Archive for the ‘marranos’ Category

Caribbean "Brothers in the Faith" Under Investigation for Child Trafficking, Sex Slavery

February 13, 2010
Jorge Puello [aka: Aaron Bentath]

“The report said the police had found documents connected to the Sephardic Jewish community in a house in San Salvador where the traffickers had held women.

Adviser to Detained Americans in Haiti Is Investigated

By MARC LACEY and IAN URBINA

February 11, 2010

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — The police in El Salvador have begun an investigation into whether a man suspected of leading a trafficking ring involving Central American and Caribbean women and girls is also a legal adviser to the Americans charged with trying to take 33 children out of Haiti without permission.

When the judge presiding over the Haitian case learned on Thursday of the investigation in El Salvador, he said he would begin his own inquiry of the adviser, a Dominican man who was in the judge’s chambers days before.

The inquiries are the latest twist in a politically charged case that is unfolding in the middle of an earthquake disaster zone. A lawyer for the group has already been dismissed after being accused of trying to offer bribes to get the 10 Americans out of jail.

The adviser, Jorge Puello, said in a telephone interview on Thursday that he had not engaged in any illegal activity in El Salvador and that he had never been in the country. He called it a case of mistaken identity. “I don’t have anything to do with El Salvador,” he said, suggesting that his name was as common in Latin America as John Smith is in the United States.

“There’s a Colombian drug dealer who was arrested with 25 IDs, and one of them had my name,” he said, not elaborating.

“Bring the proof,” he said when pressed about the child-trafficking accusations in the brief interview, which ended when he said he was entering an elevator. Reached later, he became angry and said he had broken no laws.

The 10 Americans have been imprisoned since Jan. 29 in the back of the same police station used by President René Préval as the seat of Haiti’s government since the earthquake. They had been told by their lawyers that at least some of them would be on their way home on Thursday. But the judge overseeing their case, Bernard Saint-Vil, recommended to the prosecutor that they be tentatively released from custody and permitted to leave the country as long as a representative stayed behind until the case was completed.

Mr. Puello has been acting as a spokesman and legal adviser in the Dominican Republic for some of the detainees.

The head of the Salvadoran border police, Commissioner Jorge Callejas, said in a telephone interview that he was investigating accusations that a man with a Dominican passport that identified him as Jorge Anibal Torres Puello led a human trafficking ring that recruited Dominican women and under-age Nicaraguan girls by offering them jobs and then putting them to work as prostitutes in El Salvador.

Mr. Puello said he did not even have a passport. When Mr. Callejas was shown a photograph taken in Haiti of Mr. Puello, Mr. Callejas said he thought it showed the man he was seeking. He said he would try to arrest Mr. Puello on suspicion of luring women into prostitution and taking explicit photographs of them that were then posted on Internet sites. “It’s him, the same beard and face,” Mr. Callejas said in an interview on Thursday. “It has to be him.”

Judge Saint-Vil also said he thought that the photo of the trafficking suspect in a Salvadoran police file appeared to be the same man he had met in court. He said he intended to begin his own investigation into whether a trafficking suspect had been working with the Americans detained in Haiti.

“I was skeptical of him because he arrived with four bodyguards, and I have never seen that from a lawyer,” the judge said in an interview. “I plan to get to the bottom of this right away.”

The judge said he would request assistance from the Department of Homeland Security to look into Mr. Puello’s background. A spokesman for the department said American officials were playing a supporting role in the investigation surrounding the Americans, providing “investigative support as requested.”

An Interpol arrest warrant has been issued for someone named Jorge Anibal Torres Puello, according to the police and public documents.

There were questions about whether Mr. Puello, the adviser, who said the Central Valley Baptist Church in Idaho had hired him to represent the Americans, was licensed to practice law. Records at the College of Lawyers in the Dominican Republic listed no one with his name.

Mr. Puello said he had a law license and was part of a 45-member law firm. But his office in Santo Domingo turned out to be a humble place, which could not possibly fit 45 lawyers. Mr. Puello’s brother Alejandro said that the firm had another office in the central business district, but he declined to provide an address.

Mr. Puello said in the interview that he had been representing the Americans free of charge because he was a religious man who commiserated with their situation. “I’m president of the Sephardic Jewish community in the Dominican Republic,” he said. “I help people in this kind of situation. We’re not going to charge these people a dime.”

But other lawyers for the detainees said that the families had wired Mr. Puello $12,000 to pay for the Americans’ transportation out of Haiti if they were released, and that they had been told by Mr. Puello in a conference call late Tuesday that he needed an additional $36,000. Mr. Puello said that he had not participated in a conference call.

One lawyer for the families said that Mr. Puello had told him that he was licensed to practice law in Florida, but the lawyer said he had checked and found no such record. Mr. Puello said in the interview that he had never said he was licensed in Florida.

