Archive for the ‘Rabbi Arthur Schneier’ Category

NY Archbishop Dolan: "The Holocaust" "Demands" "Memory," "To Forget is Heretical"

April 27, 2010

When is the last time you heard a modern prelate mention the term, heresy, in its proper context, in relation to the perennial teachings of the Church?

In a recent ceremony commemorating Pope Benedict’s visit to a synagogue during his U.S. visit in 2008, Archbishop Timothy Dolan of New York spoke on the importance of Catholic-Jewish relations, stressing that the two must focus on their commonality and work together to preserve the “memory” of the faith.

Archbishop Dolan gave his remarks at the unveiling of a commemorative plaque at Park East Synagogue in New York City on April 22 …

“Both of our traditions reverence memory,” he asserted. “’To forget’ is disastrous, dangerous, and heretical. We both worry about an amnesia that seems a part of today’s existence, to live only for the now, unconscious of our roots, our foundations.”

“It is my hope that in the many years God may give me as Archbishop of New York, our Catholic-Jewish dialogue may be marked by a practice of ‘memory’ which never fails to hold us mutually accountable to the honesty and transparency demanded by the tragedy of the Holocaust, but also to a ‘mutuality’ of concern for each other which places our friendship first, and our grievances second. Our dialogue must never be reduced to one of exchanged grievances.” (“Archbishop Dolan: Catholics and Jews must work to preserve ‘memory’ of faith,” Catholic News Agency, Apr 27, 2010)

In fact, “our dialogue” is an arrangement in which one side “remembers” and expresses its grievances for which it offers no forgiveness while the other makes unending concessions from which even core beliefs are not spared. This is not dialogue and it’s not friendship. It’s enslavement.

Will traditionalists stand against the enslaving modernist dogma of Holocaustolatry which has been enshrined in the Catholic Church?

On Bishop Williamson’s Second Apology

February 27, 2009

Bishop Williamson has apologized again, inappropriately in my view, for the shock and awe campaign that has come as a response to his public expression of his thoughts on certain elements of “Holocaust” doctrine. In fact, the responsibility for the calamitous, altogether disconnected and disproportionate reaction of this past month lies squarely on the rabbis and Judaic power-brokers and their accomplices in governments, in the media, in the curia and in the parishes directly involved in it; a reaction which has all of the proportion and justice of the December 2008 Gaza massacre. I disagree with the suggestion that a few words spoken by the Bishop are the cause of all this. Let’s not validate the absurd notion that lynch-mob behavior is a normal or acceptable, inevitable response to controversy and that Catholics must tailor their words, nay, their thoughts, to forestall it.

What is most disconcerting about Bp. Williamson’s apology, however, is the closing line: “As the Holy Father has said, every act of unjust violence against one man hurts all mankind.” HERE

This is a clear reference to Benedict’s shameful Holocaust sermon of January 28th, 2008 where he proclaimed, “May the Shoah be for all a warning against forgetfulness, against denial or reductionism, because the violence against a single human being is violence against all.” HERE

I don’t care to speculate on the motivations behind Bp. Williamson’s adoption of Bendict’s foreign language from his recent “Holocaust” sermon [see footnote]. I am also bewildered by Bishop Fellay’s reported adoption of the “elder brothers” language on the lips of every crypto-rabbi in Rome today. This is not consistent with the SSPX message which has it that the society intends to bring Rome to Tradition. These statements, if taken at face value, indicate a new synthesis produced by this recent “Holocaust” debacle sending the SSPX off its stated course considerably.

If the price of admission into dialog with Rome on the errors of the Vatican II Council is adopting Rome’s strange language and ideas concerning the “elder brothers” it would seem to be a case of straining out a gnat while swallowing a camel in my estimation–not worth it; a deal the Archbishop would have scoffed at.

I warn that the rabbis would not be satisfied, nor do I believe that Rome would grant “full communion,” until “Rabbi Larry” and his cronies are preaching Holocaustolatry in SSPX schools and seminaries as they already do in Novus Ordo schools and seminaries HERE. Apologies from “Holocaust deniers” (who the rabbis, madmen that they are, place on par with the perpetrators of “The Holocaust”) are inconsequential. There is no forgiveness for them. The only acceptable reparation is that they be imprisoned, cast out, or otherwise silenced, but more importantly, that their followers subsequently be mindbombed with Holocaust dogma. Benedict’s elder brother, Rabbi Arthur Schneier proclaimed as much at the Vatican last week:

“… how can we but revolt at Holocaust-denial? Victims of the Holocaust have not given us the right to forgive the perpetrators nor the Holocaust deniers … we must transmit “never again” through Holocaust education to future generations …”

Pope and Pharisees Preach More Holocaustolatry

A spokesperson for Yad Vashem has stated the same in response to Bishop Williamson’s apology:

“The millions of Jews that were murdered in the Holocaust and the survivors who were persecuted are not waiting for [Bp. Williamson’s] apology,” said Iris Rosenberg, spokeswoman of the Yad Vashem Holocaust museum in Jerusalem. “If he is looking to repent, he needs to admit that he was wrong in denying the truth. This is much more important to the people he claims to lead.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090226/ap_on_re_eu/eu_italy_holocaust_denial

What is important to Yad Vashem is not an apology from Bishop Williamson, but conforming the minds of his followers to “Holocaust” dogma, and Yad Vashem has many accomplices in Rome who have already made “Holocaust” dogma standard curriculum in Novus Ordo Catholic schools and seminaries. A true traditional Catholic alternative to their kosher schools and seminaries is not acceptable to them.

Have no doubt, as the Vatican currently stands, this is what “full communion” entails.

My prayers are with the SSPX leadership. I cannot imagine the pressure that’s upon them.

Footnote: Benedict stated, “violence committed against any one single human being is violence against all humanity. No man is an island, a well known poet once wrote.” That poet is Anglican priest, John Donne who was steeped in the Pantheism, Hermeticism, and Kabbalism of the Renaissance, but the concept Benedict draws on is actually founded in Babylonian Talmud, tractate Sanhedrin 37a and applies only to “Jews:” “Whosoever destroys a single soul of Israel, scripture imputes [guilt] to him as if he had destroyed a complete world.” Contrary to what Talmud suggests, this idea is not found in biblical Scripture.

