Archive for the ‘Racial Supremacism’ Category

Founder of American Judaism, Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise: "Masonry founded by Jews as a cosmopolitical institution"

December 7, 2012

Also see:

A Lesson in Globalism

NOACHIDAE. The descendants of Noah, and the transmitters of his religious dogmas, which were the unity of God and the immortality of the soul. The name has from the earliest times been bestowed upon the Freemasons, who teach the same doctrines. Thus in the “old charges,” as quoted by Anderson (Const. edit. 1738, p. 143), it is said, “A mason is obliged by his tenure to observe the moral law as a true Noachidae.” (The Symbolism of Freemasonry: Illustrating and Explaining Its Science and Philosophy, its Legends, Myths and Symbols, Albert G. Mackey)

TALMUD. The mystical philosophy of the Jewish Rabbins is contained in the Talmud … In the Talmud much will be found of great interest to the masonic student. (The Symbolism of Freemasonry: Illustrating and Explaining Its Science and Philosophy, its Legends, Myths and Symbols, Albert G. Mackey)

CABALA. The mystical philosophy of the Jews. The word which is derived from a Hebrew root, signifying to receive, has sometimes been used in an enlarged sense, as comprehending all the explanations, maxims, and ceremonies which have been traditionally handed down to the Jews; but in that more limited acceptation, in which it is intimately connected with the symbolic science of Freemasonry, the cabala may be defined to be a system of philosophy which embraces certain mystical interpretations of Scripture, and metaphysical speculations concerning the Deity, man, and spiritual beings. In these interpretations and speculations, according to the Jewish doctors, were enveloped the most profound truths of religion, which, to be comprehended by finite beings, are obliged to be revealed through the medium of symbols and allegories … (The Symbolism of Freemasonry: Illustrating and Explaining Its Science and Philosophy, its Legends, Myths and Symbols, Albert G. Mackey)

Also see:

Papal Commission Promotes Noahide Laws

Pope Benedict’s ‘Noahide Law’ Commission Mocks Victims of Talmudic Economics


Hans Kung, Pied Noahide Piper


One World Religion Under the ‘Noahide’ Rainbow

The REAL Hidden Dangers of the Rainbow

"Goy’ Sperm Yields Barbaric Offspring"

January 12, 2011

Cardinal Martini sez:

Judaism, in its study centers, has elaborated the talmudic tradition in latter-day commentaries. The church cannot ignore the results of this elaboration, as they are present in religious, legal, and philosophical texts of postbiblical Jewish literature. There are many examples of such initiatives. But for them to bear fruit, we will have to extend them to the widest possible number of dioceses, communities, and ecclesial groups, in order to dispel the clouds of ignorance (for which we ourselves are largely responsible) that have separated us in the past and set us in mutual opposition.

I am certain that a profound understanding of Judaism will be vital for the church, not merely to overcome centuries of ignorance and initiate productive dialogue, but also to deepen the church’s self-understanding. (“The Road to Jerusalem,” Cardinal Carlo Maria Martini)

I offer below, teachings from post-biblical rabbinic literature, the Sefer HaChinuch [Book of Education]. I hope that readers will extend them to the widest possible number of dioceses, communities, and ecclesial groups, in order to dispel the clouds of ignorance and to inculcate profound understanding of Judaism vital for the Church not merely to overcome centuries of ignorance and initiate productive dialogue, but also to deepen the Church’s distinction from this racial-supremacist, racial-determinist counterfeit.

Rabbi Dov Lior, like Rabbi She’ar-Yashuv Cohen who Pope Benedict XVI invited to teach at a 2008 synod, is an apostle of the father of modern racial-supremacist militant Messianic Zionism, Rabbi Avraham Yitzhak Kook.

‘Gentile sperm leads to barbaric offspring’

Kobi Nahshoni – Ynet

January 11, 2011

Israel Jewish Scene

Rabbi Dov Lior, a senior authority on Jewish law in the Religious Zionism movement, asserted recently that a Jewish woman should never get pregnant using sperm donated by a non-Jewish man – even if it is the last option available.

According to Lior, a baby born through such an insemination will have the “negative genetic traits that characterize non-Jews.”

“Sefer HaChinuch (a book of [rabbinic] law) states that the character traits of the father pass on to the son,” he said in the lecture. “If the father in not Jewish, what character traits could he have? Traits of cruelty, of barbarism! These are not traits that characterize the people of Israel” …

Lior added identified Jews as merciful, shy and charitable – qualities that he claimed could be inherited. “A person born to Jewish parents, even if they weren’t raised on the Torah – there are things that are passed on (to him) in the blood, it’s genetic,” he explained. “If the father is a gentile, then the child is deprived of these things.

“I even read in books that sometimes the crime, the difficult traits, the bitterness – a child that comes from these traits, it’s no surprise that he won’t have the qualities that characterize the people of Israel,” he added …

http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4006385,00.html

James von Brunn: The Shimon ben Yohai of "The White Race, " and His Contribution to Holocaustolatry

June 12, 2009

Manchurian candidate, James von Brunn has prepared the altar. Now comes the procession of bishops to incense the idol of Holocaustolatry, once again. The liturgical season of “The Holocaust” never ends.

James von Brunn, like the rabbis, is an anti-Christian racial determinist. He’s mentally programmed to behave in an anti-Christian rabbinic manner. Like the rabbis, who teach that “Amalek” is a genetically programmed enemy of “The Jews” and cannot be reasoned with and therefore must be killed, HERE, HERE, and HERE, so does James von Brunn believe that “The Jews” are genetically programmed enemies of “The White Race” and cannot be reasoned with and therefore must be killed, HERE (scroll to bottom). In essence, there is no difference between James von Brunn and Rabbi Shimon ben Yohai who he paraphrased in the title of his book, Kill the Best Gentiles. But one of these race haters is sainted while the other will live in infamy in accordance with the crazy double-standards of this crazy, racist world, which the bishops honor above all.

And here is Cardinal George sanctifying the “hallowed space” of the U.S. Holocaust Museum and calling for more “education” against every kind of bias (except pro-Judaic bias, of course). No, Cardinal George, the world needs the Gospel, the teachings of Jesus Christ which your elder brothers are attempting to destroy with their “education” and Holocaustolatry.

