Archive for the ‘Nitel Nacht’ Category

Elder Brothers Traditional Christmas Hate

December 24, 2009

Read a traditional Judaic children’s Christmas Eve (“Nitel Night”) story and consider how this dreary, paranoid, hate-filled, tribal tradition can account for the relentless Judaic attack on Christmas. The “elder brothers” have traditionally taught their children to not only to fear and hate Jesus, but to believe that He is the cause of all their problems, through tales that long predate Stephen King and upstage him immeasurably in ponderous gloom:

” … Up to the end of the Jews’ street he walked at ease, but at the corner, where began the enemy’s world, he stopped like a frightened hare, scenting the hunter’s hounds … He passed the cemetery without a tremor; on that night [Christmas Eve] it was but the living he feared. The next turning brought him to the church. He remembered his mother’s warning not to pass it … Just as he came opposite the church door, it opened, and forth came a laughing group of men and girls who hurried away, the last one leaving the door ajar. From the shadow into which he had crept, Hirshl could look within, down to the shining altar where hung a half-naked, blood-stained effigy of Jesus of Nazareth.

“It is their God,” he thought, and gazed with fear and loathing at the ghastly figure. In his mind there loomed mystically, vaguely, but fearfully, the consciousness that the source of all their troubles lay in that horrible figure.

How spectral the gloom of those shadowy knaves! What harrowing mysteries hid behind those dark chancel doors! Was it there they kept that awful host, on account of which the Jews had to stay in their houses during Passion week,* and which bled–so the Christians said–when a Jew looked upon it? Then a chancel door began slowly and silently to slide ajar, and Hershl turned and fled in terror …” (“Nittel Nacht,” A Renegade and Other Tales, edited by Martha Wolfenstein, Kessinger Publishing)

http://books.google.com/books?id=Aw1sXSZ5niQC&lpg=PA6&dq=wolfenstein%20nittel-nacht&pg=PA133#v=onepage&q=&f=false

The canon of Judaic fables of total goy evil contrasted against total “Jew” saintly victimhood, which functions as a virtual wall between the tribe and ‘the goyim,’ extends far beyond this collection. This and other collections, such as Lilith’s Cave, contain many such tales, but they are only adaptations for children of the tribal paranoia and hate of Talmud and Kabbalah.

* see: Reckless Rites, Elliot Horowitz, pp.172-174, Princeton University Press

Also see:

How Benedict’s Elder Brothers Observe Christmas Eve

What Does Christmas Have To Do With The Hanging Of Saddam Hussein?

Amalek, Haman, and Christians

What Does Christmas Have To Do With The Hanging Of Saddam Hussein?

December 24, 2008

According to Benedict’s elder brothers in the faith, quite a lot. More arcana of the hateful rabbinic desecration of Christmas eve “Nitel Nacht” (Nativity Night of the Hanged One) is revealed here amidst many pious rationalizations for this extreme hatred based in delusional allegations of “not rivers, but oceans” of “Klal Yisael’s blood” spilled by “Yeshu’s” followers over the centuries “just because they were ‘Jews'” (“Yeshu” being the hateful acronym for “may his [Jesus’] name be blotted out”). The depth and intensity of the rabbis’ hatred for Jesus Christ strains credulity. What a solid basis for religious relations! What a fraud Benedict and the bishops are involved in.

Teves And Saddam

BY RAV ARYEHZ. GINZBERG

CHOFETZ CHAIM TORAH CENTER

Timing is everything. As Torah Jews, we accept certain beliefs of ours as the ultimate truth. One of these is that everything that happens in the world happens for Klal Yisrael—“ha’kol bishvil Yisrael.” Another truth is that every-thing that happens is all for the good of Klal Yisrael—“kol d’avad Shemaya, le’tav avad.” While at times it’s hard to see the “good,” especially in painful times, we know and believe in the depths of our collective neshamos that it is truly and completely good (and we will surely one day soon merit to finally understand all these painful events).

What is not that well known is that everything that happens to Klal Yisrael, for the good of Klal Yisrael, happens at a specific moment in time that also has great significance for us. A prominent example of just such timing is the selection of the month of Adar by the evil Haman to carry out his plan for the “final solution” of Klal Yisrael. But the choice of Adar, a significant month for the good mazal of Klal Yisrael, actually worked against him and helped turn around his plan “from yagon to simcha.”

The hanging several days ago of Saddam Hussein, a decades-old enemy of Klal Yisrael, was not only an event of great significance, but its very timing was significant, as well.

We should never forget even for a moment the depth of this rasha’s hatred for Klal Yisrael. Recall the raining down of Scud missiles on Eretz Yisrael more than a decade ago during the first Gulf War and the terrible fear that every Jew in Eretz Yisrael lived with day in and day out for weeks at end. Then there was the reward of $20,000 paid to every family of a suicide bomber after their murderous acts were performed, as an incentive for others to follow. The largest construction project for a new mosque built in one of the Arab villages in years was financed by this rasha as a reward for their having provided the most suicide bombers from one town (yemach shemam).

And so while we can take a deep sigh of relief (at least for the moment) at his death, it is important for us to focus briefly on the timing of his death. The Ramban writes that we can learn more about HaKadosh Baruch Hu’s plans for Klal Yisrael from the timing of events than from the events themselves.