On Bishop Williamson’s Second Apology

February 27, 2009

Bishop Williamson has apologized again, inappropriately in my view, for the shock and awe campaign that has come as a response to his public expression of his thoughts on certain elements of “Holocaust” doctrine. In fact, the responsibility for the calamitous, altogether disconnected and disproportionate reaction of this past month lies squarely on the rabbis and Judaic power-brokers and their accomplices in governments, in the media, in the curia and in the parishes directly involved in it; a reaction which has all of the proportion and justice of the December 2008 Gaza massacre. I disagree with the suggestion that a few words spoken by the Bishop are the cause of all this. Let’s not validate the absurd notion that lynch-mob behavior is a normal or acceptable, inevitable response to controversy and that Catholics must tailor their words, nay, their thoughts, to forestall it.

What is most disconcerting about Bp. Williamson’s apology, however, is the closing line: “As the Holy Father has said, every act of unjust violence against one man hurts all mankind.” HERE

This is a clear reference to Benedict’s shameful Holocaust sermon of January 28th, 2008 where he proclaimed, “May the Shoah be for all a warning against forgetfulness, against denial or reductionism, because the violence against a single human being is violence against all.” HERE

I don’t care to speculate on the motivations behind Bp. Williamson’s adoption of Bendict’s foreign language from his recent “Holocaust” sermon [see footnote]. I am also bewildered by Bishop Fellay’s reported adoption of the “elder brothers” language on the lips of every crypto-rabbi in Rome today. This is not consistent with the SSPX message which has it that the society intends to bring Rome to Tradition. These statements, if taken at face value, indicate a new synthesis produced by this recent “Holocaust” debacle sending the SSPX off its stated course considerably.

If the price of admission into dialog with Rome on the errors of the Vatican II Council is adopting Rome’s strange language and ideas concerning the “elder brothers” it would seem to be a case of straining out a gnat while swallowing a camel in my estimation–not worth it; a deal the Archbishop would have scoffed at.

I warn that the rabbis would not be satisfied, nor do I believe that Rome would grant “full communion,” until “Rabbi Larry” and his cronies are preaching Holocaustolatry in SSPX schools and seminaries as they already do in Novus Ordo schools and seminaries HERE. Apologies from “Holocaust deniers” (who the rabbis, madmen that they are, place on par with the perpetrators of “The Holocaust”) are inconsequential. There is no forgiveness for them. The only acceptable reparation is that they be imprisoned, cast out, or otherwise silenced, but more importantly, that their followers subsequently be mindbombed with Holocaust dogma. Benedict’s elder brother, Rabbi Arthur Schneier proclaimed as much at the Vatican last week:

“… how can we but revolt at Holocaust-denial? Victims of the Holocaust have not given us the right to forgive the perpetrators nor the Holocaust deniers … we must transmit “never again” through Holocaust education to future generations …”

Pope and Pharisees Preach More Holocaustolatry

A spokesperson for Yad Vashem has stated the same in response to Bishop Williamson’s apology:

“The millions of Jews that were murdered in the Holocaust and the survivors who were persecuted are not waiting for [Bp. Williamson’s] apology,” said Iris Rosenberg, spokeswoman of the Yad Vashem Holocaust museum in Jerusalem. “If he is looking to repent, he needs to admit that he was wrong in denying the truth. This is much more important to the people he claims to lead.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090226/ap_on_re_eu/eu_italy_holocaust_denial

What is important to Yad Vashem is not an apology from Bishop Williamson, but conforming the minds of his followers to “Holocaust” dogma, and Yad Vashem has many accomplices in Rome who have already made “Holocaust” dogma standard curriculum in Novus Ordo Catholic schools and seminaries. A true traditional Catholic alternative to their kosher schools and seminaries is not acceptable to them.

Have no doubt, as the Vatican currently stands, this is what “full communion” entails.

My prayers are with the SSPX leadership. I cannot imagine the pressure that’s upon them.

Footnote: Benedict stated, “violence committed against any one single human being is violence against all humanity. No man is an island, a well known poet once wrote.” That poet is Anglican priest, John Donne who was steeped in the Pantheism, Hermeticism, and Kabbalism of the Renaissance, but the concept Benedict draws on is actually founded in Babylonian Talmud, tractate Sanhedrin 37a and applies only to “Jews:” “Whosoever destroys a single soul of Israel, scripture imputes [guilt] to him as if he had destroyed a complete world.” Contrary to what Talmud suggests, this idea is not found in biblical Scripture.

Pope and Pharisees Preach More Holocaustolatry

February 18, 2009
Benedict XVI, Walter Kasper and Chief Priests of Holocaustolatry Feb. 12, 2009. Note Pharisees David Rosen and Abe Foxman who is a denier of the genocide of Armenian Christians in the first seats.

Raw audio of the kahal’s proceedings can be heard at this link:

http://audio.rabbis.org/pop.mp3

Below is the text of Rabbi Arthur Schneier’s address to the Pope. Benedict visited Rabbi Schneier’s synagogue on Passover eve last year, HERE. Note that Benedict’s elder brother Rabbi Schneier, in stark contrast to the founder of Christianity, preaches non-forgiveness. He also alludes to his non-biblical, Kabbalistic god, Metatron (“Shomer Yisrael” or “Guardian of Israel”) which is not found in Psalm 121 as he implies, but rather, throughout the rabbinic texts as Johannes Eisenmenger documented along with the rabbinic teaching that Christians (“Esau”) are watched over by Satan or “Sammael” (see: Eisenmenger, Traditions of the Jews). A fine basis for reconciliation, no? Rabbi Schneier predictably pushes more “Holocaust education,” “tolerance,” relations between Christians and “Jews,self worship, pious Zionism, blah, blah, blah …

Rabbi Arthur Schneier

Shalom, Your Holiness, Peace be unto you,

On the eve of Passover, during your historic visit to the United States, it was my privilege to welcome Your Holiness to Park East Synagogue in New York. The first papal visit to an American synagogue was another expression of your outreach to the Jewish community. Today, the Presidents Conference of Major American Jewish Organizations delegation enjoys your hospitality at a trying moment in Catholic-Jewish relations. We thank you for this encounter that will help bring healing and mutual understanding.

