Archive for the ‘OPus Dei’ Category

Israeli Lawmaker Destroys "Abominable" New Testament as "Christians" United for "Israel" Meet in Washington

July 17, 2012

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Vatican ‘Jew’ Enforces Vatican II

May 4, 2012
This should be read in tandem with: Opus Pharisaei

“One must take this occasion to express the deep hope that leniency will be denied” to anyone who does not accept the [Second Vatican] council’s teaching and “that there will be no being content with fake, quasi-adhesions accompanied by evident verbal and mental reservations to the teaching of the Second Vatican Council in general and to ‘Nostra Aetate’ in particular.”

Last year we noted that the Israeli tribalist Fr. David Jaeger was installed as a prelate auditor of the Roman Rota, the highest court of the Catholic Church. We noted Jaeger’s candid admission that at the Vatican court he would be as loyal to the people of Counterfeit Israel and the nation of Counterfeit Israel as any other Israeli working for a supranational body, mentioning the interesting example of Israelis working at the International Monetary Fund as a reference as to how his tribal loyalty would manifest itself as he works at the Vatican’s highest court. We appreciate the candor because it reveals the farce of the court historian portrayal of the court ‘Jew’ as a turncoat and lays bare the previously well hidden reality.

Jaeger was a key figure in the Vatican’s official recognition of Counterfeit Israel of 1993, a typically raw deal where the gangster state was afforded undeserved credibility by the venerable 2000 year-old Church institution and Catholics got nothing except spat upon. This can only last so long, however. Whatever residual credibility the Vatican may be coasting on presently that was not lost in the pedophilia scandal is being squandered entirely in the massive Zionist vortex of consumption.

Jaeger’s suggestion that without Vatican II and Nostra Aetate ‘The Jews’ are in danger of annihilation by violent mobs of ‘non-Jews’ fueled by Christian theological hatred of ‘Jews’ is itself a form of hatred of the historical Church and the Christian people; a blood libel. Always the double standard. And Jaeger’s appeals to victimhood as he sits at the head of the Vatican’s highest court inciting an inquisition against Catholics strains chutzpah beyond most previous wild examples.

Jeager’s work, like that of the misnamed ‘Opus Dei,’ is the relativisation away of the the Church’s past authoritative teachings and making an absolute out of a  document lobbied for by haters of the Church and the Gospel--Jules Isaac, B’nai B’rith, AJC, WJC, etc., etc,–and co-written by a rabbi who admitted that he wanted to attack Christians’ souls.

Church should not accept members who deny Vatican II, official says

ROME (CNS) — The Second Vatican Council’s teaching, particularly on Judaism and other religions, is rooted in traditional Christian theology and the Bible, and the Catholic Church should not offer concessions to those who do not accept its teaching, said an Israeli-born Franciscan who serves as a judge on a top Vatican court.

Msgr. David Jaeger, a judge at the Roman Rota, defined as worrying a tendency, “here and there in Catholicism, to look leniently upon stray groups that are marginal but well-publicized who denounce the doctrine of the council, including the declaration ‘Nostra Aetate'” on the relationship of the church to non-Christian religions.

Msgr. Jaeger, who grew up in a Jewish family, spoke about “Nostra Aetate” during a conference on the Second Vatican Council at Rome’s Opus Dei-run Holy Cross University May 3-4.

“While often presented as if it were absolutely new,” he said, the teaching of “Nostra Aetate” “perfectly corresponds to the most ancient intuitions of Christian theology” when it affirms “there can be, and in particular cases, are elements of truth and holiness” in other religions, he said. In addition, the document emphasized that Judaism [the religion which teaches Jesus got what he deserved at Calvary] has a special status, which “already was extensively explained by St. Paul, particularly in the Epistle to the Romans” [a ridiculous falsehood. St. Paul addresses a remnant of Israelites, not the Pharisaic religion of Judaism that revels in responsibility for Jesus’ execution].

The council’s document explained the church’s “doctrine on Judaism, the only religion which, while not knowing Christ, has its origins in biblical revelation, which is why the church does not regard it simply as a ‘non-Christian religion,’ but ascribes to it a unique status,” Msgr. Jaeger said [falsely. Judaism has its origins in the Pharisees and the Mishnah and their making the Bible of no effect].