Cardinal calls shooting at US Holocaust museum ‘appalling’

Friday 12 June 2009

WASHINGTON (CNS) – The president of the United States bishops’ conference called the June 10 shooting at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum that left a security guard dead “appalling”.

James von Brunn, identified as an 88-year-old Holocaust denier and white supremacist, opened fire in the Washington museum and fatally shot guard Stephen Johns, 39, according to The Associated Press.

The shooting “was a deplorable act of violence and a violation of a hallowed space in our nation’s capital,” said Cardinal Francis E. George of Chicago in a statement released June 11 by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Washington.

“This tragic incident only serves to reinforce the need for continued education throughout society against bias of every kind, but most especially racial and religious prejudice,” he said.

In a separate statement Archbishop Donald W. Wuerl of Washington said June 11 the murder was “particularly distressing given the museum’s special mission to educate our world about violence and be a living reminder of the harm that comes from hatred and anger.”

“It is our prayer that Mr. Johns rest in God’s eternal embrace and that this loss be a call to each of us for a renewed commitment to building a world of peace and respect for all people,” Archbishop Wuerl said.

The archdiocese collaborates with the museum, the bishops’ conference and other groups each year to train Catholic school educators to teach their students about anti-Semitism, the Holocaust, prejudice and Catholic-Jewish relations.

In his statement Cardinal George said that that “by preserving the memory of the 6 million Jews who died in the Shoah, the museum speaks to the consciences of all who pass through its doors and hear the powerful stories of the innocent men, women and children who lost their lives at the hands of a criminal regime.”

He noted that annually millions of the visitors to the museum “learn of the dangers of unchecked hatred and of the need to prevent genocide wherever it threatens.”

The cardinal, on behalf of the U.S. bishops, offered condolences to the Johns family and said the Catholic leaders are “committed to promoting human dignity and interreligious peace throughout our nation.”

“We echo the words of Pope Benedict XVI: ‘May the Shoah be a warning for all against forgetfulness, denial or reductionism, because violence committed against one single human being is violence against all,'” he said.

http://www.nzcatholic.org.nz/viewDocument.aspx?DocumentID=1779

James von Brunn: The Shimon ben Yohai of "The White Race, " and His Contribution to Holocaustolatry

June 12, 2009

Manchurian candidate, James von Brunn has prepared the altar. Now comes the procession of bishops to incense the idol of Holocaustolatry, once again. The liturgical season of “The Holocaust” never ends.

James von Brunn, like the rabbis, is an anti-Christian racial determinist. He’s mentally programmed to behave in an anti-Christian rabbinic manner. Like the rabbis, who teach that “Amalek” is a genetically programmed enemy of “The Jews” and cannot be reasoned with and therefore must be killed, HERE, HERE, and HERE, so does James von Brunn believe that “The Jews” are genetically programmed enemies of “The White Race” and cannot be reasoned with and therefore must be killed, HERE (scroll to bottom). In essence, there is no difference between James von Brunn and Rabbi Shimon ben Yohai who he paraphrased in the title of his book, Kill the Best Gentiles. But one of these race haters is sainted while the other will live in infamy in accordance with the crazy double-standards of this crazy, racist world, which the bishops honor above all.

And here is Cardinal George sanctifying the “hallowed space” of the U.S. Holocaust Museum and calling for more “education” against every kind of bias (except pro-Judaic bias, of course). No, Cardinal George, the world needs the Gospel, the teachings of Jesus Christ which your elder brothers are attempting to destroy with their “education” and Holocaustolatry.

Cardinal calls shooting at US Holocaust museum ‘appalling’

Friday 12 June 2009

WASHINGTON (CNS) – The president of the United States bishops’ conference called the June 10 shooting at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum that left a security guard dead “appalling”.

James von Brunn, identified as an 88-year-old Holocaust denier and white supremacist, opened fire in the Washington museum and fatally shot guard Stephen Johns, 39, according to The Associated Press.

The shooting “was a deplorable act of violence and a violation of a hallowed space in our nation’s capital,” said Cardinal Francis E. George of Chicago in a statement released June 11 by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Washington.

“This tragic incident only serves to reinforce the need for continued education throughout society against bias of every kind, but most especially racial and religious prejudice,” he said.

In a separate statement Archbishop Donald W. Wuerl of Washington said June 11 the murder was “particularly distressing given the museum’s special mission to educate our world about violence and be a living reminder of the harm that comes from hatred and anger.”

“It is our prayer that Mr. Johns rest in God’s eternal embrace and that this loss be a call to each of us for a renewed commitment to building a world of peace and respect for all people,” Archbishop Wuerl said.

The archdiocese collaborates with the museum, the bishops’ conference and other groups each year to train Catholic school educators to teach their students about anti-Semitism, the Holocaust, prejudice and Catholic-Jewish relations.

In his statement Cardinal George said that that “by preserving the memory of the 6 million Jews who died in the Shoah, the museum speaks to the consciences of all who pass through its doors and hear the powerful stories of the innocent men, women and children who lost their lives at the hands of a criminal regime.”

He noted that annually millions of the visitors to the museum “learn of the dangers of unchecked hatred and of the need to prevent genocide wherever it threatens.”

The cardinal, on behalf of the U.S. bishops, offered condolences to the Johns family and said the Catholic leaders are “committed to promoting human dignity and interreligious peace throughout our nation.”

“We echo the words of Pope Benedict XVI: ‘May the Shoah be a warning for all against forgetfulness, denial or reductionism, because violence committed against one single human being is violence against all,'” he said.

http://www.nzcatholic.org.nz/viewDocument.aspx?DocumentID=1779

"Israel" "Defense" Force Thugs Beat Palestinian Children 8/15/07

August 21, 2007

Ramallah, 19-08-07: Footage captured by an independent American filmmaker on Wednesday 15 August, showing Israeli soldiers beating, spitting on and throwing stones at three Palestinian children offers yet further proof that Israel’s 543 permanent and 610 ‘flying’ checkpoints “are sites of systematic torture and human rights violations against Palestinian civilians”, said veteran human rights activist, Dr. Mustafa Barghouthi MP at a press conference held in Ramallah today.

The footage was captured at the Ras at-Tira checkpoint in the Qalqiliya District, and shows the three children attempting to cross the checkpoint in a horse cart when they are stopped by two Israeli soldiers. The female soldier is clearly shown beating the boys before spitting on them and sending them back the way they came. Her male colleague is then seen picking up stones from the ground and throwing them at the children as they drive away.