As a Holocaust survivor, these have been painful and difficult days when confronted with Holocaust-denial by no less than a bishop of Society of St. Pius X. 2009 marks the 70th anniversary of the outbreak of World War II, September 1, 1939. We both experienced the ravages of that war, death, suffering and devastation. The Shoah claimed the lives of six million Jewish men, women, and children including my own family in Auschwitz and Terezin. Your Holiness, we and others who have seen man’s inhumanity to man, how can we but revolt at Holocaust-denial? Victims of the Holocaust have not given us the right to forgive the perpetrators nor the Holocaust deniers. Thank you for understanding our pain and anguish and your firm statement expressing “unquestioned solidarity” with the Jewish people and condemning Holocaust denial.

In our autumn years, we must transmit “never again” through Holocaust education to future generations. Holocaust education can be a call to conscience and awaken us from our slumber of indifference to the threat of genocide in our own day.

Your Holiness, through the guidelines of Nostra Aetate, we have been able to heal the wounds of the past and effect reconciliation between the Church and the Jewish people. Your personal commitment and that of Pope John Paul II, of blessed memory, to “embrace the older brother” has given us further encouragement to build even closer ties between Catholics and Jews all over the world. Your Holiness, we thank you for repeatedly standing with us as we face the new scourge of Anti-Semitism, the desecration and burning of synagogues.

As Jews traveling in the desert carried not only the second tablets in the Ark but also the first broken tablets, we too carry with us memories of centuries of persecution, oppression and denigration, but we are not paralyzed by the past. We continue with faith in the Shomer Yisrael, Guardian of Israel, who shields and protects us at all times (Psalm 121). We have rebuilt our lives, and were privileged to see the reemergence of the State of Israel, the fulfillment of Ezekiel’s prophecy, “And I will put My spirit in you, and ye shall live, and I will place you in your own land; and ye shall know that I the LORD have spoken, and performed it, saith the LORD (Ezekiel 37:14).” The Promised Land awaits Your arrival.

Our relationship, based upon the solid foundation of Vatican II, can overcome periodic setbacks. We can emerge even stronger to cooperate with one another and to work together in confronting the enormous challenges facing our civilization. May God give you strength and long life to be the bridge-builder in pursuit of peace, inter-religious dialogue and tolerance. Oseh Shalom Bimromav Hu Yaaseh Shalom Aleinu: May He who made peace in Heaven, help us establish peace on Earth.

http://www.pesyn.org/news/article.cfm?id=100184

And the Pope’s response here:

Pope’s Speech to American Zionist Leaders, Feb. 12

Pope and Pharisees Preach More Holocaustolatry

February 18, 2009
Benedict XVI, Walter Kasper and Chief Priests of Holocaustolatry Feb. 12, 2009. Note Pharisees David Rosen and Abe Foxman who is a denier of the genocide of Armenian Christians in the first seats.

Raw audio of the kahal’s proceedings can be heard at this link:

http://audio.rabbis.org/pop.mp3

Below is the text of Rabbi Arthur Schneier’s address to the Pope. Benedict visited Rabbi Schneier’s synagogue on Passover eve last year, HERE. Note that Benedict’s elder brother Rabbi Schneier, in stark contrast to the founder of Christianity, preaches non-forgiveness. He also alludes to his non-biblical, Kabbalistic god, Metatron (“Shomer Yisrael” or “Guardian of Israel”) which is not found in Psalm 121 as he implies, but rather, throughout the rabbinic texts as Johannes Eisenmenger documented along with the rabbinic teaching that Christians (“Esau”) are watched over by Satan or “Sammael” (see: Eisenmenger, Traditions of the Jews). A fine basis for reconciliation, no? Rabbi Schneier predictably pushes more “Holocaust education,” “tolerance,” relations between Christians and “Jews,self worship, pious Zionism, blah, blah, blah …

Rabbi Arthur Schneier

Shalom, Your Holiness, Peace be unto you,

On the eve of Passover, during your historic visit to the United States, it was my privilege to welcome Your Holiness to Park East Synagogue in New York. The first papal visit to an American synagogue was another expression of your outreach to the Jewish community. Today, the Presidents Conference of Major American Jewish Organizations delegation enjoys your hospitality at a trying moment in Catholic-Jewish relations. We thank you for this encounter that will help bring healing and mutual understanding.

As a Holocaust survivor, these have been painful and difficult days when confronted with Holocaust-denial by no less than a bishop of Society of St. Pius X. 2009 marks the 70th anniversary of the outbreak of World War II, September 1, 1939. We both experienced the ravages of that war, death, suffering and devastation. The Shoah claimed the lives of six million Jewish men, women, and children including my own family in Auschwitz and Terezin. Your Holiness, we and others who have seen man’s inhumanity to man, how can we but revolt at Holocaust-denial? Victims of the Holocaust have not given us the right to forgive the perpetrators nor the Holocaust deniers. Thank you for understanding our pain and anguish and your firm statement expressing “unquestioned solidarity” with the Jewish people and condemning Holocaust denial.

In our autumn years, we must transmit “never again” through Holocaust education to future generations. Holocaust education can be a call to conscience and awaken us from our slumber of indifference to the threat of genocide in our own day.

Your Holiness, through the guidelines of Nostra Aetate, we have been able to heal the wounds of the past and effect reconciliation between the Church and the Jewish people. Your personal commitment and that of Pope John Paul II, of blessed memory, to “embrace the older brother” has given us further encouragement to build even closer ties between Catholics and Jews all over the world. Your Holiness, we thank you for repeatedly standing with us as we face the new scourge of Anti-Semitism, the desecration and burning of synagogues.

As Jews traveling in the desert carried not only the second tablets in the Ark but also the first broken tablets, we too carry with us memories of centuries of persecution, oppression and denigration, but we are not paralyzed by the past. We continue with faith in the Shomer Yisrael, Guardian of Israel, who shields and protects us at all times (Psalm 121). We have rebuilt our lives, and were privileged to see the reemergence of the State of Israel, the fulfillment of Ezekiel’s prophecy, “And I will put My spirit in you, and ye shall live, and I will place you in your own land; and ye shall know that I the LORD have spoken, and performed it, saith the LORD (Ezekiel 37:14).” The Promised Land awaits Your arrival.