Mr. Puello said that he had been born in Yonkers, N.Y., and that his mother was Dominican. He said that his full name was Jorge Puello and that he had no other names. But then in a subsequent interview he said his name was Jorge Aaron Bentath Puello. He said he was born in October 1976, and not in October 1977, which the police report indicates is the birth date of the suspect in the Salvadoran case.

The report said the police had found documents connected to the Sephardic Jewish community in a house in San Salvador where the traffickers had held women.

Blake Schmidt contributed reporting from San José, Costa Rica, and Jean-Michel Caroit from Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Kitty Bennett contributed research.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/12/world/americas/12haiti.html?hp

One wonders if Aaron Bentath was named after the High Priest of the slave trade, Aaron Lopez.

The centuries-old Judaic role in the slave trade in the Americas and the Caribbean is well documented:

Jews of the Black Holocaust

Advertisements

Interview With a Judaizer from Valencia

February 26, 2008

St. Vincent Ferrer of Valencia is said to have converted tens of thousands of Jews to the Christian faith by his preaching in the early 15th century. Nevertheless, the city has always had more than its share of conversos. Today, Valencia is an “Opus Dei” hotbed. It’s said that “Opus Dei” aggressively recruits doctors, lawyers, judges, government officials, and those who hold high positions in finance. Is the Judaizing neurosurgeon from Valencia interviewed below an “Opus Dei” member? His “work” suggests so. Of course, it wouldn’t be necessary to speculate if “Opus Dei” wasn’t a secret society.

More Catholics Interested in Jewish World

Interview With President of Valencia’s Judeo-Christian Friendship

By Inmaculada Álvarez

VALENCIA, Spain, FEB. 25, 2008 (Zenit.org).- More and more Catholics are taking an interest in the Jewish world, our “older brothers in the faith,” said the president and founder of the association Judeo-Christian Friendship of Valencia.

Francisco Fontana Tormo, a Catholic and neurosurgeon, received in November from the Parliament of Israel the Samuel Toledano Prize for his contribution to the dialogue between Jews and Christians.

In this interview with ZENIT, Fontana speaks of his work and association, and the status of Jewish-Christian relations.

Q: In what does this recognition consist and what has it involved for you?

Fontana: The Samuel Toledano Prize was instituted by the Toledano family in memory of Samuel Toledano, leader of the Jewish community of Madrid, who died in 1996. The prize is given annually to two researchers, one Israeli and the other Spanish, for a research work about the Jewish past in Spain, for the relations between Spain and Israel and for the relationships between Jews, Christians and Muslims.

Occasionally one is given a diploma of recognition for work, not research but activity, in the context of these areas. In this case, I have been given a diploma for my activities in promoting the mutual knowledge between Judaism and Christianity and maintaining good relations between both religions, as president and founder of the Judeo-Christian Friendship of Valencia.

For me it has implied great joy for what involves the recognition on the part of Jews for the Judeo-Christian relationship, and on the other hand, a deep emotion, since it was given to me by Isaac Navon, fifth president of Israel, in Kneset, the Parliament of Israel, and as well was an opportunity to travel again to Israel.

Q: What is the basis upon which the dialogue between Jews and Christians sits?

Fontana: We have a very similar concept on basic questions of morals and beliefs. There are many points in common: the importance of religion for personal and community life, the basic dignity of being human, created in the image and likeness of God, God as giver of the Ten Commandments, a salvation history which begins with Abraham, father of the believing.

We have the Bible in common. The Old Testament — or Hebrew Talmud — is contained in the Christian Bible. The Church has always been considered implanted into the ancient Israel. “If the root is holy, so are the branches. You […] were grafted in their place to share the richness of the olive tree.” (Romans 11:16-17).

Q: How has the Holocaust influenced this dialogue?

Fontana: The Holocaust has been determinant for Christianity to reopen its relationship with the Jewish people. The extermination of six million Jews during World War II has provoked the Christian Churches to ask themselves for their degree of responsibility in such a sizeable catastrophe, and whether or not an anti-Jewish Christianity had been a breeding ground for the Nazi persecution.

The Church has published a document, “We Remember; a Reflection on the Holocaust.” It has been like a veil has been lifted. The Catholic Church has taken into account that God does not break the Covenant with his people — the Covenant was never abolished, as it is said very accurately. Also, the creation of the modern state of Israel, reviving the Jewish state, after almost 1,900 years of being dispersed among the nations, is an exceptional fact and without comparison in the history of humanity.

Q: Has the vision of the Jewish world about Jesus Christ and about the Church changed?

