Archive for the ‘holocaust theology’ Category

Priest, Rabbi Ask, “Did God Survive the Holocaust?”

November 22, 2009

Heaven, earth and God Himself may pass away, but “The Holocaust” shall not pass away. (Gospel of Wiesel 21;33)

Fr. John T. Pawlikowski, apparently a disciple of Elie Wiesel, was the topic of the last blog entry, ‘Shoah’ Theologian Reveals Hermetic/Kabbalistic Doctrine at Core of Holocaustolatry.

Jewish and Catholic leaders to discuss God and the Holocaust

November 21, 2009

A challenging dialogue concerning God and the Holocaust will be discussed by Jewish and Roman Catholic leaders on Monday, at the Eastern Michigan University Student Ballroom at 7 p.m. The public is invited to attend this free event.

Dr. Guy Stern, Ph.D., director of the International Institute of the Righteous of the Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Family Campus in Farmington Hills will discuss a Jewish point of view. This year, the Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Family Campus celebrates its 25th anniversary as America’s first freestanding museum dedicated to the memory of the Holocaust. The International Institute of the Righteous honors the thousands of non-Jews who saved or attempted to save at least one Jew, with the knowledge that they were putting themselves in danger by doing so. As is quoted on the museum’s Web site, “As it said in the Talmud: ‘When someone saves a life, it is as if that person had saved the whole world.’” [This falsification is set straight HERE, MP.]

… Father John T. Pawlikowski, OSM, Ph.D., will represent the Catholic perspective in the dialogue. A professor of social ethics at the Catholic Theological Union and director of the Catholic-Jewish Studies Program at the Catholic Theological Union’s Cardinal Joseph Bernadin Center, Fr. Pawlikowski hails from the largest Roman Catholic Graduate School of Theology and Ministry in the U.S.

The Jewish/Catholic conversation, entitled “Did God Survive the Holocaust,” will be presented by Hillel at Eastern Michigan University and by Holy Trinity Catholic Student Parish. The moderator of the dialogue will be Dr Martin Schichtman, professor of English, and co-sponsored by the Division of Academic Affairs; the College of Arts and Sciences; the Department of Communication; the Media and Theater Arts; the Department of History and Philosphy; the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminology; and the Department of World Languages.

The Eastern Michigan University Student Center Ballroom is located at 900 Oakwood in Ypsilanti, Mich. For more information, call (734) 740-2885.

http://www.annarbor.com/faith/jewish-and-catholic-leaders-to-discuss-god-and-the-holocaust/

Lansdale Catholic High School Wins "Generous, Coveted Prize" for Excellence in Holocaustolatry

July 2, 2009

The Noahide faith is strong at this formerly Catholic High School.

Holocaust Arts Contest as a Way to Teach Tolerance

July 02, 2009

Lynn B. Edelman – Jewish Federation Feature

Eileen Hildenbrand, chairperson of the English Department at Lansdale Catholic High School, expressed her delight at learning that her school will soon receive a coveted prize from the sponsors of the recent Mordechai Anielewicz Creative Arts Competition on the Holocaust — the Clara Isaacman Memorial Holocaust Trunk: “This generous gift, valued at more than $1,500, will provide our students with a wealth of Holocaust educational materials that we did not currently have, and will be utilized by our students in a variety of subjects.”

Hildenbrand explained that the Holocaust is explored through the prism of many subject areas at the school, including English, social studies and theology.

“It is an important topic for our students, who are not only United States citizens, but also citizens of the world,” she said, adding that “since we are a Catholic school, our students need to learn about other groups.”

Hildenbrand said she hopes that this knowledge will help to promote tolerance, understanding and respect for others.

She also said that she believes the motto so closely associated with Holocaust education — “Remember not to forget” — has great relevance in today’s society.

“Genocide is a current problem in many parts of the world; perhaps we can learn from the past how to address this issue today,” she pondered.

This is the third time Hildenbrand’s students have been honored by the competition’s judges.

“We encourage our students to enter because it is through the arts that students can explore and express their feelings,” she said.

Students in her English I class created commemorative postage stamps to honor those lost in the Holocaust and/or those Righteous Gentiles who acted to prevent the loss of Jewish lives.

Hildenbrand emphasized that “the role of the Righteous Gentile [see: Noahide] is especially relevant for our students.”

