Archive for the ‘Reflections On Covenant And Mission’ Category

Tikkun Olam is a Tribal, not Universal, Concept

September 3, 2010

[Abraham] Foxman acknowledged that he’d taken a swipe at the concept [tikkun olam, repairing the world] at last year’s Jewish People’s Policy Planning Conference but said that his problem was not with tikkun olam as a value but with its current ubiquity in religious discourse. “What I’ve been critical of is those who have sold Judaism as, ‘All you have to do is love universally and that’s Judaism,’ ”Foxman said. “It’s not—it’s ersatz Judaism. It’s Judaism lite.” It also, Foxman added pointedly, has the potential to elevate political action on behalf of others while brushing past the theological significance of acting on behalf of Jews. (Marissa Brostoff, “Beyond Repair,” Sep 3, 2010, The Tablet)

http://www.tabletmag.com/life-and-religion/44356/beyond-repair/

Also see:

Judaic Activists Set Sail for the Cause of Tribal Universalism?

Joint “Judeo-Christian” efforts at “repairing the world” (such as THIS) ultimately serve rabbinic interests.

The Judeo-Christian racket is intended only to convert Christians into “Noahide” servants. See:

USCCB States Principles for “Dialogue” Fraud

USCCB States Principles for "Dialogue" Fraud

October 7, 2009

http://www.usccb.org/seia/StatementofPrinciples.pdf

http://www.usccb.org/seia/ResponsetoRabbis.pdf

The USCCB has retracted this statement from an earlier document, “A NOTE ON AMBIGUITIES CONTAINED IN REFLECTIONS ON COVENANT AND MISSION”:

“Though Christian participation in interreligious dialogue would not normally include an explicit invitation to baptism and entrance into the Church, the Christian dialogue partner is always giving witness to the following of Christ, to which all are implicitly invited.”

http://www.usccb.org/doctrine/covenant09.pdf

Read the original “Reflections on Covenant and Mission” document which is a transparent call for conversion of Christians to the Talmudic “Noahide Laws” and Kabbalistic “Tikkun Olam.”

http://www.usccb.org/doctrine/covenant09.pdf

The USCCB says, “Catholic-Jewish dialogue has never been and never will be used by the Catholic Church as a means of proselytism or a disguised invitation to baptism.” But the rabbis say that “dialogue” is indeed an occasion to convert Christians into “Noahides” as Rabbi Yehoshua Friedman of the “Root and Branch” organization explains:

“Our approach is a VERY STRICT AND LIMITED application of the principle of interfaith cooperation which Rabbi Soloveitchik permits …

We DO NOT discuss with Christians (or other non-Jews) differences or similarities between our religious beliefs (theological “Show and Tell”) and those of other religions (i.e. “interfaith dialogue”).

We DO give rabbis and scholars from the Torah observant community the opportunity to discuss with and teach non-Jews about universal Jewish ethical principles (the Seven Laws of Noah [“Noahide Laws”]) …”

http://www.rb.org.il/RBIS/RBIS%201998/RBIS%201998.10.07.htm

“Dialogue” is a one-way path to disaster.

Also see:

Rabbi Elijah Soloveichik’s Trojan Horse for Christianity

More Pilpul From the USCCB

June 19, 2009

All the hairsplitting pilpul in the world can’t turn non-believing Ashkenzim, Sephardim, et al, into biblical, chosen people. The 2002 Reflections on Covenant and Mission document is groundless; a fraud based upon a fraud. This “clarification” is only another step in the dialectical process towards Benedict’s “reconciliation between Christians and ‘Jews'” where ‘Jews’ continue in their unbelief, deluded racial conceit and adherance to anti-biblical rabbinism, while Christians, by guilt and cajolery, are converted away from the Gospel and into the ‘Noahide’ fraud.

These so-called ‘Jews’ don’t believe Jesus Christ, nor do they even believe Moses (John 5;41-47). Their unsubstantiated claim to genetic descent from the patriarchs affords them no special relationship with the Church. The bishops’ suggestion to the contrary is anti-biblical, rabbinic nonsense.

USCCB Clarifies Key Points From Reflections On Covenant And Mission Statement (2002)

June 19, 2009

WASHINGTON DC (MetroCatholic) – A statement clarifying two points of Catholic teaching relative to the Jewish community was released June 18, at the spring meeting of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). A Note on Ambiguities Contained in Covenant and Mission was jointly issued by the Committee on Doctrine and Pastoral Practice and the Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs. The statement can be found at http://www.usccb.org/bishops/covenant09.pdf.

