most of the battalion’s 700 soldiers are recruited in Israel and come from a haredi or national religious background.

A Haredi source involved with the battalion said Monday that the soldiers’ impressive results were due to their past Talmud studies, which helped them develop analytical skills.

The source said the battalion’s scores were the best obtained this past year at the facility.

“Since the soldiers are haredi, they never really studied advanced math,” the source said. “The course trainers broke their heads trying to figure out how the soldiers caught on so quickly until they realized that due to their experience studying Talmud it was a piece of cake for them to understand how to solve the complicated equations.”

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=1200572510223&pagename=JPost%2FJPArticle%2FShowFull

The Israeli "Defense" Force’s Hasidic Snipers

January 24, 2008

The media for goys disassociates the Israeli military with Judaism making it appear to be a modern, secular organization as a means of disassociating IDF racism and brutality from the rabbinic tradition which it is rooted in. Not so in the Judaic media.

Talmud studies credited for sniper excellence

Jerusalem Post

Jan 21, 2008

While members of the Nahal Haredi Battalion have decided to abandon the yeshiva benches in exchange for an M-16 rifle in the IDF, their past study of intricate Talmudic passages is assisting them today in turning into top-of-the-line combat soldiers.

Last week, soldiers from the battalion – also known as Netzah Yehuda – came in first place in a sharp-shooting course at the Adam Training Facility near Modi’in.

Representatives of the Golani and Givati Brigades also participated in the course, during which soldiers are trained to become sharpshooters and are taught to use mathematical equations to calculate the affect wind and distance will have on their shot.

Nahal Haredi, which belongs to the Kfir Brigade and is based in the Jordan Valley, was established eight years ago as a single company. Today it is a full battalion with three companies and an elite counterterror squad.

Most of the battalion’s 700 soldiers are recruited in Israel and come from a haredi or national religious background.

A Haredi source involved with the battalion said Monday that the soldiers’ impressive results were due to their past Talmud studies, which helped them develop analytical skills.

The source said the battalion’s scores were the best obtained this past year at the facility.

“Since the soldiers are haredi, they never really studied advanced math,” the source said. “The course trainers broke their heads trying to figure out how the soldiers caught on so quickly until they realized that due to their experience studying Talmud it was a piece of cake for them to understand how to solve the complicated equations.”

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=1200572510223&pagename=JPost%2FJPArticle%2FShowFull

Open Letter to the "Levelheaded Rabbi"

July 23, 2007

“… if we are going to sit down with the Vatican to negotiate liturgy, should we, l’havdil, offer to take out the second paragraph of Aleinu, in which we pray for the day when gentiles will stop worshipping idols? How about “sheheim mishtachavim” – the line that Christian censors removed from Aleinu, claiming it insulted Christians? Many of us have put it back. Should we allow the Vatican to dictate what we say in our prayers? Or should we, perhaps, do a line-by-line analysis of the Talmud to make sure there is nothing there that people may find offensive?” (Rabbi Yerachmiel Seplowitz, “The Pope’s Got A Point,” The Jewish Press, Wednesday, July 18, 2007)

http://www.jewishpress.com/page.do/22275/The_Pope’s_Got_A_Point.html

I’m afraid that can of worms has already been opened, dear Rabbi Seplowitz. Not that you have anything to fear from your guys in the Vatican, but there are many commoners–am haaretz–who are picking up the slack for the Vatican and doing long overdue line-by-line analysis of not only the Talmud, but the entire corpus of Judaic texts, and uncovering the very things which you quite apparently fear could be exposed.

But don’t worry. We wouldn’t think of attempting to censor your offensive texts, much less confiscating and burning them, even if we had the means. History has proven such heavy-handed methods to be ineffective. Vatican censorship failed (and Judaic imprisonment of “holocaust deniers” and confiscation of their books will also fail, by the way). Indeed, you can thank the Vatican censors for buying you and your fellow rabbis a few extra centuries of cover for your thoroughly offensive texts precisely by censoring them. It was such a great idea that the rabbis continued to do it themselves, even after the demise of the Catholic states, producing sanitized “Talmuds” for goy consumption, such as the Rodkinson “Talmud”–a favorite among Talmud apologists who disingenuously use it to “prove” that those troublesome Talmud quotes about child rape, lying, cheating, killing, etc., are “antisemitic fabrications.”