This project was the culminating activity in the students’ exploration of the Holocaust. In preparation, they read The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank and Number the Stars by Lois Lowry. Seniors viewed the movie “Schindler’s List,” while freshmen saw “Miracle at Midnight” to emphasize the role that many Christians played in saving friends and neighbors from the hands of the Nazis.

To help these young people understand the concept of 6 million Holocaust victims, several student groups also saw “Paper Clips,” a movie that documented one school’s project to collect one paper clip for each Jewish life lost.

Hildenbrand’s colleague, Elizabeth Burgoon, helped her senior class to create scrapbooks that marked the lives of various fictional people who lived during the Holocaust through letters and pictures. To prepare for this competition entry, students read Night by Elie Weisel and The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, a book by Irish novelist John Boyne that was recently made into an award-winning movie.

Throughout the course of their school experience, the Catholic students will have much exposures to Holocaust studies, as well as ample opportunity for discussion. Said Hildenbrand: “We are trying to help them gain knowledge about a very dark period in history and learn from the past how to create a better world.”

The multimedia entries from Lansdale Catholic High School students and other competition participants were displayed from June 3 through June 15 at the Moore College of Art & Design.

Award winners were honored during a ceremony at the college on June 8.

The Mordechai Anielewicz Creative Arts Competition, now in its 36th year, provides students in grades seven to 12, of all religious and ethnic backgrounds, with a chance to respond to the Holocaust and its related issues through creative expression. Students are encouraged to submit original written, musical, art, film and creative dance works that focus on Holocaust themes.

The contest is sponsored by the Memorial Committee for the Six Million Jewish Martyrs of the Jewish Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia and the Auerbach Central Agency for Jewish Education, in cooperation with the Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, Sons and Daughters of Holocaust Survivors, Children of Jewish Holocaust Survivors Association of Philadelphia, Samuel Pelta Holocaust Education Endowment, Jewish Publication Society and Moore College of Art & Design. It is named in honor of Mordechai Anielewicz, the 19-year-old leader of the Jewish revolt against the Nazis in the Warsaw ghetto.

For more information, call Beth Razin at Federation: 215-832-0536 (e-mail: brazin@jfgp.org).

http://www.jewishexponent.com/article/19151/

Lansdale Catholic High School Wins "Generous, Coveted Prize" for Excellence in Holocaustolatry

July 2, 2009

The Noahide faith is strong at this formerly Catholic High School.

Holocaust Arts Contest as a Way to Teach Tolerance

July 02, 2009

Lynn B. Edelman – Jewish Federation Feature

Eileen Hildenbrand, chairperson of the English Department at Lansdale Catholic High School, expressed her delight at learning that her school will soon receive a coveted prize from the sponsors of the recent Mordechai Anielewicz Creative Arts Competition on the Holocaust — the Clara Isaacman Memorial Holocaust Trunk: “This generous gift, valued at more than $1,500, will provide our students with a wealth of Holocaust educational materials that we did not currently have, and will be utilized by our students in a variety of subjects.”

Hildenbrand explained that the Holocaust is explored through the prism of many subject areas at the school, including English, social studies and theology.

“It is an important topic for our students, who are not only United States citizens, but also citizens of the world,” she said, adding that “since we are a Catholic school, our students need to learn about other groups.”

Hildenbrand said she hopes that this knowledge will help to promote tolerance, understanding and respect for others.

She also said that she believes the motto so closely associated with Holocaust education — “Remember not to forget” — has great relevance in today’s society.

“Genocide is a current problem in many parts of the world; perhaps we can learn from the past how to address this issue today,” she pondered.

This is the third time Hildenbrand’s students have been honored by the competition’s judges.

“We encourage our students to enter because it is through the arts that students can explore and express their feelings,” she said.

Students in her English I class created commemorative postage stamps to honor those lost in the Holocaust and/or those Righteous Gentiles who acted to prevent the loss of Jewish lives.

Hildenbrand emphasized that “the role of the Righteous Gentile [see: Noahide] is especially relevant for our students.”

This project was the culminating activity in the students’ exploration of the Holocaust. In preparation, they read The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank and Number the Stars by Lois Lowry. Seniors viewed the movie “Schindler’s List,” while freshmen saw “Miracle at Midnight” to emphasize the role that many Christians played in saving friends and neighbors from the hands of the Nazis.