Dr. Barghouthi said the beatings were reminiscent of the physical assault of 18-year old university student Mohammad Jabali by Israeli soldiers near the notorious Huwwara checkpoint in Nablus on 18 March 2007. Four Israeli soldiers punched and kicked Jabali in the face, head and genitals, causing bleeding and a blood clot in his right testicle. Jabali was forced to undergo surgery and to have part of the testicle removed.

Source:

http://www.kabobfest.com/2007/08/footage-of-israeli-soldiers-beating.html

"Israel" "Defense" Force Thugs Beat Palestinian Children 8/15/07

August 21, 2007

Ramallah, 19-08-07: Footage captured by an independent American filmmaker on Wednesday 15 August, showing Israeli soldiers beating, spitting on and throwing stones at three Palestinian children offers yet further proof that Israel’s 543 permanent and 610 ‘flying’ checkpoints “are sites of systematic torture and human rights violations against Palestinian civilians”, said veteran human rights activist, Dr. Mustafa Barghouthi MP at a press conference held in Ramallah today.

The footage was captured at the Ras at-Tira checkpoint in the Qalqiliya District, and shows the three children attempting to cross the checkpoint in a horse cart when they are stopped by two Israeli soldiers. The female soldier is clearly shown beating the boys before spitting on them and sending them back the way they came. Her male colleague is then seen picking up stones from the ground and throwing them at the children as they drive away.

Dr. Barghouthi said the beatings were reminiscent of the physical assault of 18-year old university student Mohammad Jabali by Israeli soldiers near the notorious Huwwara checkpoint in Nablus on 18 March 2007. Four Israeli soldiers punched and kicked Jabali in the face, head and genitals, causing bleeding and a blood clot in his right testicle. Jabali was forced to undergo surgery and to have part of the testicle removed.

Source:

http://www.kabobfest.com/2007/08/footage-of-israeli-soldiers-beating.html

"Israel" "Defense" Force Thugs Beat Palestinian Children 8/15/07

August 21, 2007

Ramallah, 19-08-07: Footage captured by an independent American filmmaker on Wednesday 15 August, showing Israeli soldiers beating, spitting on and throwing stones at three Palestinian children offers yet further proof that Israel’s 543 permanent and 610 ‘flying’ checkpoints “are sites of systematic torture and human rights violations against Palestinian civilians”, said veteran human rights activist, Dr. Mustafa Barghouthi MP at a press conference held in Ramallah today.

The footage was captured at the Ras at-Tira checkpoint in the Qalqiliya District, and shows the three children attempting to cross the checkpoint in a horse cart when they are stopped by two Israeli soldiers. The female soldier is clearly shown beating the boys before spitting on them and sending them back the way they came. Her male colleague is then seen picking up stones from the ground and throwing them at the children as they drive away.

Dr. Barghouthi said the beatings were reminiscent of the physical assault of 18-year old university student Mohammad Jabali by Israeli soldiers near the notorious Huwwara checkpoint in Nablus on 18 March 2007. Four Israeli soldiers punched and kicked Jabali in the face, head and genitals, causing bleeding and a blood clot in his right testicle. Jabali was forced to undergo surgery and to have part of the testicle removed.

Source:

http://www.kabobfest.com/2007/08/footage-of-israeli-soldiers-beating.html

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein Rouses Talmud Apologists

August 4, 2007

The Simon Wiesenthal Center’s Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein (who is also a professor of Talmudic law at Loyola Law School) writes an editorial which on the surface appears to be a response to Noah Feldman’s piece published in the New York Times Magazine in which he candidly speaks of the Judaic tradition of fake benevolence and legalistic murder of non-“Jews” written about here:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/07/new-york-times-reveals-talmudic.html

A few observations: Adlerstein admits not only that there are many passages in the canon of Judaism which are hostile to non-“Jews,” but he also admits that Judaics have covered up the offensive passages as a matter of policy. He clearly takes the position that the offensive passages should be dealt with now only because the debate is unavoidable due to the work of serious researchers of Judaism which is blacked out by the establishment press but which is being spread far and wide via the internet and self-published works.

Adlerstein seems to believe that the murderous racial supremacism of Judaism can be cleared by employing a two-wrongs-make-a-right fallacy of comical disproportion. He attempts to relativise the lying, perversion, murder, hate, racial conceit and double standards of Judaism with the polemics of St. John Chrysostom as if Chrysostom’s sermons are something that Christians have been fearfully hiding for 1600 years. What a laugh! The rabbinic texts have been hidden precisely because there’s something terrible within them. And there’s not the slightest hint from the rabbi that any apology is in order for these offensive passages, much less any revision of them, even as the rabbis take an active part in rewriting Christian exegesis, liturgy, doctrine, history, and teaching material in their image. Always, always the double standard.

Adlerstein sets up a double-minded quagmire revealing many previously hidden rabbinic teachings but then makes the astounding claim that halacha prevents “Jews” from practicing the very things that halacha mandates!

So it appears that a debate has been forced. I don’t know what to expect from such a debate given that we live in a time when Judaics “hold the swords” (to paraphrase Rabbi Jacob Neusner) and when what they’re defending is in essence a tradition of deceit. I’d expect the rabbis to fight every bit as dirty as they have in Talmud debates in past history, and as they do today, jailing their holocaust debate opponents. And I’d expect the Vatican to take the rabbis’ side completely. Perhaps this will, at the very least, expose the “Judeo-Christian tradition” farce and the “elder brothers in the faith” mockery for what they truly are.

Noah Feldman And The Fear Of Being Different

By: Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein
Wednesday, August 1, 2007

Ayatollahs in business suits is what Noah Feldman would have the world believe we all are. If the Orthodox were going to leave him out of his alma mater’s reunion picture just because he married out, then Noah Feldman was going to out the Orthodox.

His tell-all expose painted a picture, as he saw it, of the inherent primitiveness and backwardness of Orthodoxy. We may look modern, but scratch the surface, and we all harbor beliefs that are inconsistent with the more enlightened values of Harvard Square.

In his New York Times Magazine article, Feldman made a point of highlighting practices and attitudes toward non-Jews that he bargained would – or should – make us uncomfortable. We have always preferred to keep them under wraps, not always quite sure how to explain them to others, or even to ourselves, but quite sure that if others found out about them, they would hold them against us.

