Archive for the ‘National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education’ Category

Nun-Accomplice to Counterfeit Israel’s ‘Holocaust’ Proselytism to Speak at College of Saint Elizabeth

November 15, 2011

Sr. Gemma lives in [Counterfeit] Israel since 1975, and has led seminars at Yad Vashem [Counterfeit] Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem for more than 20 years as an educator at the international School of [Counterfeit] Holocaust Education. Her association with Yad Vashem began in 1987 when she approached the administrators with her idea to host seminars for Catholic educators in response to Pope John Paul II’s call to recognize the significance of the [Counterfeit] Holocaust.

“Woe to you scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites; because you go round about the sea and the land to make one proselyte; and when he is made, you make him the child of hell twofold more than yourselves.”

Leading Holocaust Educator Sister Gemma Del Duca Speaks at the College of Saint Elizabeth, November 16, 2011

Fran Sullivan – Morristown Green

November 10, 2011

Internationally known Holocaust educator Sister Gemma Del Duca, S.C., leads an interfaith dialogue entitled, Teaching Catholics about the Holocaust, Wednesday, November 16, from 7:30 to 9 p.m., in Dolan Performance Hall, College of Saint Elizabeth, 2 Convent Road, Morristown, N.J. The event, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the CSE Holocaust Education Resource Center.

Well Respected Leader in Holocaust Education Addresses College Audience
Sr. Gemma is the founder and co-director of Seton Hill University’s National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education, Greensburg, Pa., and she is also the former chair of the history department at the university.

Sr. Gemma lives in Israel since 1975, and has led seminars at Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem for more than 20 years as an educator at the international School of Holocaust Education. Her association with Yad Vashem began in 1987 when she approached the administrators with her idea to host seminars for Catholic educators in response to Pope John Paul II’s call to recognize the significance of the Holocaust. The seminars are intended for groups of Catholic educators and clergy, primarily from the United States. According to Yad Vashem’s records, hundreds of educators have taken part in the seminars. Her presence as lecturer and coordinator of the program is one of its most important components, according to Ephraim Kaye, who works with international educators at Yad Vashem.

“(Sr.) Gemma is the person who opened the door here to bringing Catholic educators to Yad Vashem,” said Kaye, “They have been a real dedicated and determined group of people who take back what they have learned here. We have (Sr.) Gemma to thank for that. It is really not to be taken for granted.”

In 2007, Yad Vashem honored Sr. Gemma with the Award for Excellence in Holocaust Education. She is the first non-Jewish and non-Israeli recipient.

Sponsored by the Sisters of Charity of Saint Elizabeth, Convent Station, New Jersey, the College of Saint Elizabeth enrolls more than 2,100 full- and part-time students in more than 25 undergraduate, 10 graduate and one doctoral degree programs. For information on other activities or programs, visit the College of Saint Elizabeth web site at http://www.cse.edu.

http://morristowngreen.com/2011/11/10/leading-holocaust-educator-sister-gemma-del-duca-speaks-at-the-college-of-saint-elizabeth-november-16-2011/

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News From the Occupied Pennsylvania Diocese

December 6, 2008

If some wealthy Catholics were to donate millions of dollars (yeah, right!) to Yeshiva University earmarked for the construction of a center for remembrance of the Bolshevik/Soviet Holocaust against Russian, Ukrainian, Hungarian, Armenian and other Christian ethnic groups and how the rabbis’ genocidal, racist teachings paved the road to that Holocaust via Moses Hess and Freemasonry, they would surely build it in the spirit of reciprocity and fairness … wouldn’t they?

In truth, even that wouldn’t bring parity which isn’t even desirable to begin with. ‘Jewish’-Catholic relations is completely irredeemable. A total fraud.

“Tikkun Olam” indeed.

See:

A Brief Study in Judeo-Masonic Double Standards

Cherished friends

Seton Hill President JoAnne Boyle calls Ethel LeFrak and her family “cherished friends” of the university.

Cherished, indeed.

Mrs. LeFrak, of New York City, has donated $750,000 to Seton Hill’s National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education.

The money will go toward endowing the Greensburg center’s Ethel LeFrak Holocaust Education Conference and creating The Ethel LeFrak Student Scholars of the Holocaust Fund.

The conference, held every three years, is for teachers and faculty members, mainly at Catholic schools. The intent is to enhance Catholic-Jewish understanding.

The fund will provide annual scholarships for students studying the Holocaust and related subjects.

The National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education is the only center of its kind. It was established in 1987.

