Archive for the ‘Kol Nidre’ Category

Judaic ‘Repentance’ Voodoo 2012/5773

September 27, 2012

“This is my exchange, this is my substitute, this is my expiation. This chicken shall go to death and I shall proceed to a good, long life and peace.”

Judaism’s version of repentance: An infant has its ‘sins transferred’ to a chicken

Pope Greets His Brother Rabbis for their Lying, Voodoo Holidays

October 4, 2011
Lying (HERE), Voodoo (HERE, HERE) Judaism which the Pope wants to draw you closer to. Pope Benedict’s brother Rabbi Di Segni, inter alia,  republished the “Toledoth Jeshu” which makes a mockery of Jesus Christ who the Pope claims to represent.

Pope Offers Rosh Hashanah Greetings

JTA

October 02, 2011

Pope Benedict XVI sent out a High Holidays message auguring peace, justice and friendship in the Jewish New Year.

In a message addressed to Rome’s chief rabbi, [and liar] Riccardo Di Segni, the pope expressed his hope that “these important feasts may be an occasion for many blessings from on high, and a source of infinite grace.”

The pope added, “May the desire grow in all of us to promote justice and peace in the world, which has great need of authentic witnesses of truth. May God in his goodness protect the Jewish community and allow us to deepen our friendship, both here in Rome and all over the world.”

http://www.forward.com/articles/143757/

Synod’s Rabbi Speaks

September 26, 2008

I don’t take it as a coincidence that this Ashkenazic [Khazar] Chief Rabbi of Haifa, Rabbi “Cohen” has been specifically selected by Benedict to teach the bishops how to more effectively nullify scripture at the upcoming synod on the day before Yom Kippur Eve. This Rabbi “Cohen” likely believes himself to be a genetic descendant of Aaron, and the bishops probably subscribe to this delusion as well. Yom Kippur Eve is the time of the yearly Orthodox Judaic attempt to deceive God and men through nullification of vows in the Kol Nidre rite (Judaism Discovered pp. 965-980). Perhaps that will be the bishops’ lesson for the day, and perhaps they will also learn the proper way to transfer their sins to a chicken, like the “elder brothers in the faith” do on Yom Kippur Eve HERE and HERE. Maybe the rabbi will let the bishops in on some of the more arcane Yom Kippur phallic obsession traditions and teach them how to “rectify the brit” HERE There are countless asinine teachings the rabbi could share with the bishops as a means of rendering them utterly alien from the law and the prophets as rabbis effectively do to their followers, as Pope Innocent IV said of them HERE. Most likely, he would be speaking on the so-called “Noahide laws.”

Israeli rabbi calls Vatican invitation to address synod sign of hope

By Judith Sudilovsky
Catholic News Service

JERUSALEM (CNS) — The Vatican invitation to participate in the upcoming world Synod of Bishops on the Bible is a “signal of hope,” said Israeli Rabbi Shear-Yashuv Cohen, who will lead a one-day discussion on the Jewish interpretation of the Scriptures.

Rabbi Cohen, co-chairman of the Israeli-Vatican dialogue commission and chief rabbi of Haifa, is the first non-Christian ever invited to address the world Synod of Bishops. He will speak the second day of the Oct. 5-26 synod at the Vatican.

“(The invitation) brings with it a message of love, coexistence and peace for generations,” Rabbi Cohen told Catholic News Service in an interview in his Jerusalem office in late September. “We see in (the) invitation a kind of declaration that (the church) intends to continue with the policy and doctrine established by Pope John XXIII and Pope John Paul II, and we appreciate very deeply this declaration.”

Despite the history of violence and bloodshed from the Christian world, said Rabbi Cohen, the invitation can also be seen as a declaration of “respect and coexistence with Judaism as the older brother of Christianity.”

He said he actually felt a bit of trepidation in accepting the invitation because some rabbinical leaders feel that interreligious dialogue is simply another way of trying to convince Jews to become Christians, and some Jewish leaders opposed his addressing the synod.

“There is an extreme group that is afraid and who say that, since (Christians) didn’t succeed by force to convert us, they are trying now to do it by talking; they call it the kiss of death,” said Rabbi Cohen. “If they are right, I am making a mistake, but I believe that is not the situation.”

The rabbi said he sees the invitation as a partial fulfillment of an ancient daily prayer that seeks a day when all people will join together to worship God.