To help these young people understand the concept of 6 million Holocaust victims, several student groups also saw “Paper Clips,” a movie that documented one school’s project to collect one paper clip for each Jewish life lost.

Hildenbrand’s colleague, Elizabeth Burgoon, helped her senior class to create scrapbooks that marked the lives of various fictional people who lived during the Holocaust through letters and pictures. To prepare for this competition entry, students read Night by Elie Weisel and The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, a book by Irish novelist John Boyne that was recently made into an award-winning movie.

Throughout the course of their school experience, the Catholic students will have much exposures to Holocaust studies, as well as ample opportunity for discussion. Said Hildenbrand: “We are trying to help them gain knowledge about a very dark period in history and learn from the past how to create a better world.”

The multimedia entries from Lansdale Catholic High School students and other competition participants were displayed from June 3 through June 15 at the Moore College of Art & Design.

Award winners were honored during a ceremony at the college on June 8.

The Mordechai Anielewicz Creative Arts Competition, now in its 36th year, provides students in grades seven to 12, of all religious and ethnic backgrounds, with a chance to respond to the Holocaust and its related issues through creative expression. Students are encouraged to submit original written, musical, art, film and creative dance works that focus on Holocaust themes.

The contest is sponsored by the Memorial Committee for the Six Million Jewish Martyrs of the Jewish Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia and the Auerbach Central Agency for Jewish Education, in cooperation with the Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, Sons and Daughters of Holocaust Survivors, Children of Jewish Holocaust Survivors Association of Philadelphia, Samuel Pelta Holocaust Education Endowment, Jewish Publication Society and Moore College of Art & Design. It is named in honor of Mordechai Anielewicz, the 19-year-old leader of the Jewish revolt against the Nazis in the Warsaw ghetto.

For more information, call Beth Razin at Federation: 215-832-0536 (e-mail: brazin@jfgp.org).

http://www.jewishexponent.com/article/19151/

SSPX Bp. Fellay Interview

June 1, 2009

http://www.gloria.tv/?media=27430

I remain puzzled by the fact that the Bp. Williamson “Holocaust denial” controversy continues to be framed as a mere matter of history and law by Bp. Fellay (and even Bp. Williamson himself before he was silenced) when everyone from politicians to academics to the rabbis to the bishops and even the Pope piously speaks of it in theological language.

Every Catholic is within their right and responsibility to resist the errors of “Holocaust” theology as much as any other theological error.

SSPX Bp. Fellay Interview

June 1, 2009

http://www.gloria.tv/?media=27430

I remain puzzled by the fact that the Bp. Williamson “Holocaust denial” controversy continues to be framed as a mere matter of history and law by Bp. Fellay (and even Bp. Williamson himself before he was silenced) when everyone from politicians to academics to the rabbis to the bishops and even the Pope piously speaks of it in theological language.

Every Catholic is within their right and responsibility to resist the errors of “Holocaust” theology as much as any other theological error.

"Auschwitz: Beginning of a New Era?"

April 28, 2009

I have been reading a book titled, Auschwitz: Beginning of a New Era? This is a collection of papers given at an “International Symposium on the Holocaust” held at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City, June 3 to 6, 1974. The book is edited by Eva Fleischer and published by the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine and the “Anti-Defamation League” of “B’nai B’rith.”

The title of the book should be Theological Contrivances Rationalizing Displacement of Calvary by Auschwitz to be Taught in Christian Churches and Schools because that is precisely what Catholic priests, Protestant ministers, rabbis and others including Elie Wiesel came together to synthesize at this symposium.

Gregory Baum was a Judaic (alleged) convert to Catholicism and Catholic priest, assistant to Cardinal Bea and peritus (theological advisor) at the Second Vatican Council, particularly on the three most troubling Vatican II documents, Dignitatis Humanæ, Unitatis Redintegratio and Nostra Aetate. For the moment I will focus primarily on his words because he was a priest of great influence in Rome and at the Vatican II Council.

