Archive for the ‘Sanhedrin 43a’ Category

Australian Pharisees Suggest Christians Abandon the Gospel

June 1, 2008

In anticipation of a kosher, faux-ecumenical stations of the cross planned for “World Youth Day” in Australia, the modern Pharisees are saying in reference to Christ’s trial before the Sanhedrin:

“The historical and biblical questions surrounding the notion that there was a formal Sanhedrin trial argue for extreme caution and, perhaps, even abandoning the device.”

Really? I invite these Judaic leaders to tear the rabbinic account of Christ’s trial before the Sanhedrin out of their “holy” canon before they even think about approaching us with such a request, and even then I’d tell these phony “elder brothers” to get lost. The chutzpah knows no bounds. And the Vatican plays right along with it. The rabbis don’t question the historical reality of Christ’s trial before the Sanhedrin and subsequent execution. Among themselves, they revel in it. Read the Talmudic account of Christ’s trial before the Sanhedrin and execution here:

For the sake of His Passion

and how this rabbinic teaching is manifest:

The Crucifixion Narrative for Goys vs. the Crucifixion Narrative Which the Rabbis Maintain Amongst Themselves

Vic Alhadeff, the director of the New South Wales Jewish Board of Deputies is wailing of imminent Christian pogroms against “Jews” while in the real world Israeli Orthodox “Jews” are burning hundreds of New Testaments as a religious “mizvah.”

The Judaic canon is rotten with incitements to violence against “Gentiles,” particularly Christians. What is being done about that? The rabbis and the Vatican together are engaged in a cover-up of massive proportions here.

Papal show raises concerns in Sydney

A procession planned during a visit by Pope Benedict XVI could incite anti-Semitism, Australian Jewish leaders warned.

Roman Catholic officials in Sydney already have cut back a Stations of the Cross procession to be staged during the pope’s visit in July, from 14 stations to eight, but one segment still raises concerns, according to Vic Alhadeff, the director of the New South Wales Jewish Board of Deputies. It is the third station, where Jesus is condemned by the Sanhedrin, the ancient Jewish tribunal.

“We are concerned at how this scene will be dramatized if it is to be retained,” Alhadeff said after a May 20 board resolution expressed disappointment at its inclusion. “The historical and biblical questions surrounding the notion that there was a formal Sanhedrin trial argue for extreme caution and, perhaps, even abandoning the device,” the resolution said.

A spokesman for the procession’s organizers said that “we’ve accommodated them [the Jews] where appropriate, but we’re unable to change the New Testament. Ultimately, we’re acknowledging that Christ was crucified for and by all sinners.”

The July 18 event is expected to attract 500,000 pilgrims.

http://www.jta.org/cgi-bin/iowa/breaking/108842.html

Christ told Pilate “he that hath delivered me to thee [the Sanhedrin], hath the greater sin” (John 18;11). Nothing any rabbi or prelate–much less any Hollywood script-writer, establishment journalist, or “Judeo-Christian” book publisher–could say or do can ever change this.

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Australian Pharisees Suggest Christians Abandon the Gospel

June 1, 2008

In anticipation of a kosher, faux-ecumenical stations of the cross planned for “World Youth Day” in Australia, the modern Pharisees are saying in reference to Christ’s trial before the Sanhedrin:

“The historical and biblical questions surrounding the notion that there was a formal Sanhedrin trial argue for extreme caution and, perhaps, even abandoning the device.”

Really? I invite these Judaic leaders to tear the rabbinic account of Christ’s trial before the Sanhedrin out of their “holy” canon before they even think about approaching us with such a request, and even then I’d tell these phony “elder brothers” to get lost. The chutzpah knows no bounds. And the Vatican plays right along with it. The rabbis don’t question the historical reality of Christ’s trial before the Sanhedrin and subsequent execution. Among themselves, they revel in it. Read the Talmudic account of Christ’s trial before the Sanhedrin and execution here:

For the sake of His Passion

and how this rabbinic teaching is manifest:

The Crucifixion Narrative for Goys vs. the Crucifixion Narrative Which the Rabbis Maintain Amongst Themselves

Vic Alhadeff, the director of the New South Wales Jewish Board of Deputies is wailing of imminent Christian pogroms against “Jews” while in the real world Israeli Orthodox “Jews” are burning hundreds of New Testaments as a religious “mizvah.”

The Judaic canon is rotten with incitements to violence against “Gentiles,” particularly Christians. What is being done about that? The rabbis and the Vatican together are engaged in a cover-up of massive proportions here.

Papal show raises concerns in Sydney

A procession planned during a visit by Pope Benedict XVI could incite anti-Semitism, Australian Jewish leaders warned.

Roman Catholic officials in Sydney already have cut back a Stations of the Cross procession to be staged during the pope’s visit in July, from 14 stations to eight, but one segment still raises concerns, according to Vic Alhadeff, the director of the New South Wales Jewish Board of Deputies. It is the third station, where Jesus is condemned by the Sanhedrin, the ancient Jewish tribunal.

“We are concerned at how this scene will be dramatized if it is to be retained,” Alhadeff said after a May 20 board resolution expressed disappointment at its inclusion. “The historical and biblical questions surrounding the notion that there was a formal Sanhedrin trial argue for extreme caution and, perhaps, even abandoning the device,” the resolution said.