Rabbi Cohen noted Christianity, Islam and Judaism are Abrahamic faiths that believe in one God.

“You can’t deny the fact that, despite the difference in opinion, the roots are the same. They start from Abraham, and we can call these three religions the Abrahamic faiths. We all continue the sanctity and loyalty to the Bible,” he said.

Rabbi Cohen — the 18th generation of a family of rabbis and biblical scholars — said he will speak to the synod about the centrality of the Jewish Scripture in Jewish tradition and daily life and the importance of it in the education of every Jewish child, as well as its importance to Israel. He gave the example of a yearly Bible quiz, which is broadcast nationally and whose winners are congratulated by the Israeli president.

“I believe that is what should be copied by all nations of the world. They should learn the Bible and know it and be inspired by it,” he said.

He said he was able to recite almost the entire Torah — the first five books of the Bible — by the time he was 8 years old.

Rabbis use biblical quotations and their rabbinical interpretations to relate to contemporary issues when they must make a religious ruling, he said.

“The Tanach, the Torah, is indeed a central part of our (prayer) service and the very symbolic fact that in every synagogue we face the (Holy) Ark, which contains the written scrolls of the books of Moses and the prophets,” shows its importance, said Rabbi Cohen. “We pray (toward) the book, not to God; there is no image of God or icons. We put in our Holy Ark the words of God. That is how central the Scriptures are in our lives.”

In the years following the 2001 Vatican document “The Jewish People and Their Sacred Scriptures in the Christian Bible,” Rabbi Cohen has noticed a growing interest in learning about the Jewish Scriptures, what Christians know as the Old Testament. He said he has hosted several groups of Catholic religious who asked him questions about the Scriptures.

“I asked them if they could forget the fact that not only Jesus but all the apostles were Jewish, so instead of hating those Jews that are accused of having killed Christ, think about the fact that the victims were also Jews,” said Rabbi Cohen. “I believe that is part of the Jewish persecution that happened through generations by other people. That is part of our destiny, but Christians should realize that and respect those who continue to live as the Jews (lived) in the time of the founding of Christianity.”

Jewish survival throughout centuries of hatred and persecution “is a sign that despite all the difficulty God wants us to exist and to continue the way we were,” said Rabbi Cohen.

He said interreligious dialogue acts as a block to the spreading of the anti-Jewish and anti-Semitic sentiment of the past, without which the Holocaust could not have taken place.

While there may not be room for Scripture scholarship between Jews and Christians because of the different conclusions both reach from the readings, such discussions might be possible on a scientific level at academic institutions, he said.

“I believe we should leave each to his own tradition and not try to blur the differences,” said Rabbi Cohen. “One part of every dialogue is not only to speak to each other but also to listen to each other and respect his right to be different. We can’t expect Christians to do that for us if we don’t do that for them.”

http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/0804849.htm

also see:

Rabbi to Lead Synod Discussion on Interpretation of Scripture

Synod on Scripture 3 Months Away

Synod’s Rabbi Speaks

September 26, 2008

I don’t take it as a coincidence that this Ashkenazic [Khazar] Chief Rabbi of Haifa, Rabbi “Cohen” has been specifically selected by Benedict to teach the bishops how to more effectively nullify scripture at the upcoming synod on the day before Yom Kippur Eve. This Rabbi “Cohen” likely believes himself to be a genetic descendant of Aaron, and the bishops probably subscribe to this delusion as well. Yom Kippur Eve is the time of the yearly Orthodox Judaic attempt to deceive God and men through nullification of vows in the Kol Nidre rite (Judaism Discovered pp. 965-980). Perhaps that will be the bishops’ lesson for the day, and perhaps they will also learn the proper way to transfer their sins to a chicken, like the “elder brothers in the faith” do on Yom Kippur Eve HERE and HERE. Maybe the rabbi will let the bishops in on some of the more arcane Yom Kippur phallic obsession traditions and teach them how to “rectify the brit” HERE There are countless asinine teachings the rabbi could share with the bishops as a means of rendering them utterly alien from the law and the prophets as rabbis effectively do to their followers, as Pope Innocent IV said of them HERE. Most likely, he would be speaking on the so-called “Noahide laws.”

Israeli rabbi calls Vatican invitation to address synod sign of hope

By Judith Sudilovsky
Catholic News Service

JERUSALEM (CNS) — The Vatican invitation to participate in the upcoming world Synod of Bishops on the Bible is a “signal of hope,” said Israeli Rabbi Shear-Yashuv Cohen, who will lead a one-day discussion on the Jewish interpretation of the Scriptures.