Fontana: Very slowly but surely, the Jewish world is changing its perception of the Catholic Church. The visit of Pope John Paul II to Israel and his gesture of praying at the Wailing Wall were fundamental, leaving there a beautiful prayer: “God of our Fathers, you chose Abraham and his descendants, to bring Your Name to the nations. We are deeply sorry for sharing in that curse of history that caused suffering for your sons and we ask your forgiveness. We desire an authentic fraternity with the people of the Covenant.” This was a very important sign in the eyes of the Jewish people.

On the part of Judaism, it does not have a centralized authority like the figure of the Pope in the Catholic Church, there are many voices and at times these are discordant, but there was published in 2002 a manifesto signed by 150 rabbis titled “Dabru Emet” — To Speak the Truth. In it they recognize the change brought about by the Catholic Church and encouraged everyone to follow on this path of reconciliation and cooperation between Jews and Christians.

Q: Has the vision of Catholics about the Jewish world changed?

Fontana: In the Catholic Church it is also changing, however very slowly because the Catholic Church is very large and a change of direction cannot be brusque. On the part of the hierarchy they have published many official documents, which settle the doctrinal position of the Church.

The primary one is the Second Vatican Council declaration “Nostra Aetate” and the complementary documents “Orientations and Suggestions for the Application of the Conciliar Decree ‘Nostra Aetate’” and “Notes on the Correct Way to Present the Jews and Judaism in Preaching and Catechesis in the Catholic Church.” With these, the Catholic Church fixes its current position faced to the Jewish people. In fact, there is a Pontifical Commission for Religious Relations With the Jews.

But one thing is the official documents and the other is the reality up to which the faithful, the change is very slow but is already being taken, there is more and more interest by the Catholic faithful in knowing things about the Jews and getting along well with them. The Catholics are taking into account the fact that the Jews are a people who pray, who hang onto their faith, who maintain their traditions — an example in these times of secularization. “Our older bothers in the faith,” as John Paul II said.

Q: At what point is the dialogue and what are its perspectives?

Fontana: Currently the ice has been broken, there is no environment of hostility and there are desires to meet and even to cooperate on specific themes. There are projects of international assistance for the needy, Caritas and similar Jewish institutions, in countries of Africa, for example.

But there are goals to reach: referring to Judeo-Christian dialogue, a theological dialogue has not yet been entered into in-depth. We say that we are in the phase of greeting them and speaking about topics that do not produce frictions. The figure of Jesus Christ in his significance for Christians is difficult to approach for the Jews, just as the topic of the precepts of the Law of Moses is for Christians.

But yes, there are that could be talked about — creation, the fall, redemption, the figure of the Messiah and the interpretations of each religion, in the aspects in which they are common and in which they disagree.

Everything else is a task for the future.

http://www.zenit.org/article-21892?l=english

Also see:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/opus-judei.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2008/02/opus-dei-hebrew-catholic-connection.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/07/opus-judei-founder-escriba-preached.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/vatican-lesson-on-shekinah.html

Interview With a Judaizer from Valencia

February 26, 2008

St. Vincent Ferrer of Valencia is said to have converted tens of thousands of Jews to the Christian faith by his preaching in the early 15th century. Nevertheless, the city has always had more than its share of conversos. Today, Valencia is an “Opus Dei” hotbed. It’s said that “Opus Dei” aggressively recruits doctors, lawyers, judges, government officials, and those who hold high positions in finance. Is the Judaizing neurosurgeon from Valencia interviewed below an “Opus Dei” member? His “work” suggests so. Of course, it wouldn’t be necessary to speculate if “Opus Dei” wasn’t a secret society.

More Catholics Interested in Jewish World

Interview With President of Valencia’s Judeo-Christian Friendship

By Inmaculada Álvarez

VALENCIA, Spain, FEB. 25, 2008 (Zenit.org).- More and more Catholics are taking an interest in the Jewish world, our “older brothers in the faith,” said the president and founder of the association Judeo-Christian Friendship of Valencia.

Francisco Fontana Tormo, a Catholic and neurosurgeon, received in November from the Parliament of Israel the Samuel Toledano Prize for his contribution to the dialogue between Jews and Christians.

In this interview with ZENIT, Fontana speaks of his work and association, and the status of Jewish-Christian relations.

Q: In what does this recognition consist and what has it involved for you?

Fontana: The Samuel Toledano Prize was instituted by the Toledano family in memory of Samuel Toledano, leader of the Jewish community of Madrid, who died in 1996. The prize is given annually to two researchers, one Israeli and the other Spanish, for a research work about the Jewish past in Spain, for the relations between Spain and Israel and for the relationships between Jews, Christians and Muslims.

Occasionally one is given a diploma of recognition for work, not research but activity, in the context of these areas. In this case, I have been given a diploma for my activities in promoting the mutual knowledge between Judaism and Christianity and maintaining good relations between both religions, as president and founder of the Judeo-Christian Friendship of Valencia.