A spokesman for the procession’s organizers said that “we’ve accommodated them [the Jews] where appropriate, but we’re unable to change the New Testament. Ultimately, we’re acknowledging that Christ was crucified for and by all sinners.”

The July 18 event is expected to attract 500,000 pilgrims.

http://www.jta.org/cgi-bin/iowa/breaking/108842.html

Christ told Pilate “he that hath delivered me to thee [the Sanhedrin], hath the greater sin” (John 18;11). Nothing any rabbi or prelate–much less any Hollywood script-writer, establishment journalist, or “Judeo-Christian” book publisher–could say or do can ever change this.

How Many Lies Can You Spot in this Lying Rabbi’s Lying Article published in a Lying Kosher-Catholic Journal?

May 10, 2008

Jewish Views of Other Faiths

By Rabbi Gilbert S. Rosenthal | MAY 19, 2008

America The National Catholic Weekly

P ope Benedict XVI’s recent revision of the “Prayer for the Conversion of the Jews” in the Latin text of the 1962 Good Friday liturgy set off a wave of questioning by puzzled Catholics and anxious concern among Jewish observers. Did the revival of language calling for the conversion of the Jewish people signify a departure from the ideals of the Second Vatican Council and its landmark document Nostra Aetate, which marked a radical change in the relationships between the Catholic Church and the Jewish people? Jews were wary of a return to preconciliar times, when the “teaching of contempt” marked the relationship between the two faiths. In restoring the 1962 liturgy, why did the pope not simply insert a Latin version of the lovely prayer adopted by Pope Paul VI and in use since 1970 in the vernacular services—a prayer that does not offend Jews and yet embodies the church’s hope for the union of the faiths at the end of days?

The concern expressed by Jewish leaders about a return to proselytizing Jews provoked two puzzling and unexpected reactions—one from Cardinal Francis George, archbishop of Chicago, the other from Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews. Cardinal George asked why Jews did not expunge passages in the Talmud that are insulting to Christians and refer to Jesus as a bastard. Cardinal Kasper reaffirmed “the freedom of Catholics to formulate our own prayers” and noted that “Jews have prayers in their liturgical texts that we don’t like.”

Are the charges true? Are there anti-Christian passages in the Talmud? Are there anti-Christian prayers in Jewish liturgy?

Censoring the Talmud

Over 5,800 pages long, the Talmud is a vast sea of learning that contains the opinions of thousands of rabbis, many of whom are not even named, on a variety of subjects, including law, lore, history, theology, ethics and many other topics. The Talmud does not represent authoritative law or theology or liturgy. There are perhaps four references to Jesus—all badly garbled, all written at least a century or two after his death. It is not at all clear if Jesus of Nazareth is even the intended subject of those citations.

In 1240, when Rabbi Yehiel of Paris had to defend the Talmud in a public disputation, he maintained that another man named Jesus, who lived a century before Jesus of Nazareth, was the subject of references in the Talmud. Jesus, after all, was the Greek name for Joshua, a common name at the time. In fact, Rabbi Yehiel argued, there was reference to another Jesus in the New Testament itself. But even if Jesus of Nazareth was the intended subject of some of these troubling passages, they reflect the opinion of one man, not the consensus of Jewish thought then or now.

Several polemical passages in the Talmud reflect the sharp controversies between rabbinic Judaism and the minim—a generic term that means “heretics or schismatic sects.” Whether the minim referred to in these passages are Judeo-Christians (Nazarenes, notzrim) or some other sect, like the gnostics, is not always clear from the text. Certain of these polemical passages were probably aimed at the new Jewish sect that split away from the synagogue and engaged in sharp theological and religious debates in the first centuries of the Common Era. Interestingly, the Talmud (Shabbat 116a-b) quotes only one passage from the New Testament, Mt 5:17—“I come not to abolish the Law but to fulfill it.”

In any case, the heavy hands of the censors removed the offensive passages. Sparked by the vindictiveness of apostate Jews who, for whatever personal or psychological reasons, maligned their former faith, cartloads of copies of the Talmud (and other Hebrew books) were torched in Paris in 1242. This happened again in Italy in the years 1553 to 1559. Censorship of all Hebrew books was introduced and enforced by agents of the Inquisition, often ex-Jews who turned with mindless fury on their former faith. Frequently the censors deleted inoffensive material; sometimes they substituted absurd and ridiculous texts for the original.

In 1554 in Italy, as a result of the relentless attacks on Jewish writings and in order to preserve the ability to publish Hebrew texts, Jewish communities installed a system of self-censorship so that no book would be published in the community without the approval of three qualified rabbis. As a result, no European edition of the Talmud contains anti-Christian texts or anti-Jesus statements. Texts published in oriental lands, however, were not subject to censorship, and they continue to contain the few offensive passages. Current editions of the Talmud text published in Israel indicate in the footnotes the original texts and explain the reasons for their elimination.

Problematic Liturgical Passages

Turning to the Jewish liturgy, we find it is virtually free of any references to other faiths except paganism and idolatry. There is not a single reference to Christianity or Islam in all the prayers. Yes, there are prayers that some day pagans will cease worshiping idols and come to acknowledge the God of Israel, the Father and Creator of all human beings, but surely no Christian or Muslim would object to these expressions of hope for the future?