Rabbi Cohen, co-chairman of the Israeli-Vatican dialogue commission and chief rabbi of Haifa, is the first non-Christian ever invited to address the world Synod of Bishops. He will speak the second day of the Oct. 5-26 synod at the Vatican.

“(The invitation) brings with it a message of love, coexistence and peace for generations,” Rabbi Cohen told Catholic News Service in an interview in his Jerusalem office in late September. “We see in (the) invitation a kind of declaration that (the church) intends to continue with the policy and doctrine established by Pope John XXIII and Pope John Paul II, and we appreciate very deeply this declaration.”

Despite the history of violence and bloodshed from the Christian world, said Rabbi Cohen, the invitation can also be seen as a declaration of “respect and coexistence with Judaism as the older brother of Christianity.”

He said he actually felt a bit of trepidation in accepting the invitation because some rabbinical leaders feel that interreligious dialogue is simply another way of trying to convince Jews to become Christians, and some Jewish leaders opposed his addressing the synod.

“There is an extreme group that is afraid and who say that, since (Christians) didn’t succeed by force to convert us, they are trying now to do it by talking; they call it the kiss of death,” said Rabbi Cohen. “If they are right, I am making a mistake, but I believe that is not the situation.”

The rabbi said he sees the invitation as a partial fulfillment of an ancient daily prayer that seeks a day when all people will join together to worship God.

Rabbi Cohen noted Christianity, Islam and Judaism are Abrahamic faiths that believe in one God.

“You can’t deny the fact that, despite the difference in opinion, the roots are the same. They start from Abraham, and we can call these three religions the Abrahamic faiths. We all continue the sanctity and loyalty to the Bible,” he said.

Rabbi Cohen — the 18th generation of a family of rabbis and biblical scholars — said he will speak to the synod about the centrality of the Jewish Scripture in Jewish tradition and daily life and the importance of it in the education of every Jewish child, as well as its importance to Israel. He gave the example of a yearly Bible quiz, which is broadcast nationally and whose winners are congratulated by the Israeli president.

“I believe that is what should be copied by all nations of the world. They should learn the Bible and know it and be inspired by it,” he said.

He said he was able to recite almost the entire Torah — the first five books of the Bible — by the time he was 8 years old.

Rabbis use biblical quotations and their rabbinical interpretations to relate to contemporary issues when they must make a religious ruling, he said.

“The Tanach, the Torah, is indeed a central part of our (prayer) service and the very symbolic fact that in every synagogue we face the (Holy) Ark, which contains the written scrolls of the books of Moses and the prophets,” shows its importance, said Rabbi Cohen. “We pray (toward) the book, not to God; there is no image of God or icons. We put in our Holy Ark the words of God. That is how central the Scriptures are in our lives.”

In the years following the 2001 Vatican document “The Jewish People and Their Sacred Scriptures in the Christian Bible,” Rabbi Cohen has noticed a growing interest in learning about the Jewish Scriptures, what Christians know as the Old Testament. He said he has hosted several groups of Catholic religious who asked him questions about the Scriptures.

“I asked them if they could forget the fact that not only Jesus but all the apostles were Jewish, so instead of hating those Jews that are accused of having killed Christ, think about the fact that the victims were also Jews,” said Rabbi Cohen. “I believe that is part of the Jewish persecution that happened through generations by other people. That is part of our destiny, but Christians should realize that and respect those who continue to live as the Jews (lived) in the time of the founding of Christianity.”

Jewish survival throughout centuries of hatred and persecution “is a sign that despite all the difficulty God wants us to exist and to continue the way we were,” said Rabbi Cohen.

He said interreligious dialogue acts as a block to the spreading of the anti-Jewish and anti-Semitic sentiment of the past, without which the Holocaust could not have taken place.

While there may not be room for Scripture scholarship between Jews and Christians because of the different conclusions both reach from the readings, such discussions might be possible on a scientific level at academic institutions, he said.