While recognizing the unique and special relationship between God and the Jewish people, he said, the council did not say say that Judaism was a “parallel path to salvation” and it did not deny that somehow, in the end, all salvation would be accomplished through Christ.

Obviously motivated by the horrors of the Holocaust, but also by centuries of injustices and persecution of Jews “by those who called themselves Christians and believed they therefore could justify their brutality, the declaration took care to severely condemn such conduct and to highlight the complete illegitimacy of supporting it with any reference to Christianity,” he said.

“The proof of Nostra Aetate’s effectiveness is that it seems strange to have to say it today,” the monsignor said.

However, he said, “One must take this occasion to express the deep hope that leniency will be denied” to anyone who does not accept the council’s teaching and “that there will be no being content with fake, quasi-adhesions accompanied by evident verbal and mental reservations to the teaching of the Second Vatican Council in general and to ‘Nostra Aetate’ in particular.”

“In fact,” he said, “the extreme gravity of the counter-witness of those who have, for centuries, abused the name of Christ and the term Christian to persecute and oppress the Jews must never be forgotten or underestimated in any way.”

http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/1201832.htm 

Also see:

Opus Pharisaei

Pharisaic ‘Christmas’

December 19, 2011
Pictured is Bishop Oscar Cantu, of the Opus Pharisaei line of succession [he was consecrated by Opus ‘Dei’ Bishop José Horacio Gómez who we documented also lighting a menorah with Rabbi Aryeh Scheinberg HERE]. Rabbi Scheinberg expects this kind of slavish ‘Noahidism’ from his ‘Christian’ subordinates. Rabbi Scheinberg is ‘Noahide’ fanatic, John Hagee’s handler.

We recently looked at the Pharisaic musings of the Opus ‘Dei’ prelate, Msgr. Fernando Ocáriz, who SSPX Superior Bp. Fellay’s representatives have been ‘dialoging’ with for the past two years on the Vatican II documents HERE. In a news article published on the SSPX website it is reported that the rabbi-concocted Vatican II document, Nostra Aetate, was not even on the table in the two years of this ‘dialogue.’

Bp. Fellay seems to favor a ‘personal prelature,’ the kind of arrangement Opus ‘Dei’ has.

Rabbi Aryeh Scheinberg (center, with beard) and Bishop Oscar Cantu (left) light a menorah Thursday, Dec. 15, 2011 at the San Fernando Hall during a Catholic and Jewish celibration of Hanukkah.

http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/religion/article/Catholics-Jews-bond-over-Hanukkah-lighting-2406054.php

From the San Fernando Cathedral bulletin:

SAN FERNANDO CATHEDRAL SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS JUNE 13, 2010

“Everyone is welcome to attend the Mass on Saturday, June 26 at 10:00 am, honoring St. Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer, founder of Opus Dei.”

The Mass will be celebrated by Bishop Oscar Cantú and concelebrated by Very Rev. Eduardo Castillo.

Following a profound spiritual retreat, Fr. Josemaría Escrivá founded Opus Dei in Madrid on 2 October 1928, opening a new way for the faithful to sanctify themselves in the midst of the world through their work and fulfillment of their personal, family and social duties. Fr. Josemaría Es- crivá de Balaguer helped numerous people discern vocations to the priesthood and religious life, both active and contemplative. In 1943, he founded the Priestly Society of the Holy Cross, an association inseparably united to Opus Dei, to which belong thousands of diocesan priests around the world.

Pope John Paul II proclaimed Josemaría Escrivá a saint on October 6, 2002. He told those present at the canonization, “ the founder of Opus Dei, Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer, was chosen by the Lord to proclaim the universal call to holiness and to indicate that everyday life, its customary activities, are a path towards holiness. … in the case of Opus Dei, to spread through every sector of society a deep awareness of the universal call to sanctity and apostolate, and more specifically of the sanctifying value of ordinary work.”

Opus Pharisaei

December 6, 2011
Msgr. Fernando Ocáriz, the Vicar General of Opus “Dei” (Opus Pharisaei, in truth) is one of Pope Benedict’s representatives in the theological discussions that took place between the SSPX and Rome from 2009-2011. The day after we commented on Bp. Fellay’s recent ‘interview’ and pointed to the discrepancy in Rome’s allowance for discussion of Vatican II teachings while anathematizing discussion of ‘The Holocaust,’ a work of artifice from Msgr. Fernando Ocáriz was published in the Pope’s journal, L’Osservatore Romano HERE.