My son Dovid Simcha came home on Asarah B’Teves, a day when Klal Yisrael remembers the day when a siege was laid upon the Beis HaMikdash by Nevuchadnetzar’s army, which finally destroyed the Beis HaMikdash three and a half years later, on Tishah B’Av.

This rasha, Saddam Hussein, made the very arrogant and frightful claim years ago that he is a reincarnation of his ancestor Nevuchadnetzar and will complete the job of removing Klal Yisrael from the face of the earth. How from yeshiva on Asarah B’Teves and shared with us an insight from his wonderful rebbi (Rav Shimon Finkelman), the sixth-grade rebbi at the wonderful Yeshiva Darchei Torah. The rebbi commented on the timing of Saddam’s burial befitting to have his burial on the very day that we remember the evil of his infamous ancestor of more than two thousand years ago!

Allow me to share an insight of my own. The actual day of Saddam’s hanging was an auspicious day, as well, for Klal Yisrael. The pre-dawn hanging took place on the day of the Jewish calendar known as tes Teves, the ninth day of Teves. The Mishnah in Maseches Ta‘anis mentions three consecutive days of ta‘anis, the only days of the year of consecutive fast days: the 8th, 9th, and 10th days of Teves. Today we only fast on the third of these days, which is Asarah B’Teves.

The Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chaim 580:2) in describing the difficult fast days of the year makes reference to these three days, and when it comes to the 9th day of Teves, the mechaber writes “it’s not known which terrible events took place on that day to warrant a fast day.” (The same language is to be found in the Tur and in the Behag). The Mishnah Berurah, in quoting from the Magen Avraham, comments that we find in the Selichos which we recite on Asarah B’Teves that Ezra HaSofer died that day. (As to why the Tur and the Shulchan Aruch did not make reference to this fact of Ezra HaSofer’s death, see Derashos Chasam Sofer and Sefer Ohr Gedalyah on Asarah B’Teves for an insightful explanation).

However, there is another explanation found in rishonim as to what the tragic events of the 9th day of Teves were, that makes it easier to understand why the Shulchan Aruch chose to write the words “we do not know what tragic event took place on that day.”

The Tosfeos Chadashim (on Maseches Ta‘anis) explains that the birth of “Yeshu HaNatzri” took place on tekufas Teves, which on the year of his birth fell out on the 9th day of Teves. Our Chachamim decreed a ta‘anis on that very day for all the pain and suffering that Klal Yisrael would go through at the hands of his followers over the millennia. Not rivers, but oceans of blood have been spilled by the followers of the church in every corner of the world—through blood libels, pogroms, crusades, inquisitions, and forced conversions. Taking all of this suffering into account, the fast of the ninth day of Teves has that much more significance to us.

We can now understand why the Tur and Shulchan Aruch wrote that the tragic events of this day are not known, for it would be instant death at the hands of the Christian censors to write such “blasphemy,” and so they instead chose to write that the events of that day are not known to us.

While there is no direct source for this being the date of Yeshu’s birth, the sefarim ha’kedoshim reveal it to us in the acronym of his description itself. He is referred to in sifrei rishonim (see Terumas HaDeshen, Meiri in his introduction to Avos, and Tosefos HaRosh in Sotah 47a) as the “Nitel one” (meaning the one who was hanged). The four letters of the Hebrew spelling of “nitel” spell out the words “Nolad Yeshu Tes LeTeves” (“Yeshu was born on the 9th day of Teves”).

As to the specific year of his birth, there is much discussion in the rishonim, as well. Some rishonim claim that he was a student of Rabbi Yehoshuaben Perachia, who lived about 180 years before the churban Bayis Sheini (see Raavad in Sefer Kabballah, Sefer Eshkol, Tosefos Chachmei Angliah on Sanhedrin 77a), and others claim he lived in the days of Hilni Hamalkah around 70 years before the churban (see Tosefos HaRosh Sotah 47a; Hagahos HaYaivetz, Avodah Zara 17a) (A more detailed explanation of Yesha’s life and death in the words of Chazal are beyond the purview of our discussion, and will iy’H be discussed in greater detail in a subsequent article.)

So tekufas Teves is a period in the Jewish calendar that not only ushers in the winter season but brings along a dark period where the world is filled with what the Chachmei Kabbalah refer to as “Klipas HaTumah.” It is during this period that the negative forces of spiritual impurity are allowed to penetrate even the atmosphere of
kedushah in Klal Yisrael, hence the ancient minhag of Chassidim of not learning Torah on nitel nacht. And it is only in such a period of Tekufas Teves, of spiritual impurity, that such a powerful force of tumah could be created that would wreak havoc and destruction on Klal Yisrael for 2,000 years.

There are various minhagim as to when nitel nacht actually is. Some hold it’s December 25; others hold January 6 (some, like the Minchas Elazar, hold both); however, the early mekubalim actually hold it’s on tekufas Teves itself, which has been identified by the date of the 9th day of Teves.

And so I wondered, what is the message to us that the Nevuchadnetzar of our day—that evil, Jew-hating rasha, Saddam Hussein—was hanged on the very day of tes Teves, the day recorded in sefarim as the birth of the Nitel one (the one who was hanged)!