Getting straight to business, Fr. Gregory Baum opened his talk thus:

After Auschwitz the Christian churches no longer wish to convert the Jews. While they may not be sure of the theological grounds that dispense them from this mission, the churches have become aware that asking the Jews to become Christians is a spiritual way of blotting them out of existence and thus only reinforces the effects of the Holocaust. The churches, moreover, realize the deadly irony implicit in a Christian plea for the conversion of the Jews; for after Auschwitz and the participation of the nations, it is the Christian world that is in need of conversion. The major churches have come to repudiate mission to the Jews, even if they have not justified this by adequate doctrinal explanations. We have here a case, frequently found in church history, where a practical decision on the part of the churches, in response to a significant event, precedes dogmatic reflection and in fact becomes the guide to future doctrinal development. Moved by a sense of shame over the doctrinal formulations that negate Jewish existence, the churches have come to recognize Judaism as an authentic religion before God, with independent value and meaning, not as a stage on the way to Christianity …

The new openness to Jewish faith and the emergence of a new understanding of mission reflect the response of the Christian conscience to the voice of the Holocaust … The churches believe that they have been addressed by God’s Word through these events: they have placed themselves under God’s judgment.

Fr. Baum later returns to this idea that “God’s Word” is spoken to the “Christian conscience” through “The Holocaust” and explains what is “demanded” in response to “God’s call.”

Even without elaborating an adequate dogmatic basis, they have made significant public declarations and changed the public policy in remarkable ways. Christian theologians have reflected on the new trends and tried to establish their doctrinal foundation. Christian educators have begun to rewrite catechisms and schoolbooks. Many missionary congregations and Christian-action groups have abandoned their former ideal of evangelization and adopted a new policy, according to which missionaries enter into solidarity with the people in whose midst they serve, bear the burdens of life with them, and promote the self-discovery and humanization taking place in their midst. In particular the churches have renounced the desire to convert the Jews; they have begun to call them brothers and sisters.

While these changes have taken place on the highest ecclesiastical level, in official circles and among Christians intensely involved in the problems of contemporary life, the effect of the new policy on the great majority of Christians is negligible. Most Christians have not even begun to reflect on these issues … the reason why the new policies adopted by the churches have so little power and influence among Christians is that the negation of Judaism and other religions seems to be built into the central Christian symbols. The corrections made on the margins hardly affect the central teaching. Since Christian teaching confesses Jesus as the one mediator between God and man, and the church as the true Israel, the unique vehicle of salvation, in whom the peoples of the world will find forgiveness and new life, the dangerous social trends against which the new ecclesiastical policies have reacted continue to affect the Christian understanding of history. Unless people are well informed and belong to a religious elite, the traditional language continues to shape their outlook and attitude. What is demanded, therefore, is that the churches interpret the central Christian doctrine, in obedience to God’s call, in a more socially responsible way and find a sound dogmatic basis for their new policies … (Auschwitz, Beginning of a New Era?, pp. 113, 116-117)

As we can see, Vatican II peritus Fr. Gregory Baum was not a convert to Catholicism, but rather, a subvert who sought to convert Catholics to a new religion as he stated explicitly himself: “… after Auschwitz … it is the Christian world that is in need of conversion.”

“After Auschwitz” is of course Baum’s designator for the measurement of time in the new dispensation he is operating in. As Calvary is replaced by Auschwitz in this new religion, so, Anno Domini is replaced by Anno Auschwitz. If you believe that I’m reading into his words, then listen to co-speaker Johannes Hoekendijk in his response to Baum’s paper:

“Are we anno Auschwitz 30 in a new era? That is what the theme of our colloquium suggests … After Auschwitz: The State of Israel–A New era.” (ibid p.129)

Note that Gregory Baum lamented in 1974 that while he and his comrades in Rome were inebriated on the new “Holocaust” religion that the laity in the pews hadn’t yet received the message. I imagine that he must be quite pleased with the “Holocaust” religion teaching opportunity which materialized in January-February 2009 HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE.