“Our most important concern here is a pastoral one,” said Archbishop Wilton Gregory, chairman of the Bishops’ Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs. “The 2002 document, Covenant and Mission, raised many questions among Catholics in the United States about how the Church relates to the Jewish community. Today’s statement helps to answer these questions clearly.”

Bishop William Lori, chairman of the Bishops’ Committee on Doctrine and Pastoral Practice, stated that there were two key points at issue.

“The USCCB reaffirms what the Holy See has stated repeatedly: that while the Catholic Church does not proselytize the Jewish people, neither does she fail to witness to them her faith in Christ, nor to welcome them to share in that same faith whenever appropriate.” Bishop Lori said. He added that current debates over the question of how Catholics understand the covenant with Moses in relation to Christ were equally important. The covenant with Moses, that continues to be adhered to by Jews today, is fulfilled, Christians believe, in Jesus.

“As followers of Jesus, we see his covenant as fulfilling God’s plan for the salvation of all peoples, both now and at the end of time,” Bishop Lori said.

Archbishop Gregory commended the on-going work of scholars and pastors in Catholic-Jewish dialogue. “Pope John Paul II once referred to Jews as ‘our elder brothers and sisters in faith’”, he said. “By continuing our study together, we hope to deepen our understanding of Jesus and our relationship with each other in God’s redemption of the world.”

http://www.dfwcatholic.org/usccb-clarifies-key-points-from-reflections-on-covenant-and-mission-statement-20025004/.html

More Pilpul From the USCCB

June 19, 2009

All the hairsplitting pilpul in the world can’t turn non-believing Ashkenzim, Sephardim, et al, into biblical, chosen people. The 2002 Reflections on Covenant and Mission document is groundless; a fraud based upon a fraud. This “clarification” is only another step in the dialectical process towards Benedict’s “reconciliation between Christians and ‘Jews'” where ‘Jews’ continue in their unbelief, deluded racial conceit and adherance to anti-biblical rabbinism, while Christians, by guilt and cajolery, are converted away from the Gospel and into the ‘Noahide’ fraud.

These so-called ‘Jews’ don’t believe Jesus Christ, nor do they even believe Moses (John 5;41-47). Their unsubstantiated claim to genetic descent from the patriarchs affords them no special relationship with the Church. The bishops’ suggestion to the contrary is anti-biblical, rabbinic nonsense.

USCCB Clarifies Key Points From Reflections On Covenant And Mission Statement (2002)

June 19, 2009

WASHINGTON DC (MetroCatholic) – A statement clarifying two points of Catholic teaching relative to the Jewish community was released June 18, at the spring meeting of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). A Note on Ambiguities Contained in Covenant and Mission was jointly issued by the Committee on Doctrine and Pastoral Practice and the Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs. The statement can be found at http://www.usccb.org/bishops/covenant09.pdf.

“Our most important concern here is a pastoral one,” said Archbishop Wilton Gregory, chairman of the Bishops’ Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs. “The 2002 document, Covenant and Mission, raised many questions among Catholics in the United States about how the Church relates to the Jewish community. Today’s statement helps to answer these questions clearly.”

Bishop William Lori, chairman of the Bishops’ Committee on Doctrine and Pastoral Practice, stated that there were two key points at issue.

“The USCCB reaffirms what the Holy See has stated repeatedly: that while the Catholic Church does not proselytize the Jewish people, neither does she fail to witness to them her faith in Christ, nor to welcome them to share in that same faith whenever appropriate.” Bishop Lori said. He added that current debates over the question of how Catholics understand the covenant with Moses in relation to Christ were equally important. The covenant with Moses, that continues to be adhered to by Jews today, is fulfilled, Christians believe, in Jesus.

“As followers of Jesus, we see his covenant as fulfilling God’s plan for the salvation of all peoples, both now and at the end of time,” Bishop Lori said.

Archbishop Gregory commended the on-going work of scholars and pastors in Catholic-Jewish dialogue. “Pope John Paul II once referred to Jews as ‘our elder brothers and sisters in faith’”, he said. “By continuing our study together, we hope to deepen our understanding of Jesus and our relationship with each other in God’s redemption of the world.”

http://www.dfwcatholic.org/usccb-clarifies-key-points-from-reflections-on-covenant-and-mission-statement-20025004/.html