“I believe we should leave each to his own tradition and not try to blur the differences,” said Rabbi Cohen. “One part of every dialogue is not only to speak to each other but also to listen to each other and respect his right to be different. We can’t expect Christians to do that for us if we don’t do that for them.”

http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/0804849.htm

also see:

Rabbi to Lead Synod Discussion on Interpretation of Scripture

Synod on Scripture 3 Months Away

Bush Nominates Kol Nidre Upholding Talmudist for Attorney General

September 17, 2007

Watch this guy sail through Congress. Will he be sworn in with his hand on the lying Talmud?


President Bush nominated an Orthodox Jew to be U.S. attorney general.

Michael Mukasey, a retired federal judge from New York, is a conservative who has criticized Bush administration policies that have kept detainees from consulting with lawyers.

Democrats have praised Mukasey, and his selection represents a shift from Bush’s combative defense of the most recent attorney general, Alberto Gonzales, who resigned last month.

Mukasey’s Jewishness became an issue when a defendant in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing filed a motion to remove the judge, arguing that his allegiances to fellow Jews and Israel would create a bias against Muslim defendants. The motion was dismissed as “utterly irrelevant.”

Mukasey’s wife, Susan, is a former headmistress of the Ramaz Lower School, an Orthodox Jewish school in New York City.

If confirmed, Mukasey would be the second Jewish attorney general. The first, Ed Levi, served under President Ford.

http://www.jta.org/cgi-bin/iowa/breaking/104180.html

Mukasey gave a lecture on the Kol Nidre in September of 2004:

Sun, Sep 19, 3 pm, $35

KOL NIDRE THROUGH THE AGES — Concert

This program explores the music and meaning of the holiest prayer in the Jewish liturgy, the Kol Nidre. Recited on the eve of Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement, observed this year on September 25), the Kol Nidre has inspired numerous musical settings and instrumental compositions … The Honorable MICHAEL B. MUKASEY, U.S. District Court Chief Judge, provides the legal perspective … Although it carries tremendous emotional power, the Kol Nidre is essentially a legal text that absolves Jews of promises they may have made during the previous year.

http://www.92y.org/content/celebrate_350_releases.asp

The above description of the Kol Nidre (all vows) declaration is more forthcoming than usual, but it is still not correct. The Kol Nidre also “absolves” Judaics of all future vows they will make in the upcoming year.

Americans should have serious concerns about Bush’s appointee, a man whose “religion” grants him permission to take an oath that he has no intention of upholding.

If Mukasey is approved by the Congress he will be sworn into office by taking the following oath:

“I (name), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.”

But the Kol Nidre declaration that Mukasey, as a pious Orthodox Judaic, will recite on Yom Kippur this Friday evening, September 21, 2007, will “absolve” him from the responsibility of upholding his oath of office and indeed, any promise he makes at all for the entire year.

Here is the Kol Nidre declaration (in English) that Mukasey along with all of his fellow Orthodox Judaics will recite this Friday:

“All vows, obligations, oaths, and anathemas, whether called ‘ḳonam,’ ‘ḳonas,’ or by any other name, which we may vow, or swear, or pledge, or whereby we may be bound, from this Day of Atonement until the next (whose happy coming we await), we do repent. May they be deemed absolved, forgiven, annulled, and void, and made of no effect; they shall not bind us nor have power over us. The vows shall not be reckoned vows; the obligations shall not be obligatory; nor the oaths be oaths.”

Now, it is common to hear the excuse made that this declaration was created as a reaction to forced conversions in medieval Europe. This is patently false. The Encyclopedia Judaica finds the Kol Nidre existing before the eighth century:

The first reference to Kol Nidrei as a collective declaration is found in the responsa of the Babylonian geonim (beginning in the eighth century). It is stated that Kol Nidrei was familiar to them from “other lands … (Encyclopedia Judaica, “Kol Nidrei”)

However, the Talmudic precedent for the Kol Nidre dates from the early centuries A.D.:

And he who desires that none of his vows made during the year shall be valid, let him stand at the beginning of the year and declare, ‘Every vow which I may make in the future shall be null.1 [HIS VOWS ARE THEN INVALID,] PROVIDING THAT HE REMEMBERS THIS AT THE TIME OF THE VOW. (Soncino Babylonian Talmud, Nedarim 23b)

How does the Kol Nidre square with the oath that all federal employees must take supplied above?

How does the Kol Nidre of these “elder brothers in the faith” of the Vatican prelates square with God’s law:

You shall not lie, neither shall any man deceive his neighbour. Thou shalt not swear falsely by my name … (Leviticus 19;11,12)

The answer, quite simply, is that it doesn’t. Not by any stretch of the imagination.