While Hashem’s ways are hidden from us, I see a possible message of chizuk to us. Over the generations, as our forefathers were murdered and butchered just for being Jews, what did we do? We davened the words “dam avadav yikom,” retribution shall be exacted by Him, by HaKadosh Baruch Hu himself.

Over the last 20 or so years, we suffered Scud attacks and suicide bombers financed by that evil person, and we were unable to respond. Our only response was taking siddur in hand and crying out in unison, “dam avodov yikom.” And what has happened?

In just a few years, without our firing a shot, HaKadosh Baruch Hu has placed one of the chasidei umos ha’olam in the highest position in this country, and that rasha in Iraq has been brought to his knees, humiliated, and finally hanged on the gallows—not just at any time, but on tes Teves, the day of the birth of the “Nitel one.”

Just maybe the hopeful message to us is that HaKadosh Baruch Hu will continue to be yikom, to exact retribution on all the evil forces that have caused us so much suffering over so many years. The navi promises us that the very day of Asarah B’Teves, which is referred to as the day of “aschalta deperunsia” (the beginning of our punishment) will one day be turned into a day of yagon, sasson, and simcha for all eternity. May it happen speedily in our day!

http://www.5tjt.com/pdfs/20060105_Issue.pdf.pdf

What Does Christmas Have To Do With The Hanging Of Saddam Hussein?

December 24, 2008

According to Benedict’s elder brothers in the faith, quite a lot. More arcana of the hateful rabbinic desecration of Christmas eve “Nitel Nacht” (Nativity Night of the Hanged One) is revealed here amidst many pious rationalizations for this extreme hatred based in delusional allegations of “not rivers, but oceans” of “Klal Yisael’s blood” spilled by “Yeshu’s” followers over the centuries “just because they were ‘Jews'” (“Yeshu” being the hateful acronym for “may his [Jesus’] name be blotted out”). The depth and intensity of the rabbis’ hatred for Jesus Christ strains credulity. What a solid basis for religious relations! What a fraud Benedict and the bishops are involved in.

Teves And Saddam

BY RAV ARYEHZ. GINZBERG

CHOFETZ CHAIM TORAH CENTER

Timing is everything. As Torah Jews, we accept certain beliefs of ours as the ultimate truth. One of these is that everything that happens in the world happens for Klal Yisrael—“ha’kol bishvil Yisrael.” Another truth is that every-thing that happens is all for the good of Klal Yisrael—“kol d’avad Shemaya, le’tav avad.” While at times it’s hard to see the “good,” especially in painful times, we know and believe in the depths of our collective neshamos that it is truly and completely good (and we will surely one day soon merit to finally understand all these painful events).

What is not that well known is that everything that happens to Klal Yisrael, for the good of Klal Yisrael, happens at a specific moment in time that also has great significance for us. A prominent example of just such timing is the selection of the month of Adar by the evil Haman to carry out his plan for the “final solution” of Klal Yisrael. But the choice of Adar, a significant month for the good mazal of Klal Yisrael, actually worked against him and helped turn around his plan “from yagon to simcha.”

The hanging several days ago of Saddam Hussein, a decades-old enemy of Klal Yisrael, was not only an event of great significance, but its very timing was significant, as well.

We should never forget even for a moment the depth of this rasha’s hatred for Klal Yisrael. Recall the raining down of Scud missiles on Eretz Yisrael more than a decade ago during the first Gulf War and the terrible fear that every Jew in Eretz Yisrael lived with day in and day out for weeks at end. Then there was the reward of $20,000 paid to every family of a suicide bomber after their murderous acts were performed, as an incentive for others to follow. The largest construction project for a new mosque built in one of the Arab villages in years was financed by this rasha as a reward for their having provided the most suicide bombers from one town (yemach shemam).

And so while we can take a deep sigh of relief (at least for the moment) at his death, it is important for us to focus briefly on the timing of his death. The Ramban writes that we can learn more about HaKadosh Baruch Hu’s plans for Klal Yisrael from the timing of events than from the events themselves.

My son Dovid Simcha came home on Asarah B’Teves, a day when Klal Yisrael remembers the day when a siege was laid upon the Beis HaMikdash by Nevuchadnetzar’s army, which finally destroyed the Beis HaMikdash three and a half years later, on Tishah B’Av.

This rasha, Saddam Hussein, made the very arrogant and frightful claim years ago that he is a reincarnation of his ancestor Nevuchadnetzar and will complete the job of removing Klal Yisrael from the face of the earth. How from yeshiva on Asarah B’Teves and shared with us an insight from his wonderful rebbi (Rav Shimon Finkelman), the sixth-grade rebbi at the wonderful Yeshiva Darchei Torah. The rebbi commented on the timing of Saddam’s burial befitting to have his burial on the very day that we remember the evil of his infamous ancestor of more than two thousand years ago!

Allow me to share an insight of my own. The actual day of Saddam’s hanging was an auspicious day, as well, for Klal Yisrael. The pre-dawn hanging took place on the day of the Jewish calendar known as tes Teves, the ninth day of Teves. The Mishnah in Maseches Ta‘anis mentions three consecutive days of ta‘anis, the only days of the year of consecutive fast days: the 8th, 9th, and 10th days of Teves. Today we only fast on the third of these days, which is Asarah B’Teves.

The Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chaim 580:2) in describing the difficult fast days of the year makes reference to these three days, and when it comes to the 9th day of Teves, the mechaber writes “it’s not known which terrible events took place on that day to warrant a fast day.” (The same language is to be found in the Tur and in the Behag). The Mishnah Berurah, in quoting from the Magen Avraham, comments that we find in the Selichos which we recite on Asarah B’Teves that Ezra HaSofer died that day. (As to why the Tur and the Shulchan Aruch did not make reference to this fact of Ezra HaSofer’s death, see Derashos Chasam Sofer and Sefer Ohr Gedalyah on Asarah B’Teves for an insightful explanation).

However, there is another explanation found in rishonim as to what the tragic events of the 9th day of Teves were, that makes it easier to understand why the Shulchan Aruch chose to write the words “we do not know what tragic event took place on that day.”

The Tosfeos Chadashim (on Maseches Ta‘anis) explains that the birth of “Yeshu HaNatzri” took place on tekufas Teves, which on the year of his birth fell out on the 9th day of Teves. Our Chachamim decreed a ta‘anis on that very day for all the pain and suffering that Klal Yisrael would go through at the hands of his followers over the millennia. Not rivers, but oceans of blood have been spilled by the followers of the church in every corner of the world—through blood libels, pogroms, crusades, inquisitions, and forced conversions. Taking all of this suffering into account, the fast of the ninth day of Teves has that much more significance to us.

We can now understand why the Tur and Shulchan Aruch wrote that the tragic events of this day are not known, for it would be instant death at the hands of the Christian censors to write such “blasphemy,” and so they instead chose to write that the events of that day are not known to us.

While there is no direct source for this being the date of Yeshu’s birth, the sefarim ha’kedoshim reveal it to us in the acronym of his description itself. He is referred to in sifrei rishonim (see Terumas HaDeshen, Meiri in his introduction to Avos, and Tosefos HaRosh in Sotah 47a) as the “Nitel one” (meaning the one who was hanged). The four letters of the Hebrew spelling of “nitel” spell out the words “Nolad Yeshu Tes LeTeves” (“Yeshu was born on the 9th day of Teves”).

As to the specific year of his birth, there is much discussion in the rishonim, as well. Some rishonim claim that he was a student of Rabbi Yehoshuaben Perachia, who lived about 180 years before the churban Bayis Sheini (see Raavad in Sefer Kabballah, Sefer Eshkol, Tosefos Chachmei Angliah on Sanhedrin 77a), and others claim he lived in the days of Hilni Hamalkah around 70 years before the churban (see Tosefos HaRosh Sotah 47a; Hagahos HaYaivetz, Avodah Zara 17a) (A more detailed explanation of Yesha’s life and death in the words of Chazal are beyond the purview of our discussion, and will iy’H be discussed in greater detail in a subsequent article.)

So tekufas Teves is a period in the Jewish calendar that not only ushers in the winter season but brings along a dark period where the world is filled with what the Chachmei Kabbalah refer to as “Klipas HaTumah.” It is during this period that the negative forces of spiritual impurity are allowed to penetrate even the atmosphere of
kedushah in Klal Yisrael, hence the ancient minhag of Chassidim of not learning Torah on nitel nacht. And it is only in such a period of Tekufas Teves, of spiritual impurity, that such a powerful force of tumah could be created that would wreak havoc and destruction on Klal Yisrael for 2,000 years.

There are various minhagim as to when nitel nacht actually is. Some hold it’s December 25; others hold January 6 (some, like the Minchas Elazar, hold both); however, the early mekubalim actually hold it’s on tekufas Teves itself, which has been identified by the date of the 9th day of Teves.

And so I wondered, what is the message to us that the Nevuchadnetzar of our day—that evil, Jew-hating rasha, Saddam Hussein—was hanged on the very day of tes Teves, the day recorded in sefarim as the birth of the Nitel one (the one who was hanged)!

While Hashem’s ways are hidden from us, I see a possible message of chizuk to us. Over the generations, as our forefathers were murdered and butchered just for being Jews, what did we do? We davened the words “dam avadav yikom,” retribution shall be exacted by Him, by HaKadosh Baruch Hu himself.

Over the last 20 or so years, we suffered Scud attacks and suicide bombers financed by that evil person, and we were unable to respond. Our only response was taking siddur in hand and crying out in unison, “dam avodov yikom.” And what has happened?

In just a few years, without our firing a shot, HaKadosh Baruch Hu has placed one of the chasidei umos ha’olam in the highest position in this country, and that rasha in Iraq has been brought to his knees, humiliated, and finally hanged on the gallows—not just at any time, but on tes Teves, the day of the birth of the “Nitel one.”

Just maybe the hopeful message to us is that HaKadosh Baruch Hu will continue to be yikom, to exact retribution on all the evil forces that have caused us so much suffering over so many years. The navi promises us that the very day of Asarah B’Teves, which is referred to as the day of “aschalta deperunsia” (the beginning of our punishment) will one day be turned into a day of yagon, sasson, and simcha for all eternity. May it happen speedily in our day!

http://www.5tjt.com/pdfs/20060105_Issue.pdf.pdf

St. John The Baptist Contra Benedict XVI

December 22, 2008

“And seeing many of the Pharisees and Sadducees coming to his baptism, [John the Baptist] said to them: Ye brood of vipers, who hath shewed you to flee from the wrath to come? Bring forth therefore fruits worthy of penance. And think not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham for our father. For I tell you that God is able of these stones to raise up children to Abraham. For now the axe is laid to the root of the trees. Every tree therefore that doth not yield good fruit, shall be cut down, and cast into the fire” (Matthew 3:7-10; Luke 3:7-9).

