Archive for the ‘haskalah’ Category

A Warning Regarding ‘Post-Zionism’

October 6, 2012
The following is excised from an article that appeared in Haaretz titled, Following the dream of a Third Temple in Jerusalem. It reveals many aspects of the dispensational nature of Judaism and Zionism. Increasing talk of ‘post-Zionism’ is no cause for celebration or rest. This is the fake Haskalah (Judaic so-called ‘enlightenment’) reaching the destination intended by Moses Hess (see: Judaism Discovered), the Bernays family, Rabbi Benjamin Szold, B’nai B’rith and others. No one should be deceived into believing that a new temple in Jerusalem would end Judaic hostility.

‘Zionism has brought us to here and now it’s time to move on, to continue from here. And this is the time of our redemption.’

‘… the expression of an almost inevitable development of the Zionist project’

Post-Zionism and the Temple

Dr. Ron Naiweld, who studies the literature of Hazal ‏(the ancient Jewish sages‏) at CNRS ‏(the National Center for Scientific Research‏) in France, and is doing research on the “rabbinization” of the Jewish world, sees the growth of the Temple movements as part of a post-Zionist trend. “The Zionist project has, in a way, run its course, and in its place movements are arising that are asking questions about the substance, content and legitimacy of that project,” he said. “It is yet another post-Zionist movement, really − like the ‘state of all its citizens’ idea. It’s a movement that said: ‘Zionism has brought us to here and now it’s time to move on, to continue from here. And this is the time of our redemption.’

“The religious redemption discourse possesses a logic of its own,” he continued. “The issue of the Temple remains a last protuberance, a dangling tooth that enables the religious Zionists to say, in the face of the religious injunction not to hasten the end, ‘Look, we are not hastening the end; when it comes to the Temple, we are waiting.’ It remains a last, disconnected remnant from all the rest of the activity of the religious Zionist movement. The messianic fervor, which assumed strong activist traits in the settlement project, shunted everything else aside. You cling to every bit of desolate land of a downtrodden Palestinian village, but you forgo the Temple Mount? There really is no logic to it. Until 1967, there was a compromise between two types of discourse, but after 1967, religious Zionism became more militant, with messianic fervor gaining the upper hand over pragmatism.”

From the time of the Second Temple, Naiweld explained, there have been two approaches in the Jewish world to the essence of halakhic law. “Daniel Schwartz addressed this subject 20 years ago in a groundbreaking article. There is the approach of the priests, which presents a realistic conception of halakha, holding that the law is determined by the nature of things. In other words, something will be pure or impure because it is pure or impure by the nature of its creation; because God created it pure or impure. In the face of this, there is the Pharisaic-rabbinical conception of the law, which is a nominalist concept. It holds that the halakha was determined by the human agent, which in the case of the Talmud consists of a group of rabbis who decide whether something is pure or impure, and this categorization does not derive from the inherent nature of the things.

“The struggle between these two approaches existed throughout Jewish history,” he added. “In the Second Temple period, it is seen in the struggle between the Pharisees and the Sadducees. You can see it in the form of people like [the late] Yeshayahu Leibowitz, who sanctify the law, the halakha, which is the determining element: intellectual religiosity, as compared with messianic movements − for whom halakha is divine law, because it expresses the true nature of objects and of human beings. That is why viewpoints like this will assume a very essentialist direction in terms of racism as well, because of the difference between Jews and Gentiles: A Jew is by the nature of his creation a purer being. Similarly with the holiness of the land: The soil of Israel is essentially holier, the stones are holier because the land was destined by God to serve as the place of the Children of Israel.”

Can it be said that these movements are the avant-garde of contemporary Judaism?

“It is an avant-garde that is the expression of an almost inevitable development of the Zionist project. And secular Zionism has nothing of interest to offer that can withstand these arguments. After all, the redemption is already under way; the Jews have already returned to the Land of Israel and the settlement enterprise is highly active. It doesn’t make sense for that activism to stop just before the Temple. That is the next logical target. There is no reason to stop at the Holy of Holies. If everything is so holy, then what is holiest is even more holy.”

Full article:

http://www.haaretz.com/weekend/magazine/following-the-dream-of-a-third-temple-in-jerusalem.premium-1.468221

Pope Appoints Fanatical Zionist to Church’s Highest Court

June 6, 2011

… from which position he will serve counterfeit Israel.


When Jaeger was asked [by the Israeli press] yesterday whether he feels Israeli, he replied, “at least as much as you do,” adding, “I’m just like any Israeli citizen who works for an international organization situated outside the country – just like there are Israelis at the International Monetary Fund in Washington, the UN in New York or UNESCO in Paris. I am in a supra-national international body, that’s the only the difference.”

“I’m a loyal and patriotic son of our people and our country,” he said. “After all, that was the whole point of the Jewish people’s emancipation in the 19th century, that we would become a nation, not a religious minority among gentiles.