Cardinal Kasper may have been thinking of two problematic passages in the liturgy of past centuries. The 12th blessing in the daily Amidah prayer, the so-called blessing of the slanderers, reads currently: “May there be no hope for those who slander and malign us and may all evil be crushed and all evildoers disappear.” This is a very ancient prayer; it was revised and rewritten any number of times in antiquity. It may have initially been formulated in the days of the Maccabees as a curse against the Hellenizing Jews who betrayed their people and the God of Israel. Later on, it was applied to the traitors who went over to the Romans and spied on the Jewish people. It was revised yet again as a prayer against the various sects and cults that contended with rabbinic Judaism: the Samaritans, the Sadducees, the gnostics—and for a time, the notzrim, the Judeo-Christians. In time, however, those ancient Palestinian texts were discarded. The version I have cited is the one universally used in the synagogue liturgy today—as it has been for centuries.

The second problematic text is the well-known Aleinu prayer, recited at the close of every synagogue service since the 14th century. The prayer has been attributed to the distinguished Babylonian sage Rav and his school of liturgists, who worked in the early third century, although recent scholarship has demonstrated that the prayer predates Rav and may well go back to the time of the Jerusalem Temple. The text clearly expresses the hope that some day the pagans who worship idols will accept the God of Israel and, in the spirit of the Prophet Zechariah, will unite in serving the one God. The line that has generated controversy reads, “For they bow to vanity and emptiness and pray to a god who cannot save, whereas we bow and prostrate ourselves before the King of Kings.”

As there were few Christians in Babylonia with whom Rav (if indeed he was the author) came in contact, the prayer is obviously directed against pagans, not Christians. Moreover, the passage is a fusion of two verses from Isaiah, 30:7 and 45:20, words uttered centuries before the appearance of Christianity. Once again, apostate Jews ignited the controversy. They claimed that the numerical value of the Hebrew letters in the offending passage equals the name of Jesus. Other apostates went even further: they insisted that the numerical value of the phrase equals Jesus and Muhammad. Rabbi Lippmann Muelhausen in Germany successfully refuted this slander in 1399, but the matter refused to die. Finally, Frederick the Great of Prussia ordered the passage stripped from the liturgy in 1703, installing guards in the synagogues to confirm that the phrase was deleted. And so it has remained in European liturgy until today. The Italian rite changed the verb to the past tense, “For they used to bow to idols and pray to a god who cannot save,” etc. Jews from the Middle East and orient retained the original text. Current Israeli prayer books often restore the text, sometimes placing it within parentheses. But I doubt if many or even any interpret the text as directed against Christians or Muslims. Needless to say, Reform, Conservative and Reconstructionist Jewish prayer books have eliminated the passages in question.

Moving Forward

What conclusions may we draw from this information? Centuries ago, a few bizarre statements about Jesus and Christianity could be found among the tens of thousands of rabbinic statements. These passages, however, have been deleted for many centuries. A denunciation of the new Judeo-Christian sect possibly was inserted in the Palestinian liturgy perhaps 19 centuries ago, a reflection of the sharp and often bitter theological polemics that raged at the time. That passage, too, has been long banished. A line in the Aleinu prayer that was surely intended as criticism of paganism and may have been misconstrued by some was deleted.

But all of these controversial passages together are dwarfed by the oceans of anti-Jewish preaching and teachings that attacked Judaism from the first century on. John Chrysostom alone (fourth century) delivered eight vitriolic anti-Jewish sermons—and this comprised but a fraction of the literature.

No anti-Christian material was ever inserted in our most sacred liturgy on Rosh Hashana or Yom Kippur, but the Good Friday service—one of the most sacred for Christians—codified anti-Jewish sentiment and, until 1962, slandered the “perfidious Jews,” who are blind to God’s truths and whose hearts are veiled to Jesus’ saving light.

It was not just the combination of external and internal censorship, however, that nudged Judaism to its stance. Jews concluded with the Prophet Malachi (3:10), that we all, indeed, have one Father, one God who has created us all. And the sages reasoned, perhaps as early as the second century, that “the righteous of all nations have a portion in the age to come” (Tosefta Sanhedrin 13:2). There should be no place in our liturgy or teachings or preaching for the demeaning of any other faith. This explains why Jews—and many Catholics—are so puzzled and disappointed by Pope Benedict’s changes to the 1962 liturgy. Does this return to a language of conversion reflect an erosion of the advances of Vatican II and its landmark documents, which have been part of the magisterium of the Catholic Church? Are we to forfeit the remarkable legacy of the late, lamented Pope John Paul II? We all pray that we will not retreat, but rather move forward in our relationship, the relationship of elder and younger brother, to borrow Pope John Paul II’s matchless language, so that we both may be a blessing to each other and “a blessing to the world.”


Rabbi Gilbert S. Rosenthal is the executive director of the National Council of Synagogues and the author and editor of 11 books, including Contemporary Judaism and The Many Faces of Judaism.


http://www.americamagazine.org/content/article.cfm?article_id=10824

How Many Lies Can You Spot in this Lying Rabbi’s Lying Article published in a Lying Kosher-Catholic Journal?