Fr. Baum speaks at length on the topic of the revised Vatican II “mission” of the Church which negates Catholic traditional missionary theology and activity which he was involved in formulating. Just as the central dogmas of Catholicism are subordinate to “Holocaust” theology as quoted above, so is Christian missionary activity, in Gregory Baum’s universe:

“The new openness to the Jewish faith and the emergence of a new understanding of mission reflect the response of the Christian conscience to the voice of the Holocaust …

Fr. Baum repeats his delusional language suggesting that God, speaking in judgment through “The Holocaust,” is commanding this change in mission:

“The churches believe that they have been addressed by God’s Word through these events: they have placed themselves under God’s judgment.” (ibid p.116)

Gregory Baum proposed a replacement theology in which the “existence” of “The Jews” is the first principle to which even the most fundamental Catholic dogmas must yield. I reiterate that it is a Vatican II peritus who wrote these things 35 years ago. Clearly we can see in recent events that many prelates in and outside the Vatican have made these lunatic ideas their own.

See:

The New Catholic “Shoah” Theology: Newsletter #47

"Auschwitz: Beginning of a New Era?"

April 28, 2009

I have been reading a book titled, Auschwitz: Beginning of a New Era? This is a collection of papers given at an “International Symposium on the Holocaust” held at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City, June 3 to 6, 1974. The book is edited by Eva Fleischer and published by the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine and the “Anti-Defamation League” of “B’nai B’rith.”

The title of the book should be Theological Contrivances Rationalizing Displacement of Calvary by Auschwitz to be Taught in Christian Churches and Schools because that is precisely what Catholic priests, Protestant ministers, rabbis and others including Elie Wiesel came together to synthesize at this symposium.

Gregory Baum was a Judaic (alleged) convert to Catholicism and Catholic priest, assistant to Cardinal Bea and peritus (theological advisor) at the Second Vatican Council, particularly on the three most troubling Vatican II documents, Dignitatis Humanæ, Unitatis Redintegratio and Nostra Aetate. For the moment I will focus primarily on his words because he was a priest of great influence in Rome and at the Vatican II Council.

Getting straight to business, Fr. Gregory Baum opened his talk thus:

After Auschwitz the Christian churches no longer wish to convert the Jews. While they may not be sure of the theological grounds that dispense them from this mission, the churches have become aware that asking the Jews to become Christians is a spiritual way of blotting them out of existence and thus only reinforces the effects of the Holocaust. The churches, moreover, realize the deadly irony implicit in a Christian plea for the conversion of the Jews; for after Auschwitz and the participation of the nations, it is the Christian world that is in need of conversion. The major churches have come to repudiate mission to the Jews, even if they have not justified this by adequate doctrinal explanations. We have here a case, frequently found in church history, where a practical decision on the part of the churches, in response to a significant event, precedes dogmatic reflection and in fact becomes the guide to future doctrinal development. Moved by a sense of shame over the doctrinal formulations that negate Jewish existence, the churches have come to recognize Judaism as an authentic religion before God, with independent value and meaning, not as a stage on the way to Christianity …

The new openness to Jewish faith and the emergence of a new understanding of mission reflect the response of the Christian conscience to the voice of the Holocaust … The churches believe that they have been addressed by God’s Word through these events: they have placed themselves under God’s judgment.

Fr. Baum later returns to this idea that “God’s Word” is spoken to the “Christian conscience” through “The Holocaust” and explains what is “demanded” in response to “God’s call.”

Even without elaborating an adequate dogmatic basis, they have made significant public declarations and changed the public policy in remarkable ways. Christian theologians have reflected on the new trends and tried to establish their doctrinal foundation. Christian educators have begun to rewrite catechisms and schoolbooks. Many missionary congregations and Christian-action groups have abandoned their former ideal of evangelization and adopted a new policy, according to which missionaries enter into solidarity with the people in whose midst they serve, bear the burdens of life with them, and promote the self-discovery and humanization taking place in their midst. In particular the churches have renounced the desire to convert the Jews; they have begun to call them brothers and sisters.

While these changes have taken place on the highest ecclesiastical level, in official circles and among Christians intensely involved in the problems of contemporary life, the effect of the new policy on the great majority of Christians is negligible. Most Christians have not even begun to reflect on these issues … the reason why the new policies adopted by the churches have so little power and influence among Christians is that the negation of Judaism and other religions seems to be built into the central Christian symbols. The corrections made on the margins hardly affect the central teaching. Since Christian teaching confesses Jesus as the one mediator between God and man, and the church as the true Israel, the unique vehicle of salvation, in whom the peoples of the world will find forgiveness and new life, the dangerous social trends against which the new ecclesiastical policies have reacted continue to affect the Christian understanding of history. Unless people are well informed and belong to a religious elite, the traditional language continues to shape their outlook and attitude. What is demanded, therefore, is that the churches interpret the central Christian doctrine, in obedience to God’s call, in a more socially responsible way and find a sound dogmatic basis for their new policies … (Auschwitz, Beginning of a New Era?, pp. 113, 116-117)

As we can see, Vatican II peritus Fr. Gregory Baum was not a convert to Catholicism, but rather, a subvert who sought to convert Catholics to a new religion as he stated explicitly himself: “… after Auschwitz … it is the Christian world that is in need of conversion.”