St. John the Baptist said these words to people who were true physical descendants of Abraham. He chastised them for their racial pride telling them that their descent from Abraham profits them nothing without repentance and good fruits and that God can raise up anyone–even stones–to be Israel if it pleases Him to do so.

Now, let us turn to Benedict XVI seeing many Pharisees of counterfeit Israel coming to him who claim to have Abraham for their father but do not, who produce rotten fruits in abundance and who are notoriously unrepentant. Benedict revels with them in their delusion telling them:

Dear friends, it is with great pleasure that I meet with you this evening … we share a relationship that should be strengthened and lived … we know that these fraternal bonds constitute a continual invitation to know and to respect one another better … the Catholic Church … respects the children of the Promise, the children of the Covenant, as her beloved brothers and sisters in the faith …

http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xvi/speeches/2008/september/documents/hf_ben-xvi_spe_20080912_parigi-juive_en.html

Learn how many of Benedict XVI’s beloved elder brothers and sisters in the rabbinic faith who he calls “children of the Promise,” and “children of the Covenant,” secretly express their hatred towards Jesus Christ and His followers on Christmas Eve:

How Benedict’s Elder Brothers Observe Christmas Eve

St. John The Baptist Contra Benedict XVI

December 22, 2008

“And seeing many of the Pharisees and Sadducees coming to his baptism, [John the Baptist] said to them: Ye brood of vipers, who hath shewed you to flee from the wrath to come? Bring forth therefore fruits worthy of penance. And think not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham for our father. For I tell you that God is able of these stones to raise up children to Abraham. For now the axe is laid to the root of the trees. Every tree therefore that doth not yield good fruit, shall be cut down, and cast into the fire” (Matthew 3:7-10; Luke 3:7-9).

St. John the Baptist said these words to people who were true physical descendants of Abraham. He chastised them for their racial pride telling them that their descent from Abraham profits them nothing without repentance and good fruits and that God can raise up anyone–even stones–to be Israel if it pleases Him to do so.

Now, let us turn to Benedict XVI seeing many Pharisees of counterfeit Israel coming to him who claim to have Abraham for their father but do not, who produce rotten fruits in abundance and who are notoriously unrepentant. Benedict revels with them in their delusion telling them:

Dear friends, it is with great pleasure that I meet with you this evening … we share a relationship that should be strengthened and lived … we know that these fraternal bonds constitute a continual invitation to know and to respect one another better … the Catholic Church … respects the children of the Promise, the children of the Covenant, as her beloved brothers and sisters in the faith …

http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xvi/speeches/2008/september/documents/hf_ben-xvi_spe_20080912_parigi-juive_en.html

Learn how many of Benedict XVI’s beloved elder brothers and sisters in the rabbinic faith who he calls “children of the Promise,” and “children of the Covenant,” secretly express their hatred towards Jesus Christ and His followers on Christmas Eve:

How Benedict’s Elder Brothers Observe Christmas Eve

How Benedict’s Elder Brothers Observe Christmas Eve

January 4, 2008

Aside from perpetuating the cover story claiming this tradition is based in fear of Christian violence, this 2004 article from the Israeli newspaper, Haaretz reveals quite a bit. The article doesn’t mention that the fundamental reason for the rabbinic mandate that “Jews” must not study “Torah” on Christmas eve is to prevent Jesus, who they believe is “on the side of uncleanness,” from benefiting from their study. This is alluded to in a Chabad inter-office memo shown below. Also, to enforce this mandate, the rabbis threatened that wild dogs would attack any “Jew” who studied “Torah” on Christmas eve.

For them, it’s wholly unholy

Christmas Eve is one of the few occasions when Hasidim refrain from Torah study, do not conduct weddings or go to the mikveh. But they do play chess and work on their bills

December 24, 2004
By Shahar Ilan, Haaretz

On Christmas Eve, known in Jewish circles as Nitel Night, the klipot (shells) are in total control. The klipot are parasitical evil forces that attach themselves to the forces of good. According to kabbala (Jewish mysticism), on the night on which “that man” – a Jewish euphemism for Jesus – was born, not even a trace of holiness is present and the klipot exploit every act of holiness for their own purposes.

For this reason, Nitel Night, from nightfall to midnight, is one of the few occasions when Hasidim refrain from Torah study. On this horrific night, they neither conduct weddings nor do they go to the mikveh (ritual bath). An entire folkloric literature has developed around the unusual recreational activities of Nitel Night. The customs, it should be emphasized, are practiced only by Hasidim. Lithuanian and Sephardic ultra-Orthodox Jews do not suspend their regular Torah study on Christmas Eve.

Chess and cards

The classic pastime on Nitel Night is chess. There is the famous photograph of the last Lubavitcher Rebbe, the late Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, apparently playing chess with his father on Nitel Night, although calendar calculations by Lubavitcher Hasidim rule out the idea that the photograph was taken on Nitel. Some prefer cards, such as Uka, a Galician Jewish version of poker, or 21. Some argue that each card has its own klipa (shell) and thus card-playing on Nitel Night is a particularly serious sin.