May 10, 2008

Jewish Views of Other Faiths

By Rabbi Gilbert S. Rosenthal | MAY 19, 2008

America The National Catholic Weekly

P ope Benedict XVI’s recent revision of the “Prayer for the Conversion of the Jews” in the Latin text of the 1962 Good Friday liturgy set off a wave of questioning by puzzled Catholics and anxious concern among Jewish observers. Did the revival of language calling for the conversion of the Jewish people signify a departure from the ideals of the Second Vatican Council and its landmark document Nostra Aetate, which marked a radical change in the relationships between the Catholic Church and the Jewish people? Jews were wary of a return to preconciliar times, when the “teaching of contempt” marked the relationship between the two faiths. In restoring the 1962 liturgy, why did the pope not simply insert a Latin version of the lovely prayer adopted by Pope Paul VI and in use since 1970 in the vernacular services—a prayer that does not offend Jews and yet embodies the church’s hope for the union of the faiths at the end of days?

The concern expressed by Jewish leaders about a return to proselytizing Jews provoked two puzzling and unexpected reactions—one from Cardinal Francis George, archbishop of Chicago, the other from Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews. Cardinal George asked why Jews did not expunge passages in the Talmud that are insulting to Christians and refer to Jesus as a bastard. Cardinal Kasper reaffirmed “the freedom of Catholics to formulate our own prayers” and noted that “Jews have prayers in their liturgical texts that we don’t like.”

Are the charges true? Are there anti-Christian passages in the Talmud? Are there anti-Christian prayers in Jewish liturgy?

Censoring the Talmud

Over 5,800 pages long, the Talmud is a vast sea of learning that contains the opinions of thousands of rabbis, many of whom are not even named, on a variety of subjects, including law, lore, history, theology, ethics and many other topics. The Talmud does not represent authoritative law or theology or liturgy. There are perhaps four references to Jesus—all badly garbled, all written at least a century or two after his death. It is not at all clear if Jesus of Nazareth is even the intended subject of those citations.

In 1240, when Rabbi Yehiel of Paris had to defend the Talmud in a public disputation, he maintained that another man named Jesus, who lived a century before Jesus of Nazareth, was the subject of references in the Talmud. Jesus, after all, was the Greek name for Joshua, a common name at the time. In fact, Rabbi Yehiel argued, there was reference to another Jesus in the New Testament itself. But even if Jesus of Nazareth was the intended subject of some of these troubling passages, they reflect the opinion of one man, not the consensus of Jewish thought then or now.

Several polemical passages in the Talmud reflect the sharp controversies between rabbinic Judaism and the minim—a generic term that means “heretics or schismatic sects.” Whether the minim referred to in these passages are Judeo-Christians (Nazarenes, notzrim) or some other sect, like the gnostics, is not always clear from the text. Certain of these polemical passages were probably aimed at the new Jewish sect that split away from the synagogue and engaged in sharp theological and religious debates in the first centuries of the Common Era. Interestingly, the Talmud (Shabbat 116a-b) quotes only one passage from the New Testament, Mt 5:17—“I come not to abolish the Law but to fulfill it.”

In any case, the heavy hands of the censors removed the offensive passages. Sparked by the vindictiveness of apostate Jews who, for whatever personal or psychological reasons, maligned their former faith, cartloads of copies of the Talmud (and other Hebrew books) were torched in Paris in 1242. This happened again in Italy in the years 1553 to 1559. Censorship of all Hebrew books was introduced and enforced by agents of the Inquisition, often ex-Jews who turned with mindless fury on their former faith. Frequently the censors deleted inoffensive material; sometimes they substituted absurd and ridiculous texts for the original.

In 1554 in Italy, as a result of the relentless attacks on Jewish writings and in order to preserve the ability to publish Hebrew texts, Jewish communities installed a system of self-censorship so that no book would be published in the community without the approval of three qualified rabbis. As a result, no European edition of the Talmud contains anti-Christian texts or anti-Jesus statements. Texts published in oriental lands, however, were not subject to censorship, and they continue to contain the few offensive passages. Current editions of the Talmud text published in Israel indicate in the footnotes the original texts and explain the reasons for their elimination.

Problematic Liturgical Passages

Turning to the Jewish liturgy, we find it is virtually free of any references to other faiths except paganism and idolatry. There is not a single reference to Christianity or Islam in all the prayers. Yes, there are prayers that some day pagans will cease worshiping idols and come to acknowledge the God of Israel, the Father and Creator of all human beings, but surely no Christian or Muslim would object to these expressions of hope for the future?

Cardinal Kasper may have been thinking of two problematic passages in the liturgy of past centuries. The 12th blessing in the daily Amidah prayer, the so-called blessing of the slanderers, reads currently: “May there be no hope for those who slander and malign us and may all evil be crushed and all evildoers disappear.” This is a very ancient prayer; it was revised and rewritten any number of times in antiquity. It may have initially been formulated in the days of the Maccabees as a curse against the Hellenizing Jews who betrayed their people and the God of Israel. Later on, it was applied to the traitors who went over to the Romans and spied on the Jewish people. It was revised yet again as a prayer against the various sects and cults that contended with rabbinic Judaism: the Samaritans, the Sadducees, the gnostics—and for a time, the notzrim, the Judeo-Christians. In time, however, those ancient Palestinian texts were discarded. The version I have cited is the one universally used in the synagogue liturgy today—as it has been for centuries.