“After Auschwitz” is of course Baum’s designator for the measurement of time in the new dispensation he is operating in. As Calvary is replaced by Auschwitz in this new religion, so, Anno Domini is replaced by Anno Auschwitz. If you believe that I’m reading into his words, then listen to co-speaker Johannes Hoekendijk in his response to Baum’s paper:

“Are we anno Auschwitz 30 in a new era? That is what the theme of our colloquium suggests … After Auschwitz: The State of Israel–A New era.” (ibid p.129)

Note that Gregory Baum lamented in 1974 that while he and his comrades in Rome were inebriated on the new “Holocaust” religion that the laity in the pews hadn’t yet received the message. I imagine that he must be quite pleased with the “Holocaust” religion teaching opportunity which materialized in January-February 2009 HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE.

Fr. Baum speaks at length on the topic of the revised Vatican II “mission” of the Church which negates Catholic traditional missionary theology and activity which he was involved in formulating. Just as the central dogmas of Catholicism are subordinate to “Holocaust” theology as quoted above, so is Christian missionary activity, in Gregory Baum’s universe:

“The new openness to the Jewish faith and the emergence of a new understanding of mission reflect the response of the Christian conscience to the voice of the Holocaust …

Fr. Baum repeats his delusional language suggesting that God, speaking in judgment through “The Holocaust,” is commanding this change in mission:

“The churches believe that they have been addressed by God’s Word through these events: they have placed themselves under God’s judgment.” (ibid p.116)

Gregory Baum proposed a replacement theology in which the “existence” of “The Jews” is the first principle to which even the most fundamental Catholic dogmas must yield. I reiterate that it is a Vatican II peritus who wrote these things 35 years ago. Clearly we can see in recent events that many prelates in and outside the Vatican have made these lunatic ideas their own.

See:

The New Catholic “Shoah” Theology: Newsletter #47

"Auschwitz: Beginning of a New Era?"

April 28, 2009

I have been reading a book titled, Auschwitz: Beginning of a New Era? This is a collection of papers given at an “International Symposium on the Holocaust” held at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City, June 3 to 6, 1974. The book is edited by Eva Fleischer and published by the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine and the “Anti-Defamation League” of “B’nai B’rith.”

The title of the book should be Theological Contrivances Rationalizing Displacement of Calvary by Auschwitz to be Taught in Christian Churches and Schools because that is precisely what Catholic priests, Protestant ministers, rabbis and others including Elie Wiesel came together to synthesize at this symposium.

Gregory Baum was a Judaic (alleged) convert to Catholicism and Catholic priest, assistant to Cardinal Bea and peritus (theological advisor) at the Second Vatican Council, particularly on the three most troubling Vatican II documents, Dignitatis Humanæ, Unitatis Redintegratio and Nostra Aetate. For the moment I will focus primarily on his words because he was a priest of great influence in Rome and at the Vatican II Council.

Getting straight to business, Fr. Gregory Baum opened his talk thus:

After Auschwitz the Christian churches no longer wish to convert the Jews. While they may not be sure of the theological grounds that dispense them from this mission, the churches have become aware that asking the Jews to become Christians is a spiritual way of blotting them out of existence and thus only reinforces the effects of the Holocaust. The churches, moreover, realize the deadly irony implicit in a Christian plea for the conversion of the Jews; for after Auschwitz and the participation of the nations, it is the Christian world that is in need of conversion. The major churches have come to repudiate mission to the Jews, even if they have not justified this by adequate doctrinal explanations. We have here a case, frequently found in church history, where a practical decision on the part of the churches, in response to a significant event, precedes dogmatic reflection and in fact becomes the guide to future doctrinal development. Moved by a sense of shame over the doctrinal formulations that negate Jewish existence, the churches have come to recognize Judaism as an authentic religion before God, with independent value and meaning, not as a stage on the way to Christianity …

The new openness to Jewish faith and the emergence of a new understanding of mission reflect the response of the Christian conscience to the voice of the Holocaust … The churches believe that they have been addressed by God’s Word through these events: they have placed themselves under God’s judgment.