In making us face up to them Noah Feldman may have done us a favor. We have dealt with “problematic” texts in roughly the same way for the better part of a millennium. The old way will not work any longer, and the sooner we realize and react appropriately, the better.

The medieval church did a good job – often aided and abetted by Jewish apostates – in ferreting out what they saw as anti-gentile and anti-Christian nastiness in the Gemara. Modern anti-Semitic groups have revived the practice, and there are no shortage of websites that will gladly direct you to the exact places in the Talmud that prove we detest all non-Jews, and actively promote their demise.

(I am not saying, God forbid, that Noah Feldman is an anti-Semite.)

One of the prosecution witnesses in the Beilis blood libel was a Fr. Justinas Pranaitis, possibly hired because of his 1892 work “Talmud Unmasked,” still used by Jew-haters today. Most Jews are unaware of the literally thousands of hate sites on the Internet because we simply don’t run into the untermenschen who hang out on such sites. The New York Times Magazine, however, is harder to run from.

Our first line of defense was part of the shah-shtil mentality: we ran for cover. We tried to hide these passages, and if that failed, we reacted with surgically applied apologetics. Someone was always prepared to offer an explanation that seemed somewhat reasonable, and if presented by someone who looked sage and rabbinic enough, the non-Jews could be placated.

This approach will no longer work, because the nature of communications today insures that there are no longer any secrets, period. Almost anything you have ever said or written to anyone can come back to haunt you. An apologetic interpretation of a Talmudic passage – even if entirely correct and authoritative – is often not the only one on the Jewish street. For every politically correct explanation, there is a very non-PC one that can be dredged up in moments through the right search engine There will be many people, perhaps entire communities, who take a different approach. Their little secret will surface to haunt the rest of the Orthodox world.

There is no longer any option other than to own up to difficult sources and uncomfortable attitudes, and to deal openly with them. If we don’t, others will do the talking for us, which we can ill afford. We must learn where these passages are, acknowledge them, and learn to deal with them without hesitation. We will find more understanding and acceptance than we might think.

The first step is to weed out the misquotes and the misunderstood sources. Nine times out of ten, the proof-texts cited by critics are goofy errors. We must learn what the errors are, and be quick to demonstrate the fallacies.

The remaining ten percent can still do much damage. But they don’t have to – and won’t for most decent people – for several reasons.

First of all, many of them are a product of their times. Certain references to early Christians are a case in point. Can you discuss these passages with a believing Catholic without upping your life insurance? Of course you can. The person who taught me how was a Catholic priest and scholar with whom I once shared a platform at Loyola Law School.

A question arose about John Chrysostom, the fourth century Church Father who put the charge of deicide on the map. His vitriol against Jews was surpassed by none and was embraced for centuries thereafter, including by the Nazis.

Chrysostom remains a saint in the Church, and many Jews get unhinged by the mention of his name. The priest, however, was completely unfazed by the question, and calmly related that in the fourth century the Church was fighting for survival and felt very pressured by Judaism. Besides which, it was characteristic of the times for people to use the most extreme and abusive language in dealing with opponents. Contemporary Christians simply reject the entire package. Essentially he said, “That’s the way we once behaved, regrettably. We’ve moved on since then.”

What’s good for the goose is good for the gandz. Mutatis mutandis, some disparaging remarks in the Talmud against early Christians should be understandable to today’s Christians, if only as an exercise in parity. We ought not – and should not – expect them to be pleased by the language. But we have an argument in equity that they should be able to tolerate their existence, in the same way that similar (or much worse) passages regarding the Jews appear in their literature.

The passages in the Talmud that deal with Jesus himself (if they in fact do – the Rishonim, our great medieval commentators, were split on this), in far less than complimentary fashion, can be dealt with similarly.

There are yet other passages that are extremely dismissive of categories of non-Jews. Many of them, in fact, were aimed not at all non-Jews but at the idolatrous near-savages known to Chazal. To be sure, there are disputes going back to the Rishonim as to which passages refer to which groups. But many Jews are unaware as to how many mainstream decisors restricted the application of certain Gemaros to idolators, explicitly excluding the civilized folks among whom we live today.

It is also more than probable that part of the reason that this distinction is not embraced more widely is connected to the horrific experience Eastern European Jews in particular had with their non-Jewish neighbors for hundreds of years. It is frustrating to many of us that some people have not sufficiently appreciated the difference between the NKVD and the IRS. Even in this regard, my experience is that non-Jews of good will (and there are huge numbers of them in this great country) understand that habits born of eight hundred years of experience can take a while to extinguish, and are far less demanding and hostile than we might think.

There are other Talmudic sections that are not products of special conditions, and still spell out favorable treatment of Jews relative to non-Jews. These, too, are a cause for consternation for many Jews. They should not be. Almost every religious group we know of makes some claim to specialness, usually both theoretically and practically. These groups celebrate difference, and readily accept that other communities are entitled to extend privileges to the inner group as well. We Jews do not stand out in this regard so much as fit into the general trend.

Resorting to cheap innuendo, Feldman creates images and identities aimed at conveying to his reader the notion that Orthodox Jews do not, in fact, fit into the modern world. (This is not surprising. Feldman provided legal help pro bono to the city of Tenafly, New Jersey, when it sought to bar the construction of an eruv.)

Tefillin he pairs with the painful cilice of the priest-zealot of The Da Vinci Code; the silly little “fringed prayer shawl” that Jews wear under their shirts he pairs with the holy undergarment of Mormons, asking aloud why it is that Joe Lieberman was not perceived the way some see the Mormonism of Mitt Romney – as something “weird.”

Feldman, I believe, is blind here as well to the truth. Whether he wins the presidency or not, the vast majority of Americans will not reject Mitt Romney because they see Mormon belief and practice as beyond the pale.

I will put it simply: Why don’t I worry about the unusualness of Mormon belief? Mostly because I have never met a Mormon I didn’t like. (I’m sure that I could be introduced to a few, and there is also the irritating issue of posthumous baptism of Jews that many – especially Holocaust survivors – are upset about, particularly the glacial progress toward a definitive solution.)

My point is that for most Americans, actions are far more important than theology. They really don’t care what other people believe, as long as they act appropriately. If they are good, caring citizens, their beliefs – and claims of specialness in the eyes of the Lord – are just not so important.