The second problematic text is the well-known Aleinu prayer, recited at the close of every synagogue service since the 14th century. The prayer has been attributed to the distinguished Babylonian sage Rav and his school of liturgists, who worked in the early third century, although recent scholarship has demonstrated that the prayer predates Rav and may well go back to the time of the Jerusalem Temple. The text clearly expresses the hope that some day the pagans who worship idols will accept the God of Israel and, in the spirit of the Prophet Zechariah, will unite in serving the one God. The line that has generated controversy reads, “For they bow to vanity and emptiness and pray to a god who cannot save, whereas we bow and prostrate ourselves before the King of Kings.”

As there were few Christians in Babylonia with whom Rav (if indeed he was the author) came in contact, the prayer is obviously directed against pagans, not Christians. Moreover, the passage is a fusion of two verses from Isaiah, 30:7 and 45:20, words uttered centuries before the appearance of Christianity. Once again, apostate Jews ignited the controversy. They claimed that the numerical value of the Hebrew letters in the offending passage equals the name of Jesus. Other apostates went even further: they insisted that the numerical value of the phrase equals Jesus and Muhammad. Rabbi Lippmann Muelhausen in Germany successfully refuted this slander in 1399, but the matter refused to die. Finally, Frederick the Great of Prussia ordered the passage stripped from the liturgy in 1703, installing guards in the synagogues to confirm that the phrase was deleted. And so it has remained in European liturgy until today. The Italian rite changed the verb to the past tense, “For they used to bow to idols and pray to a god who cannot save,” etc. Jews from the Middle East and orient retained the original text. Current Israeli prayer books often restore the text, sometimes placing it within parentheses. But I doubt if many or even any interpret the text as directed against Christians or Muslims. Needless to say, Reform, Conservative and Reconstructionist Jewish prayer books have eliminated the passages in question.

Moving Forward

What conclusions may we draw from this information? Centuries ago, a few bizarre statements about Jesus and Christianity could be found among the tens of thousands of rabbinic statements. These passages, however, have been deleted for many centuries. A denunciation of the new Judeo-Christian sect possibly was inserted in the Palestinian liturgy perhaps 19 centuries ago, a reflection of the sharp and often bitter theological polemics that raged at the time. That passage, too, has been long banished. A line in the Aleinu prayer that was surely intended as criticism of paganism and may have been misconstrued by some was deleted.

But all of these controversial passages together are dwarfed by the oceans of anti-Jewish preaching and teachings that attacked Judaism from the first century on. John Chrysostom alone (fourth century) delivered eight vitriolic anti-Jewish sermons—and this comprised but a fraction of the literature.

No anti-Christian material was ever inserted in our most sacred liturgy on Rosh Hashana or Yom Kippur, but the Good Friday service—one of the most sacred for Christians—codified anti-Jewish sentiment and, until 1962, slandered the “perfidious Jews,” who are blind to God’s truths and whose hearts are veiled to Jesus’ saving light.

It was not just the combination of external and internal censorship, however, that nudged Judaism to its stance. Jews concluded with the Prophet Malachi (3:10), that we all, indeed, have one Father, one God who has created us all. And the sages reasoned, perhaps as early as the second century, that “the righteous of all nations have a portion in the age to come” (Tosefta Sanhedrin 13:2). There should be no place in our liturgy or teachings or preaching for the demeaning of any other faith. This explains why Jews—and many Catholics—are so puzzled and disappointed by Pope Benedict’s changes to the 1962 liturgy. Does this return to a language of conversion reflect an erosion of the advances of Vatican II and its landmark documents, which have been part of the magisterium of the Catholic Church? Are we to forfeit the remarkable legacy of the late, lamented Pope John Paul II? We all pray that we will not retreat, but rather move forward in our relationship, the relationship of elder and younger brother, to borrow Pope John Paul II’s matchless language, so that we both may be a blessing to each other and “a blessing to the world.”


Rabbi Gilbert S. Rosenthal is the executive director of the National Council of Synagogues and the author and editor of 11 books, including Contemporary Judaism and The Many Faces of Judaism.


http://www.americamagazine.org/content/article.cfm?article_id=10824

Observations on Benedict XVI’s Passover Eve Synagogue Visit

April 19, 2008

Witness video of Benedict’s Passover eve synagogue visit in its entirety at this link:

http://wcbstv.com/topstories/Pope.Benedict.NYC.2.703533.html

What can we observe here that has not already been pointed out?

There is a tremendous amount of effort being devoted towards propping up the idea that these people who today call themselves “Jews” are actual descendants of the ancient Israelites. Maintaining this illusion is critical to the entire charade.

Likewise there’s a great deal of effort made to associate Jesus with the people who today call themselves “Jews” and the anti-Biblical religion of Orthodox Judaism. Benedict stated, “I find it moving to recall that Jesus, as a young boy, heard the words of Scripture and prayed in a place such as this [NY synagogue].” This statement is false and ridiculous, but it does create an association between Jesus and the Talmudic synagogues of today, which is its most likely intended purpose.