Our relationship, based upon the solid foundation of Vatican II, can overcome periodic setbacks. We can emerge even stronger to cooperate with one another and to work together in confronting the enormous challenges facing our civilization. May God give you strength and long life to be the bridge-builder in pursuit of peace, inter-religious dialogue and tolerance. Oseh Shalom Bimromav Hu Yaaseh Shalom Aleinu: May He who made peace in Heaven, help us establish peace on Earth.

http://www.pesyn.org/news/article.cfm?id=100184

And the Pope’s response here:

Pope’s Speech to American Zionist Leaders, Feb. 12

Pope and Pharisees Preach More Holocaustolatry

February 18, 2009
Benedict XVI, Walter Kasper and Chief Priests of Holocaustolatry Feb. 12, 2009. Note Pharisees David Rosen and Abe Foxman who is a denier of the genocide of Armenian Christians in the first seats.

Raw audio of the kahal’s proceedings can be heard at this link:

http://audio.rabbis.org/pop.mp3

Below is the text of Rabbi Arthur Schneier’s address to the Pope. Benedict visited Rabbi Schneier’s synagogue on Passover eve last year, HERE. Note that Benedict’s elder brother Rabbi Schneier, in stark contrast to the founder of Christianity, preaches non-forgiveness. He also alludes to his non-biblical, Kabbalistic god, Metatron (“Shomer Yisrael” or “Guardian of Israel”) which is not found in Psalm 121 as he implies, but rather, throughout the rabbinic texts as Johannes Eisenmenger documented along with the rabbinic teaching that Christians (“Esau”) are watched over by Satan or “Sammael” (see: Eisenmenger, Traditions of the Jews). A fine basis for reconciliation, no? Rabbi Schneier predictably pushes more “Holocaust education,” “tolerance,” relations between Christians and “Jews,self worship, pious Zionism, blah, blah, blah …

Rabbi Arthur Schneier

Shalom, Your Holiness, Peace be unto you,

On the eve of Passover, during your historic visit to the United States, it was my privilege to welcome Your Holiness to Park East Synagogue in New York. The first papal visit to an American synagogue was another expression of your outreach to the Jewish community. Today, the Presidents Conference of Major American Jewish Organizations delegation enjoys your hospitality at a trying moment in Catholic-Jewish relations. We thank you for this encounter that will help bring healing and mutual understanding.

As a Holocaust survivor, these have been painful and difficult days when confronted with Holocaust-denial by no less than a bishop of Society of St. Pius X. 2009 marks the 70th anniversary of the outbreak of World War II, September 1, 1939. We both experienced the ravages of that war, death, suffering and devastation. The Shoah claimed the lives of six million Jewish men, women, and children including my own family in Auschwitz and Terezin. Your Holiness, we and others who have seen man’s inhumanity to man, how can we but revolt at Holocaust-denial? Victims of the Holocaust have not given us the right to forgive the perpetrators nor the Holocaust deniers. Thank you for understanding our pain and anguish and your firm statement expressing “unquestioned solidarity” with the Jewish people and condemning Holocaust denial.

In our autumn years, we must transmit “never again” through Holocaust education to future generations. Holocaust education can be a call to conscience and awaken us from our slumber of indifference to the threat of genocide in our own day.

Your Holiness, through the guidelines of Nostra Aetate, we have been able to heal the wounds of the past and effect reconciliation between the Church and the Jewish people. Your personal commitment and that of Pope John Paul II, of blessed memory, to “embrace the older brother” has given us further encouragement to build even closer ties between Catholics and Jews all over the world. Your Holiness, we thank you for repeatedly standing with us as we face the new scourge of Anti-Semitism, the desecration and burning of synagogues.

As Jews traveling in the desert carried not only the second tablets in the Ark but also the first broken tablets, we too carry with us memories of centuries of persecution, oppression and denigration, but we are not paralyzed by the past. We continue with faith in the Shomer Yisrael, Guardian of Israel, who shields and protects us at all times (Psalm 121). We have rebuilt our lives, and were privileged to see the reemergence of the State of Israel, the fulfillment of Ezekiel’s prophecy, “And I will put My spirit in you, and ye shall live, and I will place you in your own land; and ye shall know that I the LORD have spoken, and performed it, saith the LORD (Ezekiel 37:14).” The Promised Land awaits Your arrival.

Our relationship, based upon the solid foundation of Vatican II, can overcome periodic setbacks. We can emerge even stronger to cooperate with one another and to work together in confronting the enormous challenges facing our civilization. May God give you strength and long life to be the bridge-builder in pursuit of peace, inter-religious dialogue and tolerance. Oseh Shalom Bimromav Hu Yaaseh Shalom Aleinu: May He who made peace in Heaven, help us establish peace on Earth.

http://www.pesyn.org/news/article.cfm?id=100184

And the Pope’s response here:

Pope’s Speech to American Zionist Leaders, Feb. 12

Important 2005 Article on Benedict and the Rabbis

May 29, 2008

As it turns out, this 2005 New York Sun article which a reader called attention to was prophetic. It foretold of Benedict’s 2008 Good Friday prayer for the Jews that he tacked onto the 1962 Missal. According to former World Jewish Congress official and Edgar Bronfman crony, Rabbi Israel Singer, Benedict had told him he would make such a change in 1993 during a visit to his Vatican apartment:

In 1993 … Rabbi Singer … visited Cardinal Ratzinger at home … Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Singer said, listened carefully to concerns about aspects of the Catholic liturgy, “and he said he was going to change that liturgy which was unacceptable because it causes anti-Semitism.”

Rabbi Singer, a man who Norman Finkelstein has fittingly called a “repellent sewer rat,” was recently kicked out of the WJC. As it turns out, he’s too corrupt even for the Judaic mafia. How interesting that such a character would influence the Catholic liturgy. More on Rabbi Singer:

The Vatican Mafia

There’s No Racket Like the Shoah Racket

Lustiger’s NY Yeshiva Tour, Endorsement of Chabad Lubavitch as Religious Model

Cardinal Jean-Pierre Ricard of Ecclesia Dei Commission Studying Talmud at NY Yeshiva

There are many other points of interest in this article. Searches of this blog for the rabbis mentioned below will turn up much information.

How Future Pope Won the Respect of Jewish Leaders

By MEGHAN CLYNE, Staff Reporter of the Sun
April 22, 2005

In the days since Pope Benedict XVI’s election, many critics have tarred him as an intolerant ideologue, insensitive to people of other faiths. Several New York Jewish leaders, however, while recounting their personal experiences with Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, described the future pope as a gentle, humble, learned man, a brilliant theological mind, and a devoted ecclesiastical leader in whom Jews will find an important ally.