Jews should listen up. Be a good neighbor, and you can sing a three-part harmonic ode to R. Yehuda Halevi’s special Jewish soul and most non-Jews will not hold it against you. Parts of certain chassidic communities are hardly the leaders of the pack in pushing for intergroup connection and acceptance, but tens of thousands of New Yorkers will remember them as the group that set up tables on 9/11 to provide drinks for the dazed and thirsty who fled across the bridge to Brooklyn.

There is one final argument. Part of what goes through our heads every time we encounter a Gemara that emphasizes some Jewish-gentile difference is that non-Jews will sense a slippery slope, at the base of which wait crusading Jews ready to behead all of them and impale their remains on sharpened Magen Davids.

We must confidently know ourselves – and convey to others – an overarching reality about traditional Jews: We are a legal community. Hostile attitudes can go only so far without hitting a firm halachic roadblock. No matter what animus some Jews might have for outsiders, they don’t murder, rape or maim. They cannot steal, lie or deceive without running afoul of clear-cut halachot.

Putting it all together, we have nothing to be ashamed of, nothing to hide. Putting aside those who have it in for us no matter what we do, the good folks of America will not find our life-style off-putting. I have been challenged several times by Jews who have rejected tradition. “Aren’t you ashamed to be part of system that says X, Y and Z about non-Jews? What if they find out?” They react with incredulity when I tell them that I discuss X, Y and Z openly with non-Jewish friends without embarrassment and without ill effect. But it is the truth.

Noah Feldman makes the mistake of so many others who believe that it is dangerous and unacceptable for Jews to act or believe differently from their fellow citizens. He is part of that large group of Jews who have felicitously been described as “proud to be ashamed Jews.”

It is a malady common to people who have little confidence in their own belief system. It has little to do with vast swaths of America, inhabited by people who are proud of their own beliefs and sympathetic to the strongly-held beliefs of others. If we remember that, we needn’t be silenced or embarrassed by the charges of the Noah Feldmans of our times.

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein is the director of Interfaith Affairs of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, teaches Jewish Law at Loyola Law School, and is a senior editor of Cross-Currents.org, where this first appeared.

http://www.jewishpress.com/page.do/22684/Noah_Feldman_And_The_Fear_Of_Being_Different.html

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein Rouses Talmud Apologists

August 4, 2007

The Simon Wiesenthal Center’s Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein (who is also a professor of Talmudic law at Loyola Law School) writes an editorial which on the surface appears to be a response to Noah Feldman’s piece published in the New York Times Magazine in which he candidly speaks of the Judaic tradition of fake benevolence and legalistic murder of non-“Jews” written about here:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/07/new-york-times-reveals-talmudic.html

A few observations: Adlerstein admits not only that there are many passages in the canon of Judaism which are hostile to non-“Jews,” but he also admits that Judaics have covered up the offensive passages as a matter of policy. He clearly takes the position that the offensive passages should be dealt with now only because the debate is unavoidable due to the work of serious researchers of Judaism which is blacked out by the establishment press but which is being spread far and wide via the internet and self-published works.

Adlerstein seems to believe that the murderous racial supremacism of Judaism can be cleared by employing a two-wrongs-make-a-right fallacy of comical disproportion. He attempts to relativise the lying, perversion, murder, hate, racial conceit and double standards of Judaism with the polemics of St. John Chrysostom as if Chrysostom’s sermons are something that Christians have been fearfully hiding for 1600 years. What a laugh! The rabbinic texts have been hidden precisely because there’s something terrible within them. And there’s not the slightest hint from the rabbi that any apology is in order for these offensive passages, much less any revision of them, even as the rabbis take an active part in rewriting Christian exegesis, liturgy, doctrine, history, and teaching material in their image. Always, always the double standard.

Adlerstein sets up a double-minded quagmire revealing many previously hidden rabbinic teachings but then making the astounding claim that halacha prevents “Jews” from practicing the very things that halacha mandates!

So it appears that a debate has been forced. I don’t know what to expect from such a debate given that we live in a time when Judaics “hold the swords” (to paraphrase Rabbi Jacob Neusner) and when what they’re defending is in essence a tradition of deceit. I’d expect the rabbis to fight every bit as dirty as they have in Talmud debates in past history, and as they do today, jailing their holocaust debate opponents. And I’d expect the Vatican to take the rabbis’ side completely. Perhaps this will, at the very least, expose the “Judeo-Christian tradition” farce and the “elder brothers in the faith” mockery for what they truly are.

Noah Feldman And The Fear Of Being Different

By: Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein
Wednesday, August 1, 2007

Ayatollahs in business suits is what Noah Feldman would have the world believe we all are. If the Orthodox were going to leave him out of his alma mater’s reunion picture just because he married out, then Noah Feldman was going to out the Orthodox.

His tell-all expose painted a picture, as he saw it, of the inherent primitiveness and backwardness of Orthodoxy. We may look modern, but scratch the surface, and we all harbor beliefs that are inconsistent with the more enlightened values of Harvard Square.

In his New York Times Magazine article, Feldman made a point of highlighting practices and attitudes toward non-Jews that he bargained would – or should – make us uncomfortable. We have always preferred to keep them under wraps, not always quite sure how to explain them to others, or even to ourselves, but quite sure that if others found out about them, they would hold them against us.

In making us face up to them Noah Feldman may have done us a favor. We have dealt with “problematic” texts in roughly the same way for the better part of a millennium. The old way will not work any longer, and the sooner we realize and react appropriately, the better.

The medieval church did a good job – often aided and abetted by Jewish apostates – in ferreting out what they saw as anti-gentile and anti-Christian nastiness in the Gemara. Modern anti-Semitic groups have revived the practice, and there are no shortage of websites that will gladly direct you to the exact places in the Talmud that prove we detest all non-Jews, and actively promote their demise.

(I am not saying, God forbid, that Noah Feldman is an anti-Semite.)

One of the prosecution witnesses in the Beilis blood libel was a Fr. Justinas Pranaitis, possibly hired because of his 1892 work “Talmud Unmasked,” still used by Jew-haters today. Most Jews are unaware of the literally thousands of hate sites on the Internet because we simply don’t run into the untermenschen who hang out on such sites. The New York Times Magazine, however, is harder to run from.