For me it has implied great joy for what involves the recognition on the part of Jews for the Judeo-Christian relationship, and on the other hand, a deep emotion, since it was given to me by Isaac Navon, fifth president of Israel, in Kneset, the Parliament of Israel, and as well was an opportunity to travel again to Israel.

Q: What is the basis upon which the dialogue between Jews and Christians sits?

Fontana: We have a very similar concept on basic questions of morals and beliefs. There are many points in common: the importance of religion for personal and community life, the basic dignity of being human, created in the image and likeness of God, God as giver of the Ten Commandments, a salvation history which begins with Abraham, father of the believing.

We have the Bible in common. The Old Testament — or Hebrew Talmud — is contained in the Christian Bible. The Church has always been considered implanted into the ancient Israel. “If the root is holy, so are the branches. You […] were grafted in their place to share the richness of the olive tree.” (Romans 11:16-17).

Q: How has the Holocaust influenced this dialogue?

Fontana: The Holocaust has been determinant for Christianity to reopen its relationship with the Jewish people. The extermination of six million Jews during World War II has provoked the Christian Churches to ask themselves for their degree of responsibility in such a sizeable catastrophe, and whether or not an anti-Jewish Christianity had been a breeding ground for the Nazi persecution.

The Church has published a document, “We Remember; a Reflection on the Holocaust.” It has been like a veil has been lifted. The Catholic Church has taken into account that God does not break the Covenant with his people — the Covenant was never abolished, as it is said very accurately. Also, the creation of the modern state of Israel, reviving the Jewish state, after almost 1,900 years of being dispersed among the nations, is an exceptional fact and without comparison in the history of humanity.

Q: Has the vision of the Jewish world about Jesus Christ and about the Church changed?

Fontana: Very slowly but surely, the Jewish world is changing its perception of the Catholic Church. The visit of Pope John Paul II to Israel and his gesture of praying at the Wailing Wall were fundamental, leaving there a beautiful prayer: “God of our Fathers, you chose Abraham and his descendants, to bring Your Name to the nations. We are deeply sorry for sharing in that curse of history that caused suffering for your sons and we ask your forgiveness. We desire an authentic fraternity with the people of the Covenant.” This was a very important sign in the eyes of the Jewish people.

On the part of Judaism, it does not have a centralized authority like the figure of the Pope in the Catholic Church, there are many voices and at times these are discordant, but there was published in 2002 a manifesto signed by 150 rabbis titled “Dabru Emet” — To Speak the Truth. In it they recognize the change brought about by the Catholic Church and encouraged everyone to follow on this path of reconciliation and cooperation between Jews and Christians.

Q: Has the vision of Catholics about the Jewish world changed?

Fontana: In the Catholic Church it is also changing, however very slowly because the Catholic Church is very large and a change of direction cannot be brusque. On the part of the hierarchy they have published many official documents, which settle the doctrinal position of the Church.

The primary one is the Second Vatican Council declaration “Nostra Aetate” and the complementary documents “Orientations and Suggestions for the Application of the Conciliar Decree ‘Nostra Aetate’” and “Notes on the Correct Way to Present the Jews and Judaism in Preaching and Catechesis in the Catholic Church.” With these, the Catholic Church fixes its current position faced to the Jewish people. In fact, there is a Pontifical Commission for Religious Relations With the Jews.

But one thing is the official documents and the other is the reality up to which the faithful, the change is very slow but is already being taken, there is more and more interest by the Catholic faithful in knowing things about the Jews and getting along well with them. The Catholics are taking into account the fact that the Jews are a people who pray, who hang onto their faith, who maintain their traditions — an example in these times of secularization. “Our older bothers in the faith,” as John Paul II said.

Q: At what point is the dialogue and what are its perspectives?

Fontana: Currently the ice has been broken, there is no environment of hostility and there are desires to meet and even to cooperate on specific themes. There are projects of international assistance for the needy, Caritas and similar Jewish institutions, in countries of Africa, for example.

But there are goals to reach: referring to Judeo-Christian dialogue, a theological dialogue has not yet been entered into in-depth. We say that we are in the phase of greeting them and speaking about topics that do not produce frictions. The figure of Jesus Christ in his significance for Christians is difficult to approach for the Jews, just as the topic of the precepts of the Law of Moses is for Christians.

But yes, there are that could be talked about — creation, the fall, redemption, the figure of the Messiah and the interpretations of each religion, in the aspects in which they are common and in which they disagree.

Everything else is a task for the future.

http://www.zenit.org/article-21892?l=english

Also see:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/opus-judei.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2008/02/opus-dei-hebrew-catholic-connection.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/07/opus-judei-founder-escriba-preached.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/vatican-lesson-on-shekinah.html