The chairman of the World Jewish Congress, Rabbi Israel Singer, remembered a trip to Rome in which he visited the then-cardinal’s personal apartment, which he said illustrated Benedict’s personality.

In 1993, Rabbi Singer said, he was at the Vatican in anticipation of Pope John Paul II’s historic declaration that the Holy See would officially recognize and maintain diplomatic relations with the state of Israel. On the eve of the announcement, Rabbi Singer said, he visited Cardinal Ratzinger at home to discuss the theological implications of the decision, of which the cardinal was a staunch supporter.

Although his residence was nestled amidst the elaborate Baroque architecture of the Vatican, Rabbi Singer said, the interior of the cardinal’s quarters was extraordinarily spare, with a German simplicity in its appointments and furnishings.

“You got the impression you were in the home of a very, very modest person,” Rabbi Singer said. “All you saw in that apartment were books – books, and books, and books, all with yellow slips with markings on them, which showed these books had all been read.”

The expansiveness of the future pope’s personal library, and the orderliness with which it was arranged, reflected the breadth, depth, and discipline of the pontiff’s intellect, Rabbi Singer said.

“He’s very fair … very thoughtful, very deep-thinking,” Rabbi Singer said of Benedict. Contrary to depictions of him as a fierce, unreflective dogmatist, the pontiff “doesn’t come to a conclusion until he’s solved all the problems and questions,” Rabbi Singer said.

Benedict’s contemplative sensitivity, the New York rabbi added, manifested itself in his responsiveness to Jewish leaders’ anxieties. Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Singer said, listened carefully to concerns about aspects of the Catholic liturgy, “and he said he was going to change that liturgy which was unacceptable because it causes anti-Semitism.”

On another occasion, Rabbi Singer said, he discussed a Jewish-Catholic relief operation in Argentina with the cardinal, wondering whether – given that it was unusual for the church to suggest such collaboration with Jews – the undertaking was theologically sound.

“He listened carefully,” Rabbi Singer said, “and then said, ‘This is a very important task, bless you.’ “

“He smiled, and he said he felt this is what religion should be known for – that this is the most important aspect of the dialogue,” Rabbi Singer added.

Sometimes, Benedict’s dialogue with Jews has been conducted quietly, not in his capacity as the guardian of Catholic orthodoxy, but as a private citizen and inquisitive theologian.

A theology professor at Bard College, Rabbi Jacob Neusner, has been a regular correspondent with Benedict for the past 15 years.

Rabbi Neusner is the author of several books on Jewish theology, including translations into English of rabbinic texts. While working on a volume about the historical Jesus in 1989, he said, he came across some of Cardinal Ratzinger’s writings on the subject. Rabbi Neusner sent him a letter praising his work, and the cardinal’s response initiated a continuing communication on matters of theological scholarship.

In the course of their epistolary dialogue, Rabbi Neusner said, Cardinal Ratzinger proved himself “a very fine scholar, very smart, and very sensitive.”

When Rabbi Neusner wrote “A Rabbi Talks With Jesus” in 1994 – a book in which Rabbi Neusner says that, had he been present for the Sermon on the Mount, he would not have followed Jesus – Cardinal Ratzinger, whose English is described as excellent, sent him a blurb for the jacket.

Despite its rejection of Christian teachings, Benedict wrote of Rabbi Neusner’s work: “The absolute honesty, the precision of analysis, the union of respect for the other party with carefully grounded loyalty to one’s own position characterize the book and make it a challenge especially to Christians, who will have to ponder the analysis of the conflict between Moses and Jesus.”

Rabbi Neusner and several other Jewish leaders said Benedict’s unflinching conviction in his own faith was hardly a liability, but was precisely what made him such a valuable interlocutor – because he could appreciate Jewish leaders’ staunch belief in the truth of their own religion.

The basis of interfaith dialogue with Benedict, they said, was mutual respect and a celebration of common convictions, rather than a push to evangelize or demand alterations to doctrine. That attitude, the head of inter-religious affairs for the American Jewish Committee, Rabbi David Rosen, said, would “develop a very healthy, productive relationship.”

“I think that generally within the Jewish community, they’ll recognize that in Pope Benedict XVI we have a friend,” Rabbi Rosen said by phone from Israel yesterday.

Indeed, much of the perception of Benedict as intolerant toward other faiths was the result of a misinterpretation of his 2000 encyclical “Dominus Iesus,” the director of interfaith affairs at the Anti-Defamation League, Rabbi Gary Bretton-Granatoor, said. In the encyclical, Cardinal Ratzinger reasserted the fundamental church doctrine that salvation is attainable only through Roman Catholicism.

Of the document, Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor said: “I don’t believe it really has anything to do with his understanding of Jews and Judaism.”

“Dominus Iesus” was directed more at the problems of orthodoxy within Christendom, including deviations by Protestant sects, Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor said. It was also issued as a directive to errant factions within the Catholic Church, particularly those embracing syncretism – the attempt to blend doctrine with local customs in places where Catholicism is growing.

The encyclical, Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor said, should not be read as hostility toward Jews on Benedict’s part. “In his mind … Judaism exists on an entirely different plane than any other religion,” he said.

And because Cardinal Ratzinger, as head of the church’s Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith, helped provide the theological underpinnings of the conciliatory overtures to Judaism during John Paul II’s papacy, there was no reason to suspect any ill will toward Jews on Benedict’s part, the director of the Anti-Defamation League, Abraham Foxman, said. “I’m convinced he will carry on that tradition,” Mr. Foxman said.

Indeed, further indications that Benedict intends to continue John Paul’s legacy emerged from Rome yesterday, where the new pontiff reconfirmed all of the heads of the Vatican Curia who had served under his predecessor, the Daily Telegraph reported.

If Benedict’s ecclesiastical past boded well for the church’s future relations with Judaism, at first glance his personal history – particularly his coerced membership in the Hitler Youth as a teenager in Germany – might not. There seems to be a consensus, however, that Benedict’s biography is not cause for concern among the Jewish community.

To the contrary, in the view of the Park East Synagogue’s Rabbi Arthur Schneier, “Because Benedict grew up in a country that inflicted tyranny,” the rabbi said, “he has a greater appreciation of freedom and liberty.”

Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor, too, saw some advantage in Benedict being a German. “It’s not like I have to explain anti-Semitism to somebody who’s never experienced it,” he said.

Indeed, a founding member of the Interfaith Theological Forum of the Pope John Paul II Center at Washington, Rabbi Leon Klenicki, said Benedict expressed great sensitivity to Jewish theological questions arising from the Holocaust.

Rabbi Klenicki, who met several times with Cardinal Ratzinger, recounted a discussion with the prelate on the question: “How could God be silent when 1 million children went to the gas chambers?” That inquiry, Rabbi Klenicki said, presents a “very serious problem” in the Jewish community, “and not so much in the Christian community.” Yet Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Klenicki said, “listened with total attention and fervor, realizing the pain of what I was talking about.”

In Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Klenicki said, he found an empathetic man who seeks and appreciates the presence of God in every person, regardless of creed. “He was very attentive … listening to you with all his heart,” he said.

That thoughtful aspect of Benedict would be well-received by Jews, Rabbi Neusner said, because of the honor Judaism accords serious religious study. “I think the people will really appreciate him, because they appreciate intellect … and they honor learning,” he said.

Rabbi Neusner congratulated Benedict on his new post. “I wrote him a letter saying that, as he knows … Benedict means ‘blessed’ – and that’s my hope for his pontificate,” Rabbi Neusner said. “Somewhere within a few months, there’ll be a very gracious reply,” the rabbi predicted.

http://www.nysun.com/foreign/how-future-pope-won-the-respect-of-jewish-leaders/12646/

Important 2005 Article on Benedict and the Rabbis

May 29, 2008

As it turns out, this 2005 New York Sun article which a reader called attention to was prophetic. It foretold of Benedict’s 2008 Good Friday prayer for the Jews that he tacked onto the 1962 Missal. According to former World Jewish Congress official and Edgar Bronfman crony, Rabbi Israel Singer, Benedict had told him he would make such a change in 1993 during a visit to his Vatican apartment:

In 1993 … Rabbi Singer … visited Cardinal Ratzinger at home … Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Singer said, listened carefully to concerns about aspects of the Catholic liturgy, “and he said he was going to change that liturgy which was unacceptable because it causes anti-Semitism.”

Rabbi Singer, a man who Norman Finkelstein has fittingly called a “repellent sewer rat,” was recently kicked out of the WJC. As it turns out, he’s too corrupt even for the Judaic mafia. How interesting that such a character would influence the Catholic liturgy. More on Rabbi Singer:

The Vatican Mafia

There’s No Racket Like the Shoah Racket

Lustiger’s NY Yeshiva Tour, Endorsement of Chabad Lubavitch as Religious Model

Cardinal Jean-Pierre Ricard of Ecclesia Dei Commission Studying Talmud at NY Yeshiva

There are many other points of interest in this article. Searches of this blog for the rabbis mentioned below will turn up much information.

How Future Pope Won the Respect of Jewish Leaders

By MEGHAN CLYNE, Staff Reporter of the Sun
April 22, 2005

In the days since Pope Benedict XVI’s election, many critics have tarred him as an intolerant ideologue, insensitive to people of other faiths. Several New York Jewish leaders, however, while recounting their personal experiences with Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, described the future pope as a gentle, humble, learned man, a brilliant theological mind, and a devoted ecclesiastical leader in whom Jews will find an important ally.

The chairman of the World Jewish Congress, Rabbi Israel Singer, remembered a trip to Rome in which he visited the then-cardinal’s personal apartment, which he said illustrated Benedict’s personality.

In 1993, Rabbi Singer said, he was at the Vatican in anticipation of Pope John Paul II’s historic declaration that the Holy See would officially recognize and maintain diplomatic relations with the state of Israel. On the eve of the announcement, Rabbi Singer said, he visited Cardinal Ratzinger at home to discuss the theological implications of the decision, of which the cardinal was a staunch supporter.

Although his residence was nestled amidst the elaborate Baroque architecture of the Vatican, Rabbi Singer said, the interior of the cardinal’s quarters was extraordinarily spare, with a German simplicity in its appointments and furnishings.

“You got the impression you were in the home of a very, very modest person,” Rabbi Singer said. “All you saw in that apartment were books – books, and books, and books, all with yellow slips with markings on them, which showed these books had all been read.”

The expansiveness of the future pope’s personal library, and the orderliness with which it was arranged, reflected the breadth, depth, and discipline of the pontiff’s intellect, Rabbi Singer said.

“He’s very fair … very thoughtful, very deep-thinking,” Rabbi Singer said of Benedict. Contrary to depictions of him as a fierce, unreflective dogmatist, the pontiff “doesn’t come to a conclusion until he’s solved all the problems and questions,” Rabbi Singer said.

Benedict’s contemplative sensitivity, the New York rabbi added, manifested itself in his responsiveness to Jewish leaders’ anxieties. Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Singer said, listened carefully to concerns about aspects of the Catholic liturgy, “and he said he was going to change that liturgy which was unacceptable because it causes anti-Semitism.”

On another occasion, Rabbi Singer said, he discussed a Jewish-Catholic relief operation in Argentina with the cardinal, wondering whether – given that it was unusual for the church to suggest such collaboration with Jews – the undertaking was theologically sound.

“He listened carefully,” Rabbi Singer said, “and then said, ‘This is a very important task, bless you.’ “

“He smiled, and he said he felt this is what religion should be known for – that this is the most important aspect of the dialogue,” Rabbi Singer added.

Sometimes, Benedict’s dialogue with Jews has been conducted quietly, not in his capacity as the guardian of Catholic orthodoxy, but as a private citizen and inquisitive theologian.

A theology professor at Bard College, Rabbi Jacob Neusner, has been a regular correspondent with Benedict for the past 15 years.

Rabbi Neusner is the author of several books on Jewish theology, including translations into English of rabbinic texts. While working on a volume about the historical Jesus in 1989, he said, he came across some of Cardinal Ratzinger’s writings on the subject. Rabbi Neusner sent him a letter praising his work, and the cardinal’s response initiated a continuing communication on matters of theological scholarship.

In the course of their epistolary dialogue, Rabbi Neusner said, Cardinal Ratzinger proved himself “a very fine scholar, very smart, and very sensitive.”