Our first line of defense was part of the shah-shtil mentality: we ran for cover. We tried to hide these passages, and if that failed, we reacted with surgically applied apologetics. Someone was always prepared to offer an explanation that seemed somewhat reasonable, and if presented by someone who looked sage and rabbinic enough, the non-Jews could be placated.

This approach will no longer work, because the nature of communications today insures that there are no longer any secrets, period. Almost anything you have ever said or written to anyone can come back to haunt you. An apologetic interpretation of a Talmudic passage – even if entirely correct and authoritative – is often not the only one on the Jewish street. For every politically correct explanation, there is a very non-PC one that can be dredged up in moments through the right search engine There will be many people, perhaps entire communities, who take a different approach. Their little secret will surface to haunt the rest of the Orthodox world.

There is no longer any option other than to own up to difficult sources and uncomfortable attitudes, and to deal openly with them. If we don’t, others will do the talking for us, which we can ill afford. We must learn where these passages are, acknowledge them, and learn to deal with them without hesitation. We will find more understanding and acceptance than we might think.

The first step is to weed out the misquotes and the misunderstood sources. Nine times out of ten, the proof-texts cited by critics are goofy errors. We must learn what the errors are, and be quick to demonstrate the fallacies.

The remaining ten percent can still do much damage. But they don’t have to – and won’t for most decent people – for several reasons.

First of all, many of them are a product of their times. Certain references to early Christians are a case in point. Can you discuss these passages with a believing Catholic without upping your life insurance? Of course you can. The person who taught me how was a Catholic priest and scholar with whom I once shared a platform at Loyola Law School.

A question arose about John Chrysostom, the fourth century Church Father who put the charge of deicide on the map. His vitriol against Jews was surpassed by none and was embraced for centuries thereafter, including by the Nazis.

Chrysostom remains a saint in the Church, and many Jews get unhinged by the mention of his name. The priest, however, was completely unfazed by the question, and calmly related that in the fourth century the Church was fighting for survival and felt very pressured by Judaism. Besides which, it was characteristic of the times for people to use the most extreme and abusive language in dealing with opponents. Contemporary Christians simply reject the entire package. Essentially he said, “That’s the way we once behaved, regrettably. We’ve moved on since then.”

What’s good for the goose is good for the gandz. Mutatis mutandis, some disparaging remarks in the Talmud against early Christians should be understandable to today’s Christians, if only as an exercise in parity. We ought not – and should not – expect them to be pleased by the language. But we have an argument in equity that they should be able to tolerate their existence, in the same way that similar (or much worse) passages regarding the Jews appear in their literature.

The passages in the Talmud that deal with Jesus himself (if they in fact do – the Rishonim, our great medieval commentators, were split on this), in far less than complimentary fashion, can be dealt with similarly.

There are yet other passages that are extremely dismissive of categories of non-Jews. Many of them, in fact, were aimed not at all non-Jews but at the idolatrous near-savages known to Chazal. To be sure, there are disputes going back to the Rishonim as to which passages refer to which groups. But many Jews are unaware as to how many mainstream decisors restricted the application of certain Gemaros to idolators, explicitly excluding the civilized folks among whom we live today.

It is also more than probable that part of the reason that this distinction is not embraced more widely is connected to the horrific experience Eastern European Jews in particular had with their non-Jewish neighbors for hundreds of years. It is frustrating to many of us that some people have not sufficiently appreciated the difference between the NKVD and the IRS. Even in this regard, my experience is that non-Jews of good will (and there are huge numbers of them in this great country) understand that habits born of eight hundred years of experience can take a while to extinguish, and are far less demanding and hostile than we might think.

There are other Talmudic sections that are not products of special conditions, and still spell out favorable treatment of Jews relative to non-Jews. These, too, are a cause for consternation for many Jews. They should not be. Almost every religious group we know of makes some claim to specialness, usually both theoretically and practically. These groups celebrate difference, and readily accept that other communities are entitled to extend privileges to the inner group as well. We Jews do not stand out in this regard so much as fit into the general trend.

Resorting to cheap innuendo, Feldman creates images and identities aimed at conveying to his reader the notion that Orthodox Jews do not, in fact, fit into the modern world. (This is not surprising. Feldman provided legal help pro bono to the city of Tenafly, New Jersey, when it sought to bar the construction of an eruv.)

Tefillin he pairs with the painful cilice of the priest-zealot of The Da Vinci Code; the silly little “fringed prayer shawl” that Jews wear under their shirts he pairs with the holy undergarment of Mormons, asking aloud why it is that Joe Lieberman was not perceived the way some see the Mormonism of Mitt Romney – as something “weird.”

Feldman, I believe, is blind here as well to the truth. Whether he wins the presidency or not, the vast majority of Americans will not reject Mitt Romney because they see Mormon belief and practice as beyond the pale.

I will put it simply: Why don’t I worry about the unusualness of Mormon belief? Mostly because I have never met a Mormon I didn’t like. (I’m sure that I could be introduced to a few, and there is also the irritating issue of posthumous baptism of Jews that many – especially Holocaust survivors – are upset about, particularly the glacial progress toward a definitive solution.)

My point is that for most Americans, actions are far more important than theology. They really don’t care what other people believe, as long as they act appropriately. If they are good, caring citizens, their beliefs – and claims of specialness in the eyes of the Lord – are just not so important.

Jews should listen up. Be a good neighbor, and you can sing a three-part harmonic ode to R. Yehuda Halevi’s special Jewish soul and most non-Jews will not hold it against you. Parts of certain chassidic communities are hardly the leaders of the pack in pushing for intergroup connection and acceptance, but tens of thousands of New Yorkers will remember them as the group that set up tables on 9/11 to provide drinks for the dazed and thirsty who fled across the bridge to Brooklyn.

There is one final argument. Part of what goes through our heads every time we encounter a Gemara that emphasizes some Jewish-gentile difference is that non-Jews will sense a slippery slope, at the base of which wait crusading Jews ready to behead all of them and impale their remains on sharpened Magen Davids.

We must confidently know ourselves – and convey to others – an overarching reality about traditional Jews: We are a legal community. Hostile attitudes can go only so far without hitting a firm halachic roadblock. No matter what animus some Jews might have for outsiders, they don’t murder, rape or maim. They cannot steal, lie or deceive without running afoul of clear-cut halachot.