The “brothers” theme was reinforced by the rabbi. This is a clear allusion to Jacob and Esau who were at conflict in the Old Testament. There is a Kabbalistic gnosis having to do with “Jacob” being reconciled with “Esau” prior to the Judaic “redemption.” This gnosis stems from the occult tradition related to the conjunction of opposites. The Vatican’s relentless drive towards “reconciliation” between Christians and Orthodox Judaic followers of the Talmud and Kabbalah is harmonious with this Kabbalistic tradition and has nothing to do with Christian, Biblical tradition. St. Paul spoke of reconciliation between Jews and Gentiles, but that it could only be through faith in Jesus Christ. This is beside the fact that we can’t know who the true descendants of Abraham, Issac and Jacob are. To apply St. Paul’s words regarding reconciliation to these Khazars and Sephardim who deny Christ and adhere to Talmud and Kabbalah is as diabolical as it is foolish.

The gifts that are exchanged at these meetings between the popes and Judaic leaders invariably are Judaic gifts. There is a lot to be read into this in terms of direction and proportion in their “dialogue.” The synagogue gave Benedict a silver Seder plate, a Passover haggadah and matzo, and he gave them a medieval Judaic codex.

The Judaic codex which Benedict gave the synagogue as a gift was a text from the medieval rabbinic codifier, Jacob ben Asher the Ba’al ha-Turim (Master of the Pillars). Jacob ben Asher is best known for his Rimzei Ba’al ha-Turim, a work of gematria, which is to say, methods for finding “hidden teachings” in Biblical texts which, consequently, nullify the written meaning.

These poor, deluded people could benefit so much more from a copy of the New Testament than the satanic gematria of Jacob ben Asher, but why would Benedict bring the Gospel to a synagogue on the anniversary of Christ’s execution? Apparently, Benedict visited these people in their synagogue on this day only to celebrate with them in their delusional ethnic conceit, praise them for their anti-Biblical traditions, and to validate those same ethnic delusions and anti-Biblical traditions in the eyes of Christians. The only preaching I heard had to do with the anti-Biblical doctrine, “Tikkun Olam” and it came from the rabbi.

Speaking of gematria, The NY Times has gone to great lengths to document that the visit was 22 minutes long. Those who understand the Kabbalistic obsession with numbers will recognize the significance here:

Pope Benedict XVI paid a 22-minute visit to the Park East Synagogue — the first papal trip to a United States synagogue — on Friday afternoon …

The pope entered the synagogue at 5:16 p.m. …

The pope exited the synagogue at 5:38 p.m., ending a visit of just over 20 minutes. (Pope Makes First Visit to a U.S. Synagogue,” Sewell Chan, The New York Times, April 19, 2008) http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/04/18/a-key-moment-in-benedicts-relationship-with-the-jews/?hp

Benedict could well have become the most treacherous “vicar of Christ” in history after these past two days. Meanwhile, “traditionalists” are focused on complaining about the music at his baseball stadium Mass …

See also:

http://revisionistreview.blogspot.com/2008/04/at-synagogue-pope-tells-two-lies-in-two.html

Observations on Benedict XVI’s Passover Eve Synagogue Visit

April 19, 2008

Witness video of Benedict’s Passover eve synagogue visit in its entirety at this link:

http://wcbstv.com/topstories/Pope.Benedict.NYC.2.703533.html

What can we observe here that has not already been pointed out?

There is a tremendous amount of effort being devoted towards propping up the idea that these people who today call themselves “Jews” are actual descendants of the ancient Israelites. Maintaining this illusion is critical to the entire charade.

Likewise there’s a great deal of effort made to associate Jesus with the people who today call themselves “Jews” and the anti-Biblical religion of Orthodox Judaism. Benedict stated, “I find it moving to recall that Jesus, as a young boy, heard the words of Scripture and prayed in a place such as this [NY synagogue].” This statement is false and ridiculous, but it does create an association between Jesus and the Talmudic synagogues of today, which is its most likely intended purpose.

The “brothers” theme was reinforced by the rabbi. This is a clear allusion to Jacob and Esau who were at conflict in the Old Testament. There is a Kabbalistic gnosis having to do with “Jacob” being reconciled with “Esau” prior to the Judaic “redemption.” This gnosis stems from the occult tradition related to the conjunction of opposites. The Vatican’s relentless drive towards “reconciliation” between Christians and Orthodox Judaic followers of the Talmud and Kabbalah is harmonious with this Kabbalistic tradition and has nothing to do with Christian, Biblical tradition. St. Paul spoke of reconciliation between Jews and Gentiles, but that it could only be through faith in Jesus Christ. This is beside the fact that we can’t know who the true descendants of Abraham, Issac and Jacob are. To apply St. Paul’s words regarding reconciliation to these Khazars and Sephardim who deny Christ and adhere to Talmud and Kabbalah is as diabolical as it is foolish.

The gifts that are exchanged at these meetings between the popes and Judaic leaders invariably are Judaic gifts. There is a lot to be read into this in terms of direction and proportion in their “dialogue.” The synagogue gave Benedict a silver Seder plate, a Passover haggadah and matzo, and he gave them a medieval Judaic codex.

The Judaic codex which Benedict gave the synagogue as a gift was a text from the medieval rabbinic codifier, Jacob ben Asher the Ba’al ha-Turim (Master of the Pillars). Jacob ben Asher is best known for his Rimzei Ba’al ha-Turim, a work of gematria, which is to say, methods for finding “hidden teachings” in Biblical texts which, consequently, nullify the written meaning.