One of the founders was Sister Gemma Del Duca, a Greensburg native and a Sister of Charity who now lives in Israel. She said in a statement from the university: “Ethel LeFrak’s generosity will help with the challenge that remains before us — to join our Jewish sisters and brothers in the great task of ‘Tikkun Olam,’ the mending of the world through reconciliation, understanding and education.”

Mrs. LeFrak and her family are involved in a number of philanthropic endeavors. Seton Hill granted her an honorary doctorate in 1996. (“Good Morning: East,” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, December 04, 2008)

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/08339/932513-56.stm

… Year-round, Catholic and Jewish high schools in the [Western Pennsylvania] region have an exchange program in which rabbis visit Catholic schools and priests visit Jewish schools to educate students about their religious differences and similarities. They’ve shared in holiday traditions, such as the Catholic students taking part in a Passover Seder meal.

“Because we share a common history with Judaism, it was thought that we should try to honor that by getting together,” said Don Teti, assistant superintendent for secondary schools in the Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh.

Near the holidays, Linda Pricer, principal and teacher at St. Bartholomew Catholic School in Penn Hills, incorporates a lesson about the Holocaust into her eighth-grade literature class.

“It’s mostly for tolerance,” she said. “To teach the students that we have to step up and that if there’s ever going to be a change in this world, we have to do it. When better to teach that lesson than now, during the holidays, when there is so much love and giving?” (“Season gives teachers chance to teach cultural differences,” Allison M. Heinrichs, Pittsburgh Tribune Review, December 4, 2008)


http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/east/s_601057.html

News From the Occupied Pennsylvania Diocese

December 6, 2008

If some wealthy Catholics were to donate millions of dollars (yeah, right!) to Yeshiva University earmarked for the construction of a center for remembrance of the Bolshevik/Soviet Holocaust against Russian, Ukrainian, Hungarian, Armenian and other Christian ethnic groups and how the rabbis’ genocidal, racist teachings paved the road to that Holocaust via Moses Hess and Freemasonry, they would surely build it in the spirit of reciprocity and fairness … wouldn’t they?

In truth, even that wouldn’t bring parity which isn’t even desirable to begin with. ‘Jewish’-Catholic relations is completely irredeemable. A total fraud.

“Tikkun Olam” indeed.

See:

A Brief Study in Judeo-Masonic Double Standards

Cherished friends

Seton Hill President JoAnne Boyle calls Ethel LeFrak and her family “cherished friends” of the university.

Cherished, indeed.

Mrs. LeFrak, of New York City, has donated $750,000 to Seton Hill’s National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education.

The money will go toward endowing the Greensburg center’s Ethel LeFrak Holocaust Education Conference and creating The Ethel LeFrak Student Scholars of the Holocaust Fund.

The conference, held every three years, is for teachers and faculty members, mainly at Catholic schools. The intent is to enhance Catholic-Jewish understanding.

The fund will provide annual scholarships for students studying the Holocaust and related subjects.

The National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education is the only center of its kind. It was established in 1987.

One of the founders was Sister Gemma Del Duca, a Greensburg native and a Sister of Charity who now lives in Israel. She said in a statement from the university: “Ethel LeFrak’s generosity will help with the challenge that remains before us — to join our Jewish sisters and brothers in the great task of ‘Tikkun Olam,’ the mending of the world through reconciliation, understanding and education.”

Mrs. LeFrak and her family are involved in a number of philanthropic endeavors. Seton Hill granted her an honorary doctorate in 1996. (“Good Morning: East,” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, December 04, 2008)

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/08339/932513-56.stm

… Year-round, Catholic and Jewish high schools in the [Western Pennsylvania] region have an exchange program in which rabbis visit Catholic schools and priests visit Jewish schools to educate students about their religious differences and similarities. They’ve shared in holiday traditions, such as the Catholic students taking part in a Passover Seder meal.

“Because we share a common history with Judaism, it was thought that we should try to honor that by getting together,” said Don Teti, assistant superintendent for secondary schools in the Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh.

Near the holidays, Linda Pricer, principal and teacher at St. Bartholomew Catholic School in Penn Hills, incorporates a lesson about the Holocaust into her eighth-grade literature class.

“It’s mostly for tolerance,” she said. “To teach the students that we have to step up and that if there’s ever going to be a change in this world, we have to do it. When better to teach that lesson than now, during the holidays, when there is so much love and giving?” (“Season gives teachers chance to teach cultural differences,” Allison M. Heinrichs, Pittsburgh Tribune Review, December 4, 2008)


http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/east/s_601057.html