This document contains a formula which amounts to relativistic tyranny:

The [Second Vatican] Council’s [innovative] doctrinal teachings require of the faithful a degree of assent called “religious submission of will and intellect”. Precisely because it is “religious” assent, such assent is not based purely on rational motives. This kind of adherence does not take the form of an act of faith. Rather, it is an act of obedience that is not merely disciplinary, but is well-rooted in our confidence in the divine assistance given to the Magisterium, and therefore “within the logic of faith and under the impulse of obedience to the faith” …

… A number of innovations of a doctrinal nature are to be found in the documents of the Second Vatican Council … These innovations in matters concerning faith or morals, not proposed with a definitive act, still require religious submission of intellect and will …

I take this as an answer to Proud Pharisee David Rosen’s self-interested insistence that Nostra Aetate and Lumen Gentium be considered “fundamental doctrines of the Church,” and that it be impossible to question them “without challenging the authority of the church.”

Those who know the religion of Judaism know what’s going on here. The rabbis “don’t listen to heavenly voices.” They say, “the Torah is not in heaven.” Their god says, “my sons have defeated me.” Their god is mutable; nothing more than a totem the possession of which gives them absolute, tyrannical authority which they use to innovate and enforce doctrines as needed, or to destroy and blot out problematic doctrines.

Expect much more of this kind of relativisation of perennial Church teaching enforced by absolute authority (at the service of the rabbis) as long as religious relations with the rabbis continue. And play close attention to how that authority is selectively enforced.

Also see:

Benedict’s “Hermeneutic of Continuity” and the Rabbinic “Genius”

A Christmas meditation by Bishop Richard Williamson

December 21, 2010

Bp. Williamson’s message and its timing calls to mind the practical wisdom in Frank Capra’s film, It’s a Wonderful Life. It seems a fitting time to juxtapose the celebration of the Incarnation of the benevolent, self-sacrificing God of all creation against the god of this world who destroys men’s souls through temptations of temporal gain.

From the time that Jesus cleared the money changers from the Temple of Jerusalem until not too long ago, suspicion of money men was characteristic of Christian culture. But 17 years before the Hollywood(!) release of It’s a Wonderful Life, the Vatican had brought in Bernardino Nogara to manage its finances in 1929 on his condition that he would not be restricted in any way by Church teaching. This was only an echo of the Renaissance Vatican’s use of Judaic bankers unrestricted by Church teaching and permitted by Orthodox Judaism to employ predatory economics. And it seems this tradition from the supposedly utopian pre-Vatican II era is upheld by traditionalist Bishop, Bernard Fellay of the SSPX, all much to the detriment of the Gospel of the Lord who execrated mammonism.

There’s a scene in It’s a Wonderful Life which imparts a lesson of great value. With the Bailey Building and Loan Association near collapse, George Bailey visits the town moneylender and slumlord, Henry Potter who makes a proposition. Potter offers George Bailey an ‘opportunity’ to work for him in exchange for a large salary, the biggest house in town, business trips to New York and Europe with a three year contract. The Bailey Building and Loan Association–the only obstacle to Potter controlling the entire town–would, of course, be allowed to collapse and its shareholders would become victims to Potter. At this realization George Bailey, a man of responsibility and self-sacrifice only momentarily cajoled by Potter’s temptation, rejects the offer in disgust.

It’s not said explicitly what would happen at the end of the three year contract proposed to George Bailey, if the contract was even honored, but the rest of the story makes clear that if the Bailey Building and Loan was broken, and Potter’s control of the town was consolidated, the best George Bailey might hope for would be to assist Potter in the predation on the people he once defended from it–for a pittance.

One can’t help but see how this once commonplace wisdom was lost to the Irish who recently squandered their birthright for a few years of illusionary prosperity. But this is only a stark example of the same story being played out throughout Europe and the world. When the house of prayer becomes a den of thieves it can only follow by necessity that the rest of society will be taken by the same thieves.