For a clear understanding of Zionist Jeager’s statement, “that was the whole point of the Jewish people’s emancipation in the 19th century, that we would become a nation, not a religious minority among gentiles,” please see Revisionist History Newsletter No. 40 on Moses Hess or the pages on Moses Hess in Judaism Discovered.


Israeli Jew turned Catholic priest named head of papal court

David Maria Jaeger, a native of downtown Tel Aviv who converted to Catholicism, will become a prelate auditors of the Roman Rota, one of the chief papal law courts of the Catholic church.

Tomer Zarchin – Haaretz

David Maria Jaeger, a Catholic priest who converted from Judaism, will be installed this morning as a prelate auditor of the Roman Rota, a papal law court that serves as the chief appellate court of the Catholic Church.

Jaeger has come a long way from his youth in downtown Tel Aviv. He attended Bilu Elementary School, at that time a school for Tel Aviv’s religious Zionist bourgeoisie, studied at the Zeitlin religious high school and from there, went all the way to the Holy See’s highest court.

His sister Leah flew in from Israel yesterday morning for the event, bringing a special sculpture made especially for the new auditor by Menashe Kadishman. The artist hammered out the image of Jesus on the cross, with his head on the upper edge of the cross and his hands bound to its sides.

Attorney Chaim Stanger, a close friend of Jaeger’s from their days together at Bilu, was also invited, but will be unable to attend because he has been under house arrest for the last few months.

Jaeger’s appointment to the Holy See’s highest judicial body – comprising 20 auditors hand-picked by the pope and headed by Dean of the Rota Antoni Stankiewicz – is considered a personal sign of appreciation by the pope for Jaeger’s years as legal adviser to the delegation that negotiated the Vatican’s Fundamental Agreement with Israel. This pact, signed in 1993, enabled the establishment of diplomatic relations between the parties the following year.

Jaeger, 56, was born in Tel Aviv to Gershon, a legendary history teacher at the Ironi A High School, and Dvora, who served as Brazil’s deputy consul in Israel.

“He was a genius, physically large, an intellectual at a young age,” Stanger said. “He spoke unusually maturely for his age. And children abused and hurt him.”

As a teenager, Stanger continued, “Jaeger disappeared for six years.” When he returned, at 22, he met Stanger and told him, “You know, I’m now in the church.”

“I have a black hole regarding the period between the ages of 16 and 22,” Stanger said. “He returned a doctor of theology and never spoke of the process he underwent. He told me, ‘Chaim, when the time comes, we’ll talk.'”

In the 1980s, Stanger came to his friend’s aid, defending him in a report that Channel 1 television did about Jaeger. Rabbi Shlomo Goren, at whose north Tel Aviv synagogue Jaeger’s father prayed, had attacked the younger Jaeger, terming him a meshumad – a derogatory word for someone who converts away from Judaism that literally means “destroyed.”

Jaeger asked Stanger to defend him, and the latter told Channel 1, “A person cannot be wiped out, his soul cannot be killed.”

Stanger noted that Jaeger’s father acted “as if he didn’t know his son had converted to Christianity, because as I understood it, this wasn’t something they spoke about. But he was loved by both his parents; his mother also gave him support and love.”

Another person who became Jaeger’s friend is Prof. Arie Nadler, a former dean of Tel Aviv University’s School of Social Sciences. The two met several years ago at a university symposium on the subject of prejudice.

“He came dressed as a Franciscan priest, but he was immediately familiar to me,” Nadler said yesterday. “He looked just like his father, who was my admired history teacher at Ironi A and a significant and special figure in my life. He began to tell us about himself, and it was very exciting to me. We met several times, in Rome as well, and we became friends.

“He is a special man,” Nadler continued. “He’s told me about his deep ties to Israel. We didn’t delve deeply into the reasons for his Christianity. He only gave hints.”

When Jaeger was asked yesterday whether he feels Israeli, he replied, “at least as much as you do,” adding, “I’m just like any Israeli citizen who works for an international organization situated outside the country – just like there are Israelis at the International Monetary Fund in Washington, the UN in New York or UNESCO in Paris. I am in a supra-national international body, that’s the only the difference.”

“I’m a loyal and patriotic son of our people and our country,” he said. “After all, that was the whole point of the Jewish people’s emancipation in the 19th century, that we would become a nation, not a religious minority among gentiles. A person can live according to his conscience, he can not believe in any religious faith or believe in one rather than another, all according to his own intellectual conscience.”

Jaeger held two important positions en route to this appointment: legal adviser to the Holy See in the negotiations with Israel and, in the 1990s, head of the Diocesan court of Austin, Texas, which rules on issues of canon law such as marriage annulments.

Over the past two decades, he has divided his time among Israel, Rome and the United States. He will hold his new post until age 75.

http://www.haaretz.com/print-edition/news/israeli-jew-turned-catholic-priest-named-head-of-papal-court-1.365615

also see

Senator Chuck “Shomer Yisrael” must be Replaced by a Senator who will “Shomer” the U.S.

Papal Commission Promotes Noahide Laws