These poor, deluded people could benefit so much more from a copy of the New Testament than the satanic gematria of Jacob ben Asher, but why would Benedict bring the Gospel to a synagogue on the anniversary of Christ’s execution? Apparently, Benedict visited these people in their synagogue on this day only to celebrate with them in their delusional ethnic conceit, praise them for their anti-Biblical traditions, and to validate those same ethnic delusions and anti-Biblical traditions in the eyes of Christians. The only preaching I heard had to do with the anti-Biblical doctrine, “Tikkun Olam” and it came from the rabbi.

Speaking of gematria, The NY Times has gone to great lengths to document that the visit was 22 minutes long. Those who understand the Kabbalistic obsession with numbers will recognize the significance here:

Pope Benedict XVI paid a 22-minute visit to the Park East Synagogue — the first papal trip to a United States synagogue — on Friday afternoon …

The pope entered the synagogue at 5:16 p.m. …

The pope exited the synagogue at 5:38 p.m., ending a visit of just over 20 minutes. (Pope Makes First Visit to a U.S. Synagogue,” Sewell Chan, The New York Times, April 19, 2008) http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/04/18/a-key-moment-in-benedicts-relationship-with-the-jews/?hp

Benedict could well have become the most treacherous “vicar of Christ” in history after these past two days. Meanwhile, “traditionalists” are focused on complaining about the music at his baseball stadium Mass …

See also:

http://revisionistreview.blogspot.com/2008/04/at-synagogue-pope-tells-two-lies-in-two.html

NY Times Piece on the Passover Eve Papal Synagogue Visit

April 15, 2008

The New York Times notes:

Something seems to guide popes to New York at moments of spiritual significance for Jews. John Paul landed here in October 1995 on Yom Kippur. Benedict now comes at Passover …

History Awaits the Pope and the Rabbi

By CLYDE HABERMAN – The New York Times

April 15, 2008

This is a busy time for Rabbi Arthur Schneier, and his schedule will only become more complicated as the week winds down. Preparations must be made for Passover, which begins Saturday night. Like any rabbi who leads a congregation, he has to write a sermon for the Sabbath. Then he needs to come up with themes for Passover services on Sunday and Monday.

Oh, one other thing: He also has to welcome a pope.

The New York journey of Pope Benedict XVI will include a historic stop of 20 minutes or so late Friday afternoon at the Park East Synagogue on East 67th Street, where Rabbi Schneier has been the spiritual leader since 1962. “Historic” is an often abused word. But in this instance it isn’t misplaced.

Never before has a pope visited a synagogue in this country. Indeed, till now, there have been only two recorded papal visits to synagogues anywhere: by John Paul II in Rome in 1986 and by Benedict in Cologne, Germany, in 2005, four months after he ascended to the papacy.

So Benedict’s conversation with Jewish religious and lay figures at Park East — think of it, with absolute respect, as the Schmooze of the Fisherman — is a certified big deal, brief though it will be.

“I look at it as a message of good will by Pope Benedict, saluting the largest Jewish community in the world outside of Israel — New York — but in a greater context, American Jewry and world Jewry,” Rabbi Schneier said. “Basically, the message is: ‘I am continuing the outreach to the Jews.’ ”

Something seems to guide popes to New York at moments of spiritual significance for Jews.

John Paul landed here in October 1995 on Yom Kippur. Benedict now comes at Passover …

Full article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/15/nyregion/15nyc.html?ref=nyregion

NY Times Piece on the Passover Eve Papal Synagogue Visit

April 15, 2008

The New York Times notes:

Something seems to guide popes to New York at moments of spiritual significance for Jews. John Paul landed here in October 1995 on Yom Kippur. Benedict now comes at Passover …

History Awaits the Pope and the Rabbi

By CLYDE HABERMAN – The New York Times

April 15, 2008

This is a busy time for Rabbi Arthur Schneier, and his schedule will only become more complicated as the week winds down. Preparations must be made for Passover, which begins Saturday night. Like any rabbi who leads a congregation, he has to write a sermon for the Sabbath. Then he needs to come up with themes for Passover services on Sunday and Monday.

Oh, one other thing: He also has to welcome a pope.

The New York journey of Pope Benedict XVI will include a historic stop of 20 minutes or so late Friday afternoon at the Park East Synagogue on East 67th Street, where Rabbi Schneier has been the spiritual leader since 1962. “Historic” is an often abused word. But in this instance it isn’t misplaced.

Never before has a pope visited a synagogue in this country. Indeed, till now, there have been only two recorded papal visits to synagogues anywhere: by John Paul II in Rome in 1986 and by Benedict in Cologne, Germany, in 2005, four months after he ascended to the papacy.

So Benedict’s conversation with Jewish religious and lay figures at Park East — think of it, with absolute respect, as the Schmooze of the Fisherman — is a certified big deal, brief though it will be.

“I look at it as a message of good will by Pope Benedict, saluting the largest Jewish community in the world outside of Israel — New York — but in a greater context, American Jewry and world Jewry,” Rabbi Schneier said. “Basically, the message is: ‘I am continuing the outreach to the Jews.’ ”

Something seems to guide popes to New York at moments of spiritual significance for Jews.