When Rabbi Neusner wrote “A Rabbi Talks With Jesus” in 1994 – a book in which Rabbi Neusner says that, had he been present for the Sermon on the Mount, he would not have followed Jesus – Cardinal Ratzinger, whose English is described as excellent, sent him a blurb for the jacket.

Despite its rejection of Christian teachings, Benedict wrote of Rabbi Neusner’s work: “The absolute honesty, the precision of analysis, the union of respect for the other party with carefully grounded loyalty to one’s own position characterize the book and make it a challenge especially to Christians, who will have to ponder the analysis of the conflict between Moses and Jesus.”

Rabbi Neusner and several other Jewish leaders said Benedict’s unflinching conviction in his own faith was hardly a liability, but was precisely what made him such a valuable interlocutor – because he could appreciate Jewish leaders’ staunch belief in the truth of their own religion.

The basis of interfaith dialogue with Benedict, they said, was mutual respect and a celebration of common convictions, rather than a push to evangelize or demand alterations to doctrine. That attitude, the head of inter-religious affairs for the American Jewish Committee, Rabbi David Rosen, said, would “develop a very healthy, productive relationship.”

“I think that generally within the Jewish community, they’ll recognize that in Pope Benedict XVI we have a friend,” Rabbi Rosen said by phone from Israel yesterday.

Indeed, much of the perception of Benedict as intolerant toward other faiths was the result of a misinterpretation of his 2000 encyclical “Dominus Iesus,” the director of interfaith affairs at the Anti-Defamation League, Rabbi Gary Bretton-Granatoor, said. In the encyclical, Cardinal Ratzinger reasserted the fundamental church doctrine that salvation is attainable only through Roman Catholicism.

Of the document, Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor said: “I don’t believe it really has anything to do with his understanding of Jews and Judaism.”

“Dominus Iesus” was directed more at the problems of orthodoxy within Christendom, including deviations by Protestant sects, Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor said. It was also issued as a directive to errant factions within the Catholic Church, particularly those embracing syncretism – the attempt to blend doctrine with local customs in places where Catholicism is growing.

The encyclical, Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor said, should not be read as hostility toward Jews on Benedict’s part. “In his mind … Judaism exists on an entirely different plane than any other religion,” he said.

And because Cardinal Ratzinger, as head of the church’s Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith, helped provide the theological underpinnings of the conciliatory overtures to Judaism during John Paul II’s papacy, there was no reason to suspect any ill will toward Jews on Benedict’s part, the director of the Anti-Defamation League, Abraham Foxman, said. “I’m convinced he will carry on that tradition,” Mr. Foxman said.

Indeed, further indications that Benedict intends to continue John Paul’s legacy emerged from Rome yesterday, where the new pontiff reconfirmed all of the heads of the Vatican Curia who had served under his predecessor, the Daily Telegraph reported.

If Benedict’s ecclesiastical past boded well for the church’s future relations with Judaism, at first glance his personal history – particularly his coerced membership in the Hitler Youth as a teenager in Germany – might not. There seems to be a consensus, however, that Benedict’s biography is not cause for concern among the Jewish community.

To the contrary, in the view of the Park East Synagogue’s Rabbi Arthur Schneier, “Because Benedict grew up in a country that inflicted tyranny,” the rabbi said, “he has a greater appreciation of freedom and liberty.”

Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor, too, saw some advantage in Benedict being a German. “It’s not like I have to explain anti-Semitism to somebody who’s never experienced it,” he said.

Indeed, a founding member of the Interfaith Theological Forum of the Pope John Paul II Center at Washington, Rabbi Leon Klenicki, said Benedict expressed great sensitivity to Jewish theological questions arising from the Holocaust.

Rabbi Klenicki, who met several times with Cardinal Ratzinger, recounted a discussion with the prelate on the question: “How could God be silent when 1 million children went to the gas chambers?” That inquiry, Rabbi Klenicki said, presents a “very serious problem” in the Jewish community, “and not so much in the Christian community.” Yet Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Klenicki said, “listened with total attention and fervor, realizing the pain of what I was talking about.”

In Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Klenicki said, he found an empathetic man who seeks and appreciates the presence of God in every person, regardless of creed. “He was very attentive … listening to you with all his heart,” he said.

That thoughtful aspect of Benedict would be well-received by Jews, Rabbi Neusner said, because of the honor Judaism accords serious religious study. “I think the people will really appreciate him, because they appreciate intellect … and they honor learning,” he said.

Rabbi Neusner congratulated Benedict on his new post. “I wrote him a letter saying that, as he knows … Benedict means ‘blessed’ – and that’s my hope for his pontificate,” Rabbi Neusner said. “Somewhere within a few months, there’ll be a very gracious reply,” the rabbi predicted.

http://www.nysun.com/foreign/how-future-pope-won-the-respect-of-jewish-leaders/12646/

Observations on Benedict XVI’s Passover Eve Synagogue Visit

April 19, 2008

Witness video of Benedict’s Passover eve synagogue visit in its entirety at this link:

http://wcbstv.com/topstories/Pope.Benedict.NYC.2.703533.html

What can we observe here that has not already been pointed out?

There is a tremendous amount of effort being devoted towards propping up the idea that these people who today call themselves “Jews” are actual descendants of the ancient Israelites. Maintaining this illusion is critical to the entire charade.

Likewise there’s a great deal of effort made to associate Jesus with the people who today call themselves “Jews” and the anti-Biblical religion of Orthodox Judaism. Benedict stated, “I find it moving to recall that Jesus, as a young boy, heard the words of Scripture and prayed in a place such as this [NY synagogue].” This statement is false and ridiculous, but it does create an association between Jesus and the Talmudic synagogues of today, which is its most likely intended purpose.

The “brothers” theme was reinforced by the rabbi. This is a clear allusion to Jacob and Esau who were at conflict in the Old Testament. There is a Kabbalistic gnosis having to do with “Jacob” being reconciled with “Esau” prior to the Judaic “redemption.” This gnosis stems from the occult tradition related to the conjunction of opposites. The Vatican’s relentless drive towards “reconciliation” between Christians and Orthodox Judaic followers of the Talmud and Kabbalah is harmonious with this Kabbalistic tradition and has nothing to do with Christian, Biblical tradition. St. Paul spoke of reconciliation between Jews and Gentiles, but that it could only be through faith in Jesus Christ. This is beside the fact that we can’t know who the true descendants of Abraham, Issac and Jacob are. To apply St. Paul’s words regarding reconciliation to these Khazars and Sephardim who deny Christ and adhere to Talmud and Kabbalah is as diabolical as it is foolish.