See:

A Christmas meditation by Bishop Richard Williamson

Pro-Abortion Rabbi Given Altar at Austin, Texas Church

September 16, 2010

Rome has been a host to pro-abortion rabbis and their pro-abortion religion (see: Judaism Discovered, 878-885) for many centuries.

Planned Parenthood Rabbi Given Pulpit at Austin Catholic Church

By John-Henry Westen

AUSTIN, TX, September 15, 2010 (LifeSiteNews.com) – Rabbi Alan Freedman is a big name in the abortion industry in Texas; according to his information page at Temple Beth Shalom, he is currently “serving on the Board of Planned Parenthood in Austin.” The Planned Parenthood website confirms the fact. Despite this, the rabbi has been given permission to hold Jewish religious services at the St. Louis Catholic Church in Austin Texas. Next Saturday, the Catholic Mass will even be relegated to the chapel, while the Jewish service, led by the Planned Parenthood rabbi, meets in the main body of the Church …

Fr. Covington said that the “parish’s hospitality to Temple Beth Shalom for the celebration of the Jewish High Holy Days of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur” was undertaken with the “permission of the diocesan [Opus Judei affiliated] Bishop [Joe S. Vasquez].”

full article:

http://www.lifesitenews.com/ldn/2010/sep/10091514.html

Opus Judei Archbishop Gomez

April 14, 2010

Cardinal Mahony’s replacement, Opus “Dei” Archbishop Gomez lighting a menorah in San Antonio in 2006 with John Hagee’s rabbi, Aryeh Scheinberg.


Archbishop Jose Gomez lights a menorah

Opus Judei Glosses on the Talmudic Novus Ordo "Offertory"

February 21, 2010

An “Opus Dei” priest by the name Juan José Silvestre Valór of “Opus Dei’s” “Pontifical University of the Holy Cross” has written an exceedingly strained article which endeavors to “show the spiritual richness” of the “simplified” “Offertory” of the Novus Ordo Mass. “Simplified” is how this priest euphemizes the complete replacement of the traditional Offertory.

I call attention specifically to the cuckoo egg often described as “Jewish table blessings” of the Novus Ordo “Offertory” which Craig Heimbichner has shown to be of talmudic origin. Reading the article, one might note that the author cites (mostly modern) supporting sources for nearly every point made, but when he arrives at the “Jewish table blessings” footnotes are absent and the artifice is at its height.

One might ask, can’t this professor of liturgy at the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross and consultor to the Office of the Liturgical Celebrations of the Supreme Pontiff show us from scripture or some other authoritative source that these “Jewish table blessings” were part of the ancient Passover ritual as he suggests? And shouldn’t he first establish the factuality of his suggestion that the Israelites recited these benedictions at Passover before claiming that they “anticipated the paschal mystery of Jesus Christ” and that “the definitive reality of the sacrifice of Christ interpenetrate(s)” them? On what foundation, other than his own ethereal prose, does he rest these mighty claims? None.

This is the “work” of “Opus Dei:” making that which is alien seem intrinsic. This is not the work of God. This is lying fruit from an organization whose title is itself a deception.

See the Novus Ordo “Preparation of the Gifts” and the talmudic benedictions for bread and wine contrasted with the traditional Offertory of the Latin Mass here:

Talmudic Benedictions in the Novus Ordo Mass

In 2008 traditional Catholics were celebrating Benedict XVI’s “shakeup” of his liturgical commission with new appointees including the “Opus Dei” author of the above-referenced article, and members of the homosexual predator founded “Legionaries of Christ”:

Liturgical shakeup: Benedict XVI replaces all members of Office of Liturgical Celebrations of the Supreme Pontiff

Also see:

Opus Judei

Opus Judei Founder, Escriba Preached Kabbalistic Doctrine, Tikkun Olam

Interview With a Judaizer from Valencia

February 26, 2008

St. Vincent Ferrer of Valencia is said to have converted tens of thousands of Jews to the Christian faith by his preaching in the early 15th century. Nevertheless, the city has always had more than its share of conversos. Today, Valencia is an “Opus Dei” hotbed. It’s said that “Opus Dei” aggressively recruits doctors, lawyers, judges, government officials, and those who hold high positions in finance. Is the Judaizing neurosurgeon from Valencia interviewed below an “Opus Dei” member? His “work” suggests so. Of course, it wouldn’t be necessary to speculate if “Opus Dei” wasn’t a secret society.