Fr. Baum later returns to this idea that “God’s Word” is spoken to the “Christian conscience” through “The Holocaust” and explains what is “demanded” in response to “God’s call.”

Even without elaborating an adequate dogmatic basis, they have made significant public declarations and changed the public policy in remarkable ways. Christian theologians have reflected on the new trends and tried to establish their doctrinal foundation. Christian educators have begun to rewrite catechisms and schoolbooks. Many missionary congregations and Christian-action groups have abandoned their former ideal of evangelization and adopted a new policy, according to which missionaries enter into solidarity with the people in whose midst they serve, bear the burdens of life with them, and promote the self-discovery and humanization taking place in their midst. In particular the churches have renounced the desire to convert the Jews; they have begun to call them brothers and sisters.

While these changes have taken place on the highest ecclesiastical level, in official circles and among Christians intensely involved in the problems of contemporary life, the effect of the new policy on the great majority of Christians is negligible. Most Christians have not even begun to reflect on these issues … the reason why the new policies adopted by the churches have so little power and influence among Christians is that the negation of Judaism and other religions seems to be built into the central Christian symbols. The corrections made on the margins hardly affect the central teaching. Since Christian teaching confesses Jesus as the one mediator between God and man, and the church as the true Israel, the unique vehicle of salvation, in whom the peoples of the world will find forgiveness and new life, the dangerous social trends against which the new ecclesiastical policies have reacted continue to affect the Christian understanding of history. Unless people are well informed and belong to a religious elite, the traditional language continues to shape their outlook and attitude. What is demanded, therefore, is that the churches interpret the central Christian doctrine, in obedience to God’s call, in a more socially responsible way and find a sound dogmatic basis for their new policies … (Auschwitz, Beginning of a New Era?, pp. 113, 116-117)

As we can see, Vatican II peritus Fr. Gregory Baum was not a convert to Catholicism, but rather, a subvert who sought to convert Catholics to a new religion as he stated explicitly himself: “… after Auschwitz … it is the Christian world that is in need of conversion.”

“After Auschwitz” is of course Baum’s designator for the measurement of time in the new dispensation he is operating in. As Calvary is replaced by Auschwitz in this new religion, so, Anno Domini is replaced by Anno Auschwitz. If you believe that I’m reading into his words, then listen to co-speaker Johannes Hoekendijk in his response to Baum’s paper:

“Are we anno Auschwitz 30 in a new era? That is what the theme of our colloquium suggests … After Auschwitz: The State of Israel–A New era.” (ibid p.129)

Note that Gregory Baum lamented in 1974 that while he and his comrades in Rome were inebriated on the new “Holocaust” religion that the laity in the pews hadn’t yet received the message. I imagine that he must be quite pleased with the “Holocaust” religion teaching opportunity which materialized in January-February 2009 HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE.

Fr. Baum speaks at length on the topic of the revised Vatican II “mission” of the Church which negates Catholic traditional missionary theology and activity which he was involved in formulating. Just as the central dogmas of Catholicism are subordinate to “Holocaust” theology as quoted above, so is Christian missionary activity, in Gregory Baum’s universe:

“The new openness to the Jewish faith and the emergence of a new understanding of mission reflect the response of the Christian conscience to the voice of the Holocaust …

Fr. Baum repeats his delusional language suggesting that God, speaking in judgment through “The Holocaust,” is commanding this change in mission:

“The churches believe that they have been addressed by God’s Word through these events: they have placed themselves under God’s judgment.” (ibid p.116)

Gregory Baum proposed a replacement theology in which the “existence” of “The Jews” is the first principle to which even the most fundamental Catholic dogmas must yield. I reiterate that it is a Vatican II peritus who wrote these things 35 years ago. Clearly we can see in recent events that many prelates in and outside the Vatican have made these lunatic ideas their own.

See:

The New Catholic “Shoah” Theology: Newsletter #47