Kabbalistic toilet paper

The Knesset correspondent of the ultra-Orthodox newspaper Hamodia, Zvi Rosen, relates that celebrated Hasidic admorim (sect leaders) would cut a year’s supply of toilet paper for Sabbath use (to avoid tearing toilet paper on Sabbath) on this night. Actually, this disrespectful act has profound kabbalistic significance, because kabbalistic literature extensively discusses Christianity as waste material excreted from the body of the Jewish people. Today, precut toilet paper for Sabbath use is available on the market; thus, the custom’s relevance has diminished.

Another custom of Hasidic admorim is to make calculations on Nitel for the entire year, such as the amount they must set aside to observe the commandment of tithe-giving. Rabbi Hannah of Kalschitz reportedly would study geography on Nitel. The journalist Rosen spends Nitel night arranging his archive, peeling oranges and making marmalade. The Lubavitcher (Chabad) movement’s spokesman, Menachem Brod, arranges his pile of bills.

Abstaining from procreation

As was the case in 2000, Christmas Eve or Nitel Night this year falls on Friday night, and this fact has several significant ramifications. Because of this, certain acts that are desecrations of the Sabbath cannot be performed, such as cutting toilet paper or straightening out paperwork. Nor can one sleep throughout the entire Christmas Eve because of the obligation of eating the Friday night meal, although it is customary not to talk about sacred matters at the table when Christmas Eve falls on Friday night.

However, the biggest paradox concerns the procreation mitzvah (commandment). It is recommended that the commandment be observed on Friday night, which is a holy time. Yet on Nitel Night, which has no holiness, it is customary to refrain from observing the commandment, because of the fear that a Jewish child conceived on Jesus’ birthday could become an apostate.

A whispered prayer

Abraham Isaac Sperling’s “Reasons for Jewish Customs and Traditions (Bloch Publishing Company, 1968) explains that one chief reason for the development of Nitel customs was practical: Anti-Semites would ambush Jews and savagely beat them, sometimes even killing them, in the streets on Christmas Eve. Thus, the rabbis decreed that Jews should remain at home that night and not wander in the streets.

Over the years, abstention from Torah study on Christmas Eve became a custom that, of course, was observed clandestinely. There are tales, however, that describe cases where gentiles, discovering that Jews were playing games instead of studying Torah that night, would burst into Jewish homes, only to discover the young students engaged in the discussion of Jewish law over open books.

One Nitel custom in the Diaspora was to recite the entire “Aleinu Leshabe’ah” prayer out loud. The prayer includes the phrase “those who bow down before vapor and emptiness,” customarily uttered in a whisper throughout the year, so that gentiles would not hear the words. On Nitel Night, it was customary, after it had been ascertained that no non-Jews were around, to loudly utter the forbidden phrase.

Ban on Torah study

The source of the name “Nitel” is unknown. The most successful, although perhaps not the most convincing, explanation is that Nitel is an acronym for the Yiddish words “nischt yidden tarren lernen”: “It is forbidden for Jews to study.” Another explanation is that the term is a corruption of the Latin word for birthday, natalis.

How many Nitels?

Over the years, a collection of Nitel jokes has developed. For example, an ultra-Orthodox rabbi was once asked to eulogize Theodor Herzl, founder of modern Zionism and a secular Jew. After a few moments, he came up with three positive traits: Herzl had never spoken while putting on his phylacteries, had never thought about Torah matters in unclean places and had never studied Torah on Nitel. Or, for example, a young Jewish boy was found studying Torah on Nitel. Asked why he was not observing the ban on such study on Nitel, he replied that he observed the ban on the Armenian Christmas Eve.

The second joke points to a real problem. Roman Catholics and Protestants celebrate Christmas Eve on the night of December 24. Christmas on the Greek and Russian Orthodox calendars falls on January 6. On which day should Torah study be prohibited? The late Lubavitcher Rebbe proposed that Nitel be observed on the Christmas Eve celebrated by the majority of Christians in that particular country. In the United States, he ruled that Torah study should be banned on the night of December 24, when most Christian Americans celebrate Christmas Eve. Some Hasidic sect leaders and members have refrained from Torah study on both Christmas Eves, and the most meticulous of them even suspended Torah study on New Year’s Eve as well.

Slumber of the righteous

One of the early Lubavitcher leaders told his disciples that he disliked those scholars who argued that they could not suspend Torah study for even a few hours and that they therefore had to study Torah even on Christmas Eve. The Saintly Genius of Liska reportedly wanted to study Torah on a Nitel night. However, he fell into a deep sleep and his candle went out. When he awoke, he realized that divine intervention had kept him from carrying out his original purpose.

In an article on Nitel published in the Torah monthly, Moriah, Rabbi Yosef Lieberman offers a solution to circumvent the ban on Torah study: go to bed at nightfall and get up at midnight to study Torah, when such study becomes permissible. An expert on Hasidism, Rabbi Benzion Grossman relates that in the yeshivas of the Vishnitz Hasidim, the students would go to sleep in the afternoon prior to Christmas Eve and would get up at night to make up for the study hours they had missed. However, the Saintly Genius Rabbi Shalom of Kaminka would refrain from sleeping on Nitel, arguing that he always dreamed about Torah matters.