More Catholics Interested in Jewish World

Interview With President of Valencia’s Judeo-Christian Friendship

By Inmaculada Álvarez

VALENCIA, Spain, FEB. 25, 2008 (Zenit.org).- More and more Catholics are taking an interest in the Jewish world, our “older brothers in the faith,” said the president and founder of the association Judeo-Christian Friendship of Valencia.

Francisco Fontana Tormo, a Catholic and neurosurgeon, received in November from the Parliament of Israel the Samuel Toledano Prize for his contribution to the dialogue between Jews and Christians.

In this interview with ZENIT, Fontana speaks of his work and association, and the status of Jewish-Christian relations.

Q: In what does this recognition consist and what has it involved for you?

Fontana: The Samuel Toledano Prize was instituted by the Toledano family in memory of Samuel Toledano, leader of the Jewish community of Madrid, who died in 1996. The prize is given annually to two researchers, one Israeli and the other Spanish, for a research work about the Jewish past in Spain, for the relations between Spain and Israel and for the relationships between Jews, Christians and Muslims.

Occasionally one is given a diploma of recognition for work, not research but activity, in the context of these areas. In this case, I have been given a diploma for my activities in promoting the mutual knowledge between Judaism and Christianity and maintaining good relations between both religions, as president and founder of the Judeo-Christian Friendship of Valencia.

For me it has implied great joy for what involves the recognition on the part of Jews for the Judeo-Christian relationship, and on the other hand, a deep emotion, since it was given to me by Isaac Navon, fifth president of Israel, in Kneset, the Parliament of Israel, and as well was an opportunity to travel again to Israel.

Q: What is the basis upon which the dialogue between Jews and Christians sits?

Fontana: We have a very similar concept on basic questions of morals and beliefs. There are many points in common: the importance of religion for personal and community life, the basic dignity of being human, created in the image and likeness of God, God as giver of the Ten Commandments, a salvation history which begins with Abraham, father of the believing.

We have the Bible in common. The Old Testament — or Hebrew Talmud — is contained in the Christian Bible. The Church has always been considered implanted into the ancient Israel. “If the root is holy, so are the branches. You […] were grafted in their place to share the richness of the olive tree.” (Romans 11:16-17).

Q: How has the Holocaust influenced this dialogue?

Fontana: The Holocaust has been determinant for Christianity to reopen its relationship with the Jewish people. The extermination of six million Jews during World War II has provoked the Christian Churches to ask themselves for their degree of responsibility in such a sizeable catastrophe, and whether or not an anti-Jewish Christianity had been a breeding ground for the Nazi persecution.

The Church has published a document, “We Remember; a Reflection on the Holocaust.” It has been like a veil has been lifted. The Catholic Church has taken into account that God does not break the Covenant with his people — the Covenant was never abolished, as it is said very accurately. Also, the creation of the modern state of Israel, reviving the Jewish state, after almost 1,900 years of being dispersed among the nations, is an exceptional fact and without comparison in the history of humanity.

Q: Has the vision of the Jewish world about Jesus Christ and about the Church changed?

Fontana: Very slowly but surely, the Jewish world is changing its perception of the Catholic Church. The visit of Pope John Paul II to Israel and his gesture of praying at the Wailing Wall were fundamental, leaving there a beautiful prayer: “God of our Fathers, you chose Abraham and his descendants, to bring Your Name to the nations. We are deeply sorry for sharing in that curse of history that caused suffering for your sons and we ask your forgiveness. We desire an authentic fraternity with the people of the Covenant.” This was a very important sign in the eyes of the Jewish people.

On the part of Judaism, it does not have a centralized authority like the figure of the Pope in the Catholic Church, there are many voices and at times these are discordant, but there was published in 2002 a manifesto signed by 150 rabbis titled “Dabru Emet” — To Speak the Truth. In it they recognize the change brought about by the Catholic Church and encouraged everyone to follow on this path of reconciliation and cooperation between Jews and Christians.

Q: Has the vision of Catholics about the Jewish world changed?

Fontana: In the Catholic Church it is also changing, however very slowly because the Catholic Church is very large and a change of direction cannot be brusque. On the part of the hierarchy they have published many official documents, which settle the doctrinal position of the Church.