No, we don’t intend to hide what we’re learning from the public. What we have planned is full disclosure, as it should be. There will be transparency in Judaism as there is in other religions; no more secret society stuff.

You can thank your fellow rabbis and their ever-so-characteristic insane overreaching for sparking our newfound interest. Were it not for their cosmic-proportioned chutzpah most of us would likely be going about our am haaretz lives not even concerned about what the Talmud contains, probably not even knowing what the Talmud is.

Behind your pose as the “levelheaded rabbi” there are, of course, selfish motives, likely based in fear. But if my intuition is correct, you have nothing to fear in the way of pogroms or book burnings. What you have to fear is the worst possible thing of all that could happen to a rabbi: the truth about the rabbinic tradition being widely exposed. God willing, the fact that your “holy” texts sanction child rape and the fact that you, Rabbi Seplowitz, as a mohel, get paid to put your mouth on the bleeding, circumcised penises of baby boys will be as commonly known as the Christian belief in the divinity of Jesus Christ.

Shalom aleichem, “elder brother” Rabbi Seplowitz.

Open Letter to the "Levelheaded Rabbi"

July 23, 2007

“… if we are going to sit down with the Vatican to negotiate liturgy, should we, l’havdil, offer to take out the second paragraph of Aleinu, in which we pray for the day when gentiles will stop worshipping idols? How about “sheheim mishtachavim” – the line that Christian censors removed from Aleinu, claiming it insulted Christians? Many of us have put it back. Should we allow the Vatican to dictate what we say in our prayers? Or should we, perhaps, do a line-by-line analysis of the Talmud to make sure there is nothing there that people may find offensive?” (Rabbi Yerachmiel Seplowitz, “The Pope’s Got A Point,” The Jewish Press, Wednesday, July 18, 2007)

http://www.jewishpress.com/page.do/22275/The_Pope’s_Got_A_Point.html

I’m afraid that can of worms has already been opened, dear Rabbi Seplowitz. Not that you have anything to fear from your guys in the Vatican, but there are many commoners–am haaretz–who are picking up the slack for the Vatican and doing long overdue line-by-line analysis of not only the Talmud, but the entire corpus of Judaic texts, and uncovering the very things which you quite apparently fear could be exposed.

But don’t worry. We wouldn’t think of attempting to censor your offensive texts, much less confiscating and burning them, even if we had the means. History has proven such heavy-handed methods to be ineffective. Vatican censorship failed (and Judaic imprisonment of “holocaust deniers” and confiscation of their books will also fail, by the way). Indeed, you can thank the Vatican censors for buying you and your fellow rabbis a few extra centuries of cover for your thoroughly offensive texts precisely by censoring them. It was such a great idea that the rabbis continued to do it themselves, even after the demise of the Catholic states, producing sanitized “Talmuds” for goy consumption, such as the Rodkinson “Talmud”–a favorite among Talmud apologists who disingenuously use it to “prove” that those troublesome Talmud quotes about child rape, lying, cheating, killing, etc., are “antisemitic fabrications.”

No, we don’t intend to hide what we’re learning from the public. What we have planned is full disclosure, as it should be. There will be transparency in Judaism as there is in other religions; no more secret society stuff.

You can thank your fellow rabbis and their ever-so-characteristic insane overreaching for sparking our newfound interest. Were it not for their cosmos-proportioned chutzpah most of us would likely be going about our am haaretz lives not even concerned about what the Talmud contains, probably not even knowing what the Talmud is.

Behind your pose as the “levelheaded rabbi” there are, of course, selfish motives, likely based in fear. But if my intuition is correct, you have nothing to fear in the way of pogroms or book burnings. What you have to fear is the worst possible thing of all that could happen to a rabbi: the truth about the rabbinic tradition being widely exposed. God willing, the fact that your “holy” texts sanction child rape and the fact that you, Rabbi Seplowitz, as a mohel, get paid to put your mouth on the bleeding, circumcised penises of baby boys will be as commonly known as the Christian belief in the divinity of Jesus Christ.

Shalom aleichem, “elder brother” Rabbi Seplowitz.