The Holy Land’s sacredness

Some people maintain that the Nitel customs need not be observed in Israel, because of the Holy Land’s sacredness. Rabbi Mordechai of Slonim ruled that, in the Holy Land, the klipot had no power – not even in Jerusalem, the site of many synagogues. Nonetheless, Hasidic sect leaders who came to the Holy Land continued the Nitel custom, and their disciples followed their example. In contrast, Lithuanian and Sephardic ultra-Orthodox Jews do not observe Nitel at all. “The Hasidim will look for any excuse not to study Torah,” quipped one Lithuanian Jewish cynic.

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/objects/pages/PrintArticleEn.jhtml?itemNo=518438

Nitel Nacht

A Jewish Custom surrounding the Eve of Dec 25th

BRIEF HISTORY AND INTRODUCTION

December 25th is universally celebrated by non-Jews, as the birthday of the person upon whom a dominant non-Jewish religion was founded and ‘who had the Halachic status as a Jew who lures other Jews to idol-worship’. A spirit of impurity therefore prevails on that day …

The Previous Rebbe stated, that ‘It is our custom to refrain from studying Torah on Nitel Nacht until midnight’. The reason, as the Previous Rebbe heard from his father, the Rebbe Rashab, is ‘not to add spiritual vitality’. In other words, not to add vitality to that person’ [who’s birth is celebrated on this night], and ‘those who presently follow his views [i.e. religion] …
http://ichossid.com/Print/Booklet/zos%20Chanukah%2012%20pp.pdf

How Benedict’s Elder Brothers Observe Christmas Eve

January 4, 2008

Aside from perpetuating the cover story claiming this tradition is based in fear of Christian violence, this 2004 article from the Israeli newspaper, Haaretz reveals quite a bit. The article doesn’t mention that the fundamental reason for the rabbinic mandate that “Jews” must not study “Torah” on Christmas eve is to prevent Jesus, who they believe is “on the side of uncleanness,” from benefiting from their study. This is alluded to in a Chabad inter-office memo shown below. Also, to enforce this mandate, the rabbis threatened that wild dogs would attack any “Jew” who studied “Torah” on Christmas eve.

For them, it’s wholly unholy

Christmas Eve is one of the few occasions when Hasidim refrain from Torah study, do not conduct weddings or go to the mikveh. But they do play chess and work on their bills

December 24, 2004
By Shahar Ilan, Haaretz

On Christmas Eve, known in Jewish circles as Nitel Night, the klipot (shells) are in total control. The klipot are parasitical evil forces that attach themselves to the forces of good. According to kabbala (Jewish mysticism), on the night on which “that man” – a Jewish euphemism for Jesus – was born, not even a trace of holiness is present and the klipot exploit every act of holiness for their own purposes.

For this reason, Nitel Night, from nightfall to midnight, is one of the few occasions when Hasidim refrain from Torah study. On this horrific night, they neither conduct weddings nor do they go to the mikveh (ritual bath). An entire folkloric literature has developed around the unusual recreational activities of Nitel Night. The customs, it should be emphasized, are practiced only by Hasidim. Lithuanian and Sephardic ultra-Orthodox Jews do not suspend their regular Torah study on Christmas Eve.

Chess and cards

The classic pastime on Nitel Night is chess. There is the famous photograph of the last Lubavitcher Rebbe, the late Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, apparently playing chess with his father on Nitel Night, although calendar calculations by Lubavitcher Hasidim rule out the idea that the photograph was taken on Nitel. Some prefer cards, such as Uka, a Galician Jewish version of poker, or 21. Some argue that each card has its own klipa (shell) and thus card-playing on Nitel Night is a particularly serious sin.

Kabbalistic toilet paper

The Knesset correspondent of the ultra-Orthodox newspaper Hamodia, Zvi Rosen, relates that celebrated Hasidic admorim (sect leaders) would cut a year’s supply of toilet paper for Sabbath use (to avoid tearing toilet paper on Sabbath) on this night. Actually, this disrespectful act has profound kabbalistic significance, because kabbalistic literature extensively discusses Christianity as waste material excreted from the body of the Jewish people. Today, precut toilet paper for Sabbath use is available on the market; thus, the custom’s relevance has diminished.

Another custom of Hasidic admorim is to make calculations on Nitel for the entire year, such as the amount they must set aside to observe the commandment of tithe-giving. Rabbi Hannah of Kalschitz reportedly would study geography on Nitel. The journalist Rosen spends Nitel night arranging his archive, peeling oranges and making marmalade. The Lubavitcher (Chabad) movement’s spokesman, Menachem Brod, arranges his pile of bills.

Abstaining from procreation

As was the case in 2000, Christmas Eve or Nitel Night this year falls on Friday night, and this fact has several significant ramifications. Because of this, certain acts that are desecrations of the Sabbath cannot be performed, such as cutting toilet paper or straightening out paperwork. Nor can one sleep throughout the entire Christmas Eve because of the obligation of eating the Friday night meal, although it is customary not to talk about sacred matters at the table when Christmas Eve falls on Friday night.