The primary one is the Second Vatican Council declaration “Nostra Aetate” and the complementary documents “Orientations and Suggestions for the Application of the Conciliar Decree ‘Nostra Aetate’” and “Notes on the Correct Way to Present the Jews and Judaism in Preaching and Catechesis in the Catholic Church.” With these, the Catholic Church fixes its current position faced to the Jewish people. In fact, there is a Pontifical Commission for Religious Relations With the Jews.

But one thing is the official documents and the other is the reality up to which the faithful, the change is very slow but is already being taken, there is more and more interest by the Catholic faithful in knowing things about the Jews and getting along well with them. The Catholics are taking into account the fact that the Jews are a people who pray, who hang onto their faith, who maintain their traditions — an example in these times of secularization. “Our older bothers in the faith,” as John Paul II said.

Q: At what point is the dialogue and what are its perspectives?

Fontana: Currently the ice has been broken, there is no environment of hostility and there are desires to meet and even to cooperate on specific themes. There are projects of international assistance for the needy, Caritas and similar Jewish institutions, in countries of Africa, for example.

But there are goals to reach: referring to Judeo-Christian dialogue, a theological dialogue has not yet been entered into in-depth. We say that we are in the phase of greeting them and speaking about topics that do not produce frictions. The figure of Jesus Christ in his significance for Christians is difficult to approach for the Jews, just as the topic of the precepts of the Law of Moses is for Christians.

But yes, there are that could be talked about — creation, the fall, redemption, the figure of the Messiah and the interpretations of each religion, in the aspects in which they are common and in which they disagree.

Everything else is a task for the future.

http://www.zenit.org/article-21892?l=english

Also see:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/opus-judei.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2008/02/opus-dei-hebrew-catholic-connection.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/07/opus-judei-founder-escriba-preached.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/vatican-lesson-on-shekinah.html

Interview With a Judaizer from Valencia

February 26, 2008

St. Vincent Ferrer of Valencia is said to have converted tens of thousands of Jews to the Christian faith by his preaching in the early 15th century. Nevertheless, the city has always had more than its share of conversos. Today, Valencia is an “Opus Dei” hotbed. It’s said that “Opus Dei” aggressively recruits doctors, lawyers, judges, government officials, and those who hold high positions in finance. Is the Judaizing neurosurgeon from Valencia interviewed below an “Opus Dei” member? His “work” suggests so. Of course, it wouldn’t be necessary to speculate if “Opus Dei” wasn’t a secret society.

More Catholics Interested in Jewish World

Interview With President of Valencia’s Judeo-Christian Friendship

By Inmaculada Álvarez

VALENCIA, Spain, FEB. 25, 2008 (Zenit.org).- More and more Catholics are taking an interest in the Jewish world, our “older brothers in the faith,” said the president and founder of the association Judeo-Christian Friendship of Valencia.

Francisco Fontana Tormo, a Catholic and neurosurgeon, received in November from the Parliament of Israel the Samuel Toledano Prize for his contribution to the dialogue between Jews and Christians.

In this interview with ZENIT, Fontana speaks of his work and association, and the status of Jewish-Christian relations.

Q: In what does this recognition consist and what has it involved for you?

Fontana: The Samuel Toledano Prize was instituted by the Toledano family in memory of Samuel Toledano, leader of the Jewish community of Madrid, who died in 1996. The prize is given annually to two researchers, one Israeli and the other Spanish, for a research work about the Jewish past in Spain, for the relations between Spain and Israel and for the relationships between Jews, Christians and Muslims.

Occasionally one is given a diploma of recognition for work, not research but activity, in the context of these areas. In this case, I have been given a diploma for my activities in promoting the mutual knowledge between Judaism and Christianity and maintaining good relations between both religions, as president and founder of the Judeo-Christian Friendship of Valencia.

For me it has implied great joy for what involves the recognition on the part of Jews for the Judeo-Christian relationship, and on the other hand, a deep emotion, since it was given to me by Isaac Navon, fifth president of Israel, in Kneset, the Parliament of Israel, and as well was an opportunity to travel again to Israel.

Q: What is the basis upon which the dialogue between Jews and Christians sits?