Bush Nominates Kol Nidre Upholding Talmudist for Attorney General

September 17, 2007

Watch this guy sail through Congress. Will he be sworn in with his hand on the lying Talmud?


President Bush nominated an Orthodox Jew to be U.S. attorney general.

Michael Mukasey, a retired federal judge from New York, is a conservative who has criticized Bush administration policies that have kept detainees from consulting with lawyers.

Democrats have praised Mukasey, and his selection represents a shift from Bush’s combative defense of the most recent attorney general, Alberto Gonzales, who resigned last month.

Mukasey’s Jewishness became an issue when a defendant in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing filed a motion to remove the judge, arguing that his allegiances to fellow Jews and Israel would create a bias against Muslim defendants. The motion was dismissed as “utterly irrelevant.”

Mukasey’s wife, Susan, is a former headmistress of the Ramaz Lower School, an Orthodox Jewish school in New York City.

If confirmed, Mukasey would be the second Jewish attorney general. The first, Ed Levi, served under President Ford.

http://www.jta.org/cgi-bin/iowa/breaking/104180.html

Mukasey gave a lecture on the Kol Nidre in September of 2004:

Sun, Sep 19, 3 pm, $35

KOL NIDRE THROUGH THE AGES — Concert

This program explores the music and meaning of the holiest prayer in the Jewish liturgy, the Kol Nidre. Recited on the eve of Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement, observed this year on September 25), the Kol Nidre has inspired numerous musical settings and instrumental compositions … The Honorable MICHAEL B. MUKASEY, U.S. District Court Chief Judge, provides the legal perspective … Although it carries tremendous emotional power, the Kol Nidre is essentially a legal text that absolves Jews of promises they may have made during the previous year.

http://www.92y.org/content/celebrate_350_releases.asp

The above description of the Kol Nidre (all vows) declaration is more forthcoming than usual, but it is still not correct. The Kol Nidre also “absolves” Judaics of all future vows they will make in the upcoming year.

Americans should have serious concerns about Bush’s appointee, a man whose “religion” grants him permission to take an oath that he has no intention of upholding.

If Mukasey is approved by the Congress he will be sworn into office by taking the following oath:

“I (name), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.”

But the Kol Nidre declaration that Mukasey, as a pious Orthodox Judaic, will recite on Yom Kippur this Friday evening, September 21, 2007, will “absolve” him from the responsibility of upholding his oath of office and indeed, any promise he makes at all for the entire year.

Here is the Kol Nidre declaration (in English) that Mukasey along with all of his fellow Orthodox Judaics will recite this Friday:

“All vows, obligations, oaths, and anathemas, whether called ‘ḳonam,’ ‘ḳonas,’ or by any other name, which we may vow, or swear, or pledge, or whereby we may be bound, from this Day of Atonement until the next (whose happy coming we await), we do repent. May they be deemed absolved, forgiven, annulled, and void, and made of no effect; they shall not bind us nor have power over us. The vows shall not be reckoned vows; the obligations shall not be obligatory; nor the oaths be oaths.”

Now, it is common to hear the excuse made that this declaration was created as a reaction to forced conversions in medieval Europe. This is patently false. The Encyclopedia Judaica finds the Kol Nidre existing before the eighth century:

The first reference to Kol Nidrei as a collective declaration is found in the responsa of the Babylonian geonim (beginning in the eighth century). It is stated that Kol Nidrei was familiar to them from “other lands … (Encyclopedia Judaica, “Kol Nidrei”)

However, the Talmudic precedent for the Kol Nidre dates from the early centuries A.D.:

And he who desires that none of his vows made during the year shall be valid, let him stand at the beginning of the year and declare, ‘Every vow which I may make in the future shall be null.1 [HIS VOWS ARE THEN INVALID,] PROVIDING THAT HE REMEMBERS THIS AT THE TIME OF THE VOW. (Soncino Babylonian Talmud, Nedarim 23b)

How does the Kol Nidre square with the oath that all federal employees must take supplied above?

How does the Kol Nidre of these “elder brothers in the faith” of the Vatican prelates square with God’s law:

You shall not lie, neither shall any man deceive his neighbour. Thou shalt not swear falsely by my name … (Leviticus 19;11,12)

The answer, quite simply, is that it doesn’t. Not by any stretch of the imagination.