However, the biggest paradox concerns the procreation mitzvah (commandment). It is recommended that the commandment be observed on Friday night, which is a holy time. Yet on Nitel Night, which has no holiness, it is customary to refrain from observing the commandment, because of the fear that a Jewish child conceived on Jesus’ birthday could become an apostate.

A whispered prayer

Abraham Isaac Sperling’s “Reasons for Jewish Customs and Traditions (Bloch Publishing Company, 1968) explains that one chief reason for the development of Nitel customs was practical: Anti-Semites would ambush Jews and savagely beat them, sometimes even killing them, in the streets on Christmas Eve. Thus, the rabbis decreed that Jews should remain at home that night and not wander in the streets.

Over the years, abstention from Torah study on Christmas Eve became a custom that, of course, was observed clandestinely. There are tales, however, that describe cases where gentiles, discovering that Jews were playing games instead of studying Torah that night, would burst into Jewish homes, only to discover the young students engaged in the discussion of Jewish law over open books.

One Nitel custom in the Diaspora was to recite the entire “Aleinu Leshabe’ah” prayer out loud. The prayer includes the phrase “those who bow down before vapor and emptiness,” customarily uttered in a whisper throughout the year, so that gentiles would not hear the words. On Nitel Night, it was customary, after it had been ascertained that no non-Jews were around, to loudly utter the forbidden phrase.

Ban on Torah study

The source of the name “Nitel” is unknown. The most successful, although perhaps not the most convincing, explanation is that Nitel is an acronym for the Yiddish words “nischt yidden tarren lernen”: “It is forbidden for Jews to study.” Another explanation is that the term is a corruption of the Latin word for birthday, natalis.

How many Nitels?

Over the years, a collection of Nitel jokes has developed. For example, an ultra-Orthodox rabbi was once asked to eulogize Theodor Herzl, founder of modern Zionism and a secular Jew. After a few moments, he came up with three positive traits: Herzl had never spoken while putting on his phylacteries, had never thought about Torah matters in unclean places and had never studied Torah on Nitel. Or, for example, a young Jewish boy was found studying Torah on Nitel. Asked why he was not observing the ban on such study on Nitel, he replied that he observed the ban on the Armenian Christmas Eve.

The second joke points to a real problem. Roman Catholics and Protestants celebrate Christmas Eve on the night of December 24. Christmas on the Greek and Russian Orthodox calendars falls on January 6. On which day should Torah study be prohibited? The late Lubavitcher Rebbe proposed that Nitel be observed on the Christmas Eve celebrated by the majority of Christians in that particular country. In the United States, he ruled that Torah study should be banned on the night of December 24, when most Christian Americans celebrate Christmas Eve. Some Hasidic sect leaders and members have refrained from Torah study on both Christmas Eves, and the most meticulous of them even suspended Torah study on New Year’s Eve as well.

Slumber of the righteous

One of the early Lubavitcher leaders told his disciples that he disliked those scholars who argued that they could not suspend Torah study for even a few hours and that they therefore had to study Torah even on Christmas Eve. The Saintly Genius of Liska reportedly wanted to study Torah on a Nitel night. However, he fell into a deep sleep and his candle went out. When he awoke, he realized that divine intervention had kept him from carrying out his original purpose.

In an article on Nitel published in the Torah monthly, Moriah, Rabbi Yosef Lieberman offers a solution to circumvent the ban on Torah study: go to bed at nightfall and get up at midnight to study Torah, when such study becomes permissible. An expert on Hasidism, Rabbi Benzion Grossman relates that in the yeshivas of the Vishnitz Hasidim, the students would go to sleep in the afternoon prior to Christmas Eve and would get up at night to make up for the study hours they had missed. However, the Saintly Genius Rabbi Shalom of Kaminka would refrain from sleeping on Nitel, arguing that he always dreamed about Torah matters.

The Holy Land’s sacredness

Some people maintain that the Nitel customs need not be observed in Israel, because of the Holy Land’s sacredness. Rabbi Mordechai of Slonim ruled that, in the Holy Land, the klipot had no power – not even in Jerusalem, the site of many synagogues. Nonetheless, Hasidic sect leaders who came to the Holy Land continued the Nitel custom, and their disciples followed their example. In contrast, Lithuanian and Sephardic ultra-Orthodox Jews do not observe Nitel at all. “The Hasidim will look for any excuse not to study Torah,” quipped one Lithuanian Jewish cynic.

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/objects/pages/PrintArticleEn.jhtml?itemNo=518438

Nitel Nacht

A Jewish Custom surrounding the Eve of Dec 25th

BRIEF HISTORY AND INTRODUCTION

December 25th is universally celebrated by non-Jews, as the birthday of the person upon whom a dominant non-Jewish religion was founded and ‘who had the Halachic status as a Jew who lures other Jews to idol-worship’. A spirit of impurity therefore prevails on that day …

The Previous Rebbe stated, that ‘It is our custom to refrain from studying Torah on Nitel Nacht until midnight’. The reason, as the Previous Rebbe heard from his father, the Rebbe Rashab, is ‘not to add spiritual vitality’. In other words, not to add vitality to that person’ [who’s birth is celebrated on this night], and ‘those who presently follow his views [i.e. religion] …
http://ichossid.com/Print/Booklet/zos%20Chanukah%2012%20pp.pdf