The gifts that are exchanged at these meetings between the popes and Judaic leaders invariably are Judaic gifts. There is a lot to be read into this in terms of direction and proportion in their “dialogue.” The synagogue gave Benedict a silver Seder plate, a Passover haggadah and matzo, and he gave them a medieval Judaic codex.

The Judaic codex which Benedict gave the synagogue as a gift was a text from the medieval rabbinic codifier, Jacob ben Asher the Ba’al ha-Turim (Master of the Pillars). Jacob ben Asher is best known for his Rimzei Ba’al ha-Turim, a work of gematria, which is to say, methods for finding “hidden teachings” in Biblical texts which, consequently, nullify the written meaning.

These poor, deluded people could benefit so much more from a copy of the New Testament than the satanic gematria of Jacob ben Asher, but why would Benedict bring the Gospel to a synagogue on the anniversary of Christ’s execution? Apparently, Benedict visited these people in their synagogue on this day only to celebrate with them in their delusional ethnic conceit, praise them for their anti-Biblical traditions, and to validate those same ethnic delusions and anti-Biblical traditions in the eyes of Christians. The only preaching I heard had to do with the anti-Biblical doctrine, “Tikkun Olam” and it came from the rabbi.

Speaking of gematria, The NY Times has gone to great lengths to document that the visit was 22 minutes long. Those who understand the Kabbalistic obsession with numbers will recognize the significance here:

Pope Benedict XVI paid a 22-minute visit to the Park East Synagogue — the first papal trip to a United States synagogue — on Friday afternoon …

The pope entered the synagogue at 5:16 p.m. …

The pope exited the synagogue at 5:38 p.m., ending a visit of just over 20 minutes. (Pope Makes First Visit to a U.S. Synagogue,” Sewell Chan, The New York Times, April 19, 2008) http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/04/18/a-key-moment-in-benedicts-relationship-with-the-jews/?hp

Benedict could well have become the most treacherous “vicar of Christ” in history after these past two days. Meanwhile, “traditionalists” are focused on complaining about the music at his baseball stadium Mass …

See also:

http://revisionistreview.blogspot.com/2008/04/at-synagogue-pope-tells-two-lies-in-two.html

Observations on Benedict XVI’s Passover Eve Synagogue Visit

April 19, 2008

Witness video of Benedict’s Passover eve synagogue visit in its entirety at this link:

http://wcbstv.com/topstories/Pope.Benedict.NYC.2.703533.html

What can we observe here that has not already been pointed out?

There is a tremendous amount of effort being devoted towards propping up the idea that these people who today call themselves “Jews” are actual descendants of the ancient Israelites. Maintaining this illusion is critical to the entire charade.

Likewise there’s a great deal of effort made to associate Jesus with the people who today call themselves “Jews” and the anti-Biblical religion of Orthodox Judaism. Benedict stated, “I find it moving to recall that Jesus, as a young boy, heard the words of Scripture and prayed in a place such as this [NY synagogue].” This statement is false and ridiculous, but it does create an association between Jesus and the Talmudic synagogues of today, which is its most likely intended purpose.

The “brothers” theme was reinforced by the rabbi. This is a clear allusion to Jacob and Esau who were at conflict in the Old Testament. There is a Kabbalistic gnosis having to do with “Jacob” being reconciled with “Esau” prior to the Judaic “redemption.” This gnosis stems from the occult tradition related to the conjunction of opposites. The Vatican’s relentless drive towards “reconciliation” between Christians and Orthodox Judaic followers of the Talmud and Kabbalah is harmonious with this Kabbalistic tradition and has nothing to do with Christian, Biblical tradition. St. Paul spoke of reconciliation between Jews and Gentiles, but that it could only be through faith in Jesus Christ. This is beside the fact that we can’t know who the true descendants of Abraham, Issac and Jacob are. To apply St. Paul’s words regarding reconciliation to these Khazars and Sephardim who deny Christ and adhere to Talmud and Kabbalah is as diabolical as it is foolish.

The gifts that are exchanged at these meetings between the popes and Judaic leaders invariably are Judaic gifts. There is a lot to be read into this in terms of direction and proportion in their “dialogue.” The synagogue gave Benedict a silver Seder plate, a Passover haggadah and matzo, and he gave them a medieval Judaic codex.

The Judaic codex which Benedict gave the synagogue as a gift was a text from the medieval rabbinic codifier, Jacob ben Asher the Ba’al ha-Turim (Master of the Pillars). Jacob ben Asher is best known for his Rimzei Ba’al ha-Turim, a work of gematria, which is to say, methods for finding “hidden teachings” in Biblical texts which, consequently, nullify the written meaning.

These poor, deluded people could benefit so much more from a copy of the New Testament than the satanic gematria of Jacob ben Asher, but why would Benedict bring the Gospel to a synagogue on the anniversary of Christ’s execution? Apparently, Benedict visited these people in their synagogue on this day only to celebrate with them in their delusional ethnic conceit, praise them for their anti-Biblical traditions, and to validate those same ethnic delusions and anti-Biblical traditions in the eyes of Christians. The only preaching I heard had to do with the anti-Biblical doctrine, “Tikkun Olam” and it came from the rabbi.

Speaking of gematria, The NY Times has gone to great lengths to document that the visit was 22 minutes long. Those who understand the Kabbalistic obsession with numbers will recognize the significance here:

Pope Benedict XVI paid a 22-minute visit to the Park East Synagogue — the first papal trip to a United States synagogue — on Friday afternoon …

The pope entered the synagogue at 5:16 p.m. …

The pope exited the synagogue at 5:38 p.m., ending a visit of just over 20 minutes. (Pope Makes First Visit to a U.S. Synagogue,” Sewell Chan, The New York Times, April 19, 2008) http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/04/18/a-key-moment-in-benedicts-relationship-with-the-jews/?hp

Benedict could well have become the most treacherous “vicar of Christ” in history after these past two days. Meanwhile, “traditionalists” are focused on complaining about the music at his baseball stadium Mass …

See also:

http://revisionistreview.blogspot.com/2008/04/at-synagogue-pope-tells-two-lies-in-two.html