John Paul landed here in October 1995 on Yom Kippur. Benedict now comes at Passover …

Full article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/15/nyregion/15nyc.html?ref=nyregion

Benedict Wants the World to be Conscious of the Symbolic Significance of his Passover Eve Synagogue Visit

April 14, 2008

Benedict publicly acknowledged the fact that Christ was crucified on Passover eve in his homily of Holy Thursday, March 20, 2008 which coincided with Purim Eve:

The Pope made [the following] observation Holy Thursday in his homily during the Mass of the Lord’s Supper at the Basilica of St. John Lateran … “According to John, Jesus died on the cross precisely at the moment in which, in the temple, the Passover lambs were being sacrificed. His death and the sacrifice of the lambs coincided.

“This means that he died on the eve of Passover … “

(“Pope Notes Hypothesis on Date of Passover,” Zenit, April 6, 2008)

http://www.zenit.org/article-19341?l=english

Let there be no doubt that Benedict is entirely conscious of the symbolic significance of his visit to a NY synagogue on Passover eve this Friday, April 18, 2008. Having publicly drawn attention to the fact that Christ was crucified on Passover eve only a month ago, it’s as if Benedict wants the world to also be conscious of it.

Not surprisingly, we see denial-based speculation among traditionalists that the Passover eve synagogue visit may have only been a rumor or was canceled due to its absence from the official itinerary for the papal visit. These people have missed the fact that the visit is a “personal and informal visit, which is not part of [the Pope’s] official program” according to Monsignor David Malloy, general secretary of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. It was never on the official itinerary. Neither is his private meeting with the rabbis and Judaic power-brokers on the day before the synagogue visit, Thursday April 17th, which is the actual anniversary of the night Jesus was betrayed by Judas to the Pharisees.

On the following day Benedict will visit a synagogue of Orthodox Judaism, the religion which holds that Jesus was a sorcerer rightly executed on Passover eve for criticizing the Pharisees and leading Israel astray–on the anniversary of the day which their Talmud claims that this claimed righteous execution took place, and the day on which the Gospel records that the most terrible crime in history–the crucifixion of God-incarnate–took place.

And despite this and countless other such acts of treachery, there are still hysterical demands for further “teshuva” and “tikkun” from the modern-day spiritual heirs of the Pharisees whom Benedict calls our “elder brothers.” Witness the fruits of “reconciliation” with “The Jews.”

read:

Benedict to Visit NY Synagogue on Passover Eve, the Day on which the Talmud Claims Jesus was Executed by the Pharisees

For the sake of His Passion

Rabbi Comments on the “Very Symbolic” Timing of Benedict’s Synagogue Visit

Benedict Wants the World to be Conscious of the Symbolic Significance of his Passover Eve Synagogue Visit

April 14, 2008

Benedict publicly acknowledged the fact that Christ was crucified on Passover eve in his homily of Holy Thursday, March 20, 2008 which coincided with Purim Eve:

The Pope made [the following] observation Holy Thursday in his homily during the Mass of the Lord’s Supper at the Basilica of St. John Lateran … “According to John, Jesus died on the cross precisely at the moment in which, in the temple, the Passover lambs were being sacrificed. His death and the sacrifice of the lambs coincided.

“This means that he died on the eve of Passover … “

(“Pope Notes Hypothesis on Date of Passover,” Zenit, April 6, 2008)

http://www.zenit.org/article-19341?l=english

Let there be no doubt that Benedict is entirely conscious of the symbolic significance of his visit to a NY synagogue on Passover eve this Friday, April 18, 2008. Having publicly drawn attention to the fact that Christ was crucified on Passover eve only a month ago, it’s as if Benedict wants the world to also be conscious of it.

Not surprisingly, we see denial-based speculation among traditionalists that the Passover eve synagogue visit may have only been a rumor or was canceled due to its absence from the official itinerary for the papal visit. These people have missed the fact that the visit is a “personal and informal visit, which is not part of [the Pope’s] official program” according to Monsignor David Malloy, general secretary of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. It was never on the official itinerary. Neither is his private meeting with the rabbis and Judaic power-brokers on the day before the synagogue visit, Thursday April 17th, which is the actual anniversary of the night Jesus was betrayed by Judas to the Pharisees.

On the following day Benedict will visit a synagogue of Orthodox Judaism, the religion which holds that Jesus was a sorcerer rightly executed on Passover eve for criticizing the Pharisees and leading Israel astray–on the anniversary of the day which their Talmud claims that this claimed righteous execution took place, and the day on which the Gospel records that the most terrible crime in history–the crucifixion of God-incarnate–took place.

And despite this and countless other such acts of treachery, there are still hysterical demands for further “teshuva” and “tikkun” from the modern-day spiritual heirs of the Pharisees whom Benedict calls our “elder brothers.” Witness the fruits of “reconciliation” with “The Jews.”

read:

Benedict to Visit NY Synagogue on Passover Eve, the Day on which the Talmud Claims Jesus was Executed by the Pharisees

For the sake of His Passion

Rabbi Comments on the “Very Symbolic” Timing of Benedict’s Synagogue Visit

Observations on Benedict XVI’s Passover Eve Synagogue Visit