Putting it all together, we have nothing to be ashamed of, nothing to hide. Putting aside those who have it in for us no matter what we do, the good folks of America will not find our life-style off-putting. I have been challenged several times by Jews who have rejected tradition. “Aren’t you ashamed to be part of system that says X, Y and Z about non-Jews? What if they find out?” They react with incredulity when I tell them that I discuss X, Y and Z openly with non-Jewish friends without embarrassment and without ill effect. But it is the truth.

Noah Feldman makes the mistake of so many others who believe that it is dangerous and unacceptable for Jews to act or believe differently from their fellow citizens. He is part of that large group of Jews who have felicitously been described as “proud to be ashamed Jews.”

It is a malady common to people who have little confidence in their own belief system. It has little to do with vast swaths of America, inhabited by people who are proud of their own beliefs and sympathetic to the strongly-held beliefs of others. If we remember that, we needn’t be silenced or embarrassed by the charges of the Noah Feldmans of our times.

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein is the director of Interfaith Affairs of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, teaches Jewish Law at Loyola Law School, and is a senior editor of Cross-Currents.org, where this first appeared.

http://www.jewishpress.com/page.do/22684/Noah_Feldman_And_The_Fear_Of_Being_Different.html

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein Rouses Talmud Apologists

August 4, 2007

The Simon Wiesenthal Center’s Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein (who is also a professor of Talmudic law at Loyola Law School) writes an editorial which on the surface appears to be a response to Noah Feldman’s piece published in the New York Times Magazine in which he candidly speaks of the Judaic tradition of fake benevolence and legalistic murder of non-“Jews” written about here:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/07/new-york-times-reveals-talmudic.html

A few observations: Adlerstein admits not only that there are many passages in the canon of Judaism which are hostile to non-“Jews,” but he also admits that Judaics have covered up the offensive passages as a matter of policy. He clearly takes the position that the offensive passages should be dealt with now only because the debate is unavoidable due to the work of serious researchers of Judaism which is blacked out by the establishment press but which is being spread far and wide via the internet and self-published works.

Adlerstein seems to believe that the murderous racial supremacism of Judaism can be cleared by employing a two-wrongs-make-a-right fallacy of comical disproportion. He attempts to relativise the lying, perversion, murder, hate, racial conceit and double standards of Judaism with the polemics of St. John Chrysostom as if Chrysostom’s sermons are something that Christians have been fearfully hiding for 1600 years. What a laugh! The rabbinic texts have been hidden precisely because there’s something terrible within them. And there’s not the slightest hint from the rabbi that any apology is in order for these offensive passages, much less any revision of them, even as the rabbis take an active part in rewriting Christian exegesis, liturgy, doctrine, history, and teaching material in their image. Always, always the double standard.

Adlerstein sets up a double-minded quagmire revealing many previously hidden rabbinic teachings but then makes the astounding claim that halacha prevents “Jews” from practicing the very things that halacha mandates!

So it appears that a debate has been forced. I don’t know what to expect from such a debate given that we live in a time when Judaics “hold the swords” (to paraphrase Rabbi Jacob Neusner) and when what they’re defending is in essence a tradition of deceit. I’d expect the rabbis to fight every bit as dirty as they have in Talmud debates in past history, and as they do today, jailing their holocaust debate opponents. And I’d expect the Vatican to take the rabbis’ side completely. Perhaps this will, at the very least, expose the “Judeo-Christian tradition” farce and the “elder brothers in the faith” mockery for what they truly are.

Noah Feldman And The Fear Of Being Different

By: Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein
Wednesday, August 1, 2007

Ayatollahs in business suits is what Noah Feldman would have the world believe we all are. If the Orthodox were going to leave him out of his alma mater’s reunion picture just because he married out, then Noah Feldman was going to out the Orthodox.

His tell-all expose painted a picture, as he saw it, of the inherent primitiveness and backwardness of Orthodoxy. We may look modern, but scratch the surface, and we all harbor beliefs that are inconsistent with the more enlightened values of Harvard Square.

In his New York Times Magazine article, Feldman made a point of highlighting practices and attitudes toward non-Jews that he bargained would – or should – make us uncomfortable. We have always preferred to keep them under wraps, not always quite sure how to explain them to others, or even to ourselves, but quite sure that if others found out about them, they would hold them against us.

In making us face up to them Noah Feldman may have done us a favor. We have dealt with “problematic” texts in roughly the same way for the better part of a millennium. The old way will not work any longer, and the sooner we realize and react appropriately, the better.

The medieval church did a good job – often aided and abetted by Jewish apostates – in ferreting out what they saw as anti-gentile and anti-Christian nastiness in the Gemara. Modern anti-Semitic groups have revived the practice, and there are no shortage of websites that will gladly direct you to the exact places in the Talmud that prove we detest all non-Jews, and actively promote their demise.

(I am not saying, God forbid, that Noah Feldman is an anti-Semite.)

One of the prosecution witnesses in the Beilis blood libel was a Fr. Justinas Pranaitis, possibly hired because of his 1892 work “Talmud Unmasked,” still used by Jew-haters today. Most Jews are unaware of the literally thousands of hate sites on the Internet because we simply don’t run into the untermenschen who hang out on such sites. The New York Times Magazine, however, is harder to run from.

Our first line of defense was part of the shah-shtil mentality: we ran for cover. We tried to hide these passages, and if that failed, we reacted with surgically applied apologetics. Someone was always prepared to offer an explanation that seemed somewhat reasonable, and if presented by someone who looked sage and rabbinic enough, the non-Jews could be placated.

This approach will no longer work, because the nature of communications today insures that there are no longer any secrets, period. Almost anything you have ever said or written to anyone can come back to haunt you. An apologetic interpretation of a Talmudic passage – even if entirely correct and authoritative – is often not the only one on the Jewish street. For every politically correct explanation, there is a very non-PC one that can be dredged up in moments through the right search engine There will be many people, perhaps entire communities, who take a different approach. Their little secret will surface to haunt the rest of the Orthodox world.

There is no longer any option other than to own up to difficult sources and uncomfortable attitudes, and to deal openly with them. If we don’t, others will do the talking for us, which we can ill afford. We must learn where these passages are, acknowledge them, and learn to deal with them without hesitation. We will find more understanding and acceptance than we might think.

The first step is to weed out the misquotes and the misunderstood sources. Nine times out of ten, the proof-texts cited by critics are goofy errors. We must learn what the errors are, and be quick to demonstrate the fallacies.