Fontana: We have a very similar concept on basic questions of morals and beliefs. There are many points in common: the importance of religion for personal and community life, the basic dignity of being human, created in the image and likeness of God, God as giver of the Ten Commandments, a salvation history which begins with Abraham, father of the believing.

We have the Bible in common. The Old Testament — or Hebrew Talmud — is contained in the Christian Bible. The Church has always been considered implanted into the ancient Israel. “If the root is holy, so are the branches. You […] were grafted in their place to share the richness of the olive tree.” (Romans 11:16-17).

Q: How has the Holocaust influenced this dialogue?

Fontana: The Holocaust has been determinant for Christianity to reopen its relationship with the Jewish people. The extermination of six million Jews during World War II has provoked the Christian Churches to ask themselves for their degree of responsibility in such a sizeable catastrophe, and whether or not an anti-Jewish Christianity had been a breeding ground for the Nazi persecution.

The Church has published a document, “We Remember; a Reflection on the Holocaust.” It has been like a veil has been lifted. The Catholic Church has taken into account that God does not break the Covenant with his people — the Covenant was never abolished, as it is said very accurately. Also, the creation of the modern state of Israel, reviving the Jewish state, after almost 1,900 years of being dispersed among the nations, is an exceptional fact and without comparison in the history of humanity.

Q: Has the vision of the Jewish world about Jesus Christ and about the Church changed?

Fontana: Very slowly but surely, the Jewish world is changing its perception of the Catholic Church. The visit of Pope John Paul II to Israel and his gesture of praying at the Wailing Wall were fundamental, leaving there a beautiful prayer: “God of our Fathers, you chose Abraham and his descendants, to bring Your Name to the nations. We are deeply sorry for sharing in that curse of history that caused suffering for your sons and we ask your forgiveness. We desire an authentic fraternity with the people of the Covenant.” This was a very important sign in the eyes of the Jewish people.

On the part of Judaism, it does not have a centralized authority like the figure of the Pope in the Catholic Church, there are many voices and at times these are discordant, but there was published in 2002 a manifesto signed by 150 rabbis titled “Dabru Emet” — To Speak the Truth. In it they recognize the change brought about by the Catholic Church and encouraged everyone to follow on this path of reconciliation and cooperation between Jews and Christians.

Q: Has the vision of Catholics about the Jewish world changed?

Fontana: In the Catholic Church it is also changing, however very slowly because the Catholic Church is very large and a change of direction cannot be brusque. On the part of the hierarchy they have published many official documents, which settle the doctrinal position of the Church.

The primary one is the Second Vatican Council declaration “Nostra Aetate” and the complementary documents “Orientations and Suggestions for the Application of the Conciliar Decree ‘Nostra Aetate’” and “Notes on the Correct Way to Present the Jews and Judaism in Preaching and Catechesis in the Catholic Church.” With these, the Catholic Church fixes its current position faced to the Jewish people. In fact, there is a Pontifical Commission for Religious Relations With the Jews.

But one thing is the official documents and the other is the reality up to which the faithful, the change is very slow but is already being taken, there is more and more interest by the Catholic faithful in knowing things about the Jews and getting along well with them. The Catholics are taking into account the fact that the Jews are a people who pray, who hang onto their faith, who maintain their traditions — an example in these times of secularization. “Our older bothers in the faith,” as John Paul II said.

Q: At what point is the dialogue and what are its perspectives?

Fontana: Currently the ice has been broken, there is no environment of hostility and there are desires to meet and even to cooperate on specific themes. There are projects of international assistance for the needy, Caritas and similar Jewish institutions, in countries of Africa, for example.

But there are goals to reach: referring to Judeo-Christian dialogue, a theological dialogue has not yet been entered into in-depth. We say that we are in the phase of greeting them and speaking about topics that do not produce frictions. The figure of Jesus Christ in his significance for Christians is difficult to approach for the Jews, just as the topic of the precepts of the Law of Moses is for Christians.

But yes, there are that could be talked about — creation, the fall, redemption, the figure of the Messiah and the interpretations of each religion, in the aspects in which they are common and in which they disagree.

Everything else is a task for the future.

http://www.zenit.org/article-21892?l=english

Also see:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/opus-judei.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2008/02/opus-dei-hebrew-catholic-connection.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/07/opus-judei-founder-escriba-preached.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/vatican-lesson-on-shekinah.html