The remaining ten percent can still do much damage. But they don’t have to – and won’t for most decent people – for several reasons.

First of all, many of them are a product of their times. Certain references to early Christians are a case in point. Can you discuss these passages with a believing Catholic without upping your life insurance? Of course you can. The person who taught me how was a Catholic priest and scholar with whom I once shared a platform at Loyola Law School.

A question arose about John Chrysostom, the fourth century Church Father who put the charge of deicide on the map. His vitriol against Jews was surpassed by none and was embraced for centuries thereafter, including by the Nazis.

Chrysostom remains a saint in the Church, and many Jews get unhinged by the mention of his name. The priest, however, was completely unfazed by the question, and calmly related that in the fourth century the Church was fighting for survival and felt very pressured by Judaism. Besides which, it was characteristic of the times for people to use the most extreme and abusive language in dealing with opponents. Contemporary Christians simply reject the entire package. Essentially he said, “That’s the way we once behaved, regrettably. We’ve moved on since then.”

What’s good for the goose is good for the gandz. Mutatis mutandis, some disparaging remarks in the Talmud against early Christians should be understandable to today’s Christians, if only as an exercise in parity. We ought not – and should not – expect them to be pleased by the language. But we have an argument in equity that they should be able to tolerate their existence, in the same way that similar (or much worse) passages regarding the Jews appear in their literature.

The passages in the Talmud that deal with Jesus himself (if they in fact do – the Rishonim, our great medieval commentators, were split on this), in far less than complimentary fashion, can be dealt with similarly.

There are yet other passages that are extremely dismissive of categories of non-Jews. Many of them, in fact, were aimed not at all non-Jews but at the idolatrous near-savages known to Chazal. To be sure, there are disputes going back to the Rishonim as to which passages refer to which groups. But many Jews are unaware as to how many mainstream decisors restricted the application of certain Gemaros to idolators, explicitly excluding the civilized folks among whom we live today.

It is also more than probable that part of the reason that this distinction is not embraced more widely is connected to the horrific experience Eastern European Jews in particular had with their non-Jewish neighbors for hundreds of years. It is frustrating to many of us that some people have not sufficiently appreciated the difference between the NKVD and the IRS. Even in this regard, my experience is that non-Jews of good will (and there are huge numbers of them in this great country) understand that habits born of eight hundred years of experience can take a while to extinguish, and are far less demanding and hostile than we might think.

There are other Talmudic sections that are not products of special conditions, and still spell out favorable treatment of Jews relative to non-Jews. These, too, are a cause for consternation for many Jews. They should not be. Almost every religious group we know of makes some claim to specialness, usually both theoretically and practically. These groups celebrate difference, and readily accept that other communities are entitled to extend privileges to the inner group as well. We Jews do not stand out in this regard so much as fit into the general trend.

Resorting to cheap innuendo, Feldman creates images and identities aimed at conveying to his reader the notion that Orthodox Jews do not, in fact, fit into the modern world. (This is not surprising. Feldman provided legal help pro bono to the city of Tenafly, New Jersey, when it sought to bar the construction of an eruv.)

Tefillin he pairs with the painful cilice of the priest-zealot of The Da Vinci Code; the silly little “fringed prayer shawl” that Jews wear under their shirts he pairs with the holy undergarment of Mormons, asking aloud why it is that Joe Lieberman was not perceived the way some see the Mormonism of Mitt Romney – as something “weird.”

Feldman, I believe, is blind here as well to the truth. Whether he wins the presidency or not, the vast majority of Americans will not reject Mitt Romney because they see Mormon belief and practice as beyond the pale.

I will put it simply: Why don’t I worry about the unusualness of Mormon belief? Mostly because I have never met a Mormon I didn’t like. (I’m sure that I could be introduced to a few, and there is also the irritating issue of posthumous baptism of Jews that many – especially Holocaust survivors – are upset about, particularly the glacial progress toward a definitive solution.)

My point is that for most Americans, actions are far more important than theology. They really don’t care what other people believe, as long as they act appropriately. If they are good, caring citizens, their beliefs – and claims of specialness in the eyes of the Lord – are just not so important.

Jews should listen up. Be a good neighbor, and you can sing a three-part harmonic ode to R. Yehuda Halevi’s special Jewish soul and most non-Jews will not hold it against you. Parts of certain chassidic communities are hardly the leaders of the pack in pushing for intergroup connection and acceptance, but tens of thousands of New Yorkers will remember them as the group that set up tables on 9/11 to provide drinks for the dazed and thirsty who fled across the bridge to Brooklyn.

There is one final argument. Part of what goes through our heads every time we encounter a Gemara that emphasizes some Jewish-gentile difference is that non-Jews will sense a slippery slope, at the base of which wait crusading Jews ready to behead all of them and impale their remains on sharpened Magen Davids.

We must confidently know ourselves – and convey to others – an overarching reality about traditional Jews: We are a legal community. Hostile attitudes can go only so far without hitting a firm halachic roadblock. No matter what animus some Jews might have for outsiders, they don’t murder, rape or maim. They cannot steal, lie or deceive without running afoul of clear-cut halachot.

Putting it all together, we have nothing to be ashamed of, nothing to hide. Putting aside those who have it in for us no matter what we do, the good folks of America will not find our life-style off-putting. I have been challenged several times by Jews who have rejected tradition. “Aren’t you ashamed to be part of system that says X, Y and Z about non-Jews? What if they find out?” They react with incredulity when I tell them that I discuss X, Y and Z openly with non-Jewish friends without embarrassment and without ill effect. But it is the truth.

Noah Feldman makes the mistake of so many others who believe that it is dangerous and unacceptable for Jews to act or believe differently from their fellow citizens. He is part of that large group of Jews who have felicitously been described as “proud to be ashamed Jews.”

It is a malady common to people who have little confidence in their own belief system. It has little to do with vast swaths of America, inhabited by people who are proud of their own beliefs and sympathetic to the strongly-held beliefs of others. If we remember that, we needn’t be silenced or embarrassed by the charges of the Noah Feldmans of our times.

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein is the director of Interfaith Affairs of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, teaches Jewish Law at Loyola Law School, and is a senior editor of Cross-Currents.org, where this first appeared.

http://www.jewishpress.com/page.do/22684/Noah_Feldman_And_The_Fear_Of_Being_Different.html