Archive for the ‘Exegesis’ Category

Religion in the Post-Auschwitz Dispensation

February 23, 2008

Get to know the thinking of the elite theologians of our time: “Christianity” referenced to Auschwitz rather than Calvary.

Theology after Auschwitz
A Provisional Program
By Franz Mussner

I ‘Theology after Auschwitz’1

Theology after Auschwitz cannot be identical with theology before Auschwitz. Theology after Auschwitz takes appalled cognizance of the terrible events of the Shoah. J. B. Metz states:2 “After all, one does not say that for Christians there are no other experiences of God than those of Auschwitz. Certainly! But if for us there is no God in Auschwitz, then where else shall we find him?” For Metz, therefore, the question is “if we Christians are prepared to grasp and bear in mind the catastrophe of Auschwitz and to accept it seriously as a challenge, as we are frequently called upon to do – and, of course, not only in respect of our German history and our German awareness of history, but also in respect of our Christianity and our Christian view of God, i.e., our theology. Furthermore, Fr.-W. Marquardt writes:3 “The existence of the Jewish witness to God is essential to Christian faith, if it is to proclaim the living God. And if after Auschwitz there is to be a task for theology at all, then it is to consider what we lack in God if we have lost Israel . . . An imperious cry of ‘Auschwitz never again’ poses a particular understanding of history. It does not permit a flight from history into what is essentially a misrepresentation of the historical facts of the faith, as is often represented in the name of Christ.”

What follows now, divided into ‘Exegesis after Auschwitz’ and ‘Systematology after Auschwitz,’ is the presentation of a program (if by no means exhaustive) which deals with those topics that need to be discussed in a ‘theology after Auschwitz.’

Full paper:

http://jcrelations.net/en/?item=771

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Religion in the Post-Auschwitz Dispensation

February 23, 2008

Get to know the thinking of the elite theologians of our time: “Christianity” referenced to Auschwitz rather than Calvary.

Theology after Auschwitz
A Provisional Program
By Franz Mussner

I ‘Theology after Auschwitz’1

Theology after Auschwitz cannot be identical with theology before Auschwitz. Theology after Auschwitz takes appalled cognizance of the terrible events of the Shoah. J. B. Metz states:2 “After all, one does not say that for Christians there are no other experiences of God than those of Auschwitz. Certainly! But if for us there is no God in Auschwitz, then where else shall we find him?” For Metz, therefore, the question is “if we Christians are prepared to grasp and bear in mind the catastrophe of Auschwitz and to accept it seriously as a challenge, as we are frequently called upon to do – and, of course, not only in respect of our German history and our German awareness of history, but also in respect of our Christianity and our Christian view of God, i.e., our theology. Furthermore, Fr.-W. Marquardt writes:3 “The existence of the Jewish witness to God is essential to Christian faith, if it is to proclaim the living God. And if after Auschwitz there is to be a task for theology at all, then it is to consider what we lack in God if we have lost Israel . . . An imperious cry of ‘Auschwitz never again’ poses a particular understanding of history. It does not permit a flight from history into what is essentially a misrepresentation of the historical facts of the faith, as is often represented in the name of Christ.”

What follows now, divided into ‘Exegesis after Auschwitz’ and ‘Systematology after Auschwitz,’ is the presentation of a program (if by no means exhaustive) which deals with those topics that need to be discussed in a ‘theology after Auschwitz.’

Full paper:

http://jcrelations.net/en/?item=771

Kosher Catholic Exegesis

May 2, 2007

EDITORS NOTE: Since the rabbis have only one flimsy document, Nostra Aetate, to build their Noachide church upon, others must be created.

Synod outline says Bible is source of Christian unity, bond with Jews

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — The Bible is a source of Christian unity and is evidence of Christianity’s special bond with the Jewish people, said the outline for the next world Synod of Bishops.

The theme of the synod, scheduled Oct. 5-26, 2008, will be: “The Word of God in the Life and Mission of the Church.”

Christianity and Judaism are “grounded in the same covenant, because God, who is always faithful to his promises, has not revoked the first covenant” with the Jewish people, it said.

Croatian Archbishop Nikola Eterovic, secretary-general of the Synod of Bishops, told reporters, “We would be happy if everyone said this is no longer a problem, but it is a question that must be asked.”

“Our relationship with the Jewish people is very special, and we hope every shadow of anti-Semitism has disappeared,” he said.

The archbishop said his office had not begun drawing up a list of the guests who will be invited to the synod, but he did not rule out the possibility of inviting a Jewish representative along with the delegates from other Christian churches. Such guests participate but do not vote at the synods.

Full Article:

http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/0702368.htm

The outline specifically asked bishops to report on any incidents in which the Scriptures are misused “to ferment attitudes of anti-Semitism,” a problem usually associated with readings about the passion of Jesus and the role of the Jewish leaders of his time.

Fighting anti-Semitism will be among issues discussed at the world summit of Catholic bishops next year, according to The Associated Press. Pope Benedict XVI has recently approved a 60-page document that asks bishops to examine sacred texts and how they may be misconstrued to promote anti-Jewish sentiments.
Full Article:

http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/living/17167318.htm

The need to step up the fight against anti-Semitism will be a key issue for the world’s Roman Catholic bishops at a meeting at the Vatican next year.

An entire section of a preparatory document released by the Vatican on Friday is devoted to the Church’s relationship with Jews, noting the “close associations of the two in faith” and calling for efforts “to overcome every form of anti-Semitism.”

The 60-page document, which was approved by Pope Benedict XVI, outlines the suggested topics and includes a questionnaire to be answered by local bishops.

After asking if priority is given to dialogue with the Jews, the questionnaire calls on bishops to investigate the use of biblical texts to “ferment attitudes of anti-Semitism.”

“Much has already been done, but everything must be done to dispel every shadow,” the
synod’s general-secretary, Bishop Nikola Eterovic, said during a news conference to present the agenda for the October 2008 meeting.

Full Article:

http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3393155,00.html

No reciprocal effort from the rabbis is planned, of course.

Kosher Catholic Exegesis

May 2, 2007

EDITORS NOTE: Since the rabbis have only one flimsy document, Nostra Aetate, to build their Noachide church upon, others must be created.

Synod outline says Bible is source of Christian unity, bond with Jews

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — The Bible is a source of Christian unity and is evidence of Christianity’s special bond with the Jewish people, said the outline for the next world Synod of Bishops.

The theme of the synod, scheduled Oct. 5-26, 2008, will be: “The Word of God in the Life and Mission of the Church.”

Christianity and Judaism are “grounded in the same covenant, because God, who is always faithful to his promises, has not revoked the first covenant” with the Jewish people, it said.

Croatian Archbishop Nikola Eterovic, secretary-general of the Synod of Bishops, told reporters, “We would be happy if everyone said this is no longer a problem, but it is a question that must be asked.”

“Our relationship with the Jewish people is very special, and we hope every shadow of anti-Semitism has disappeared,” he said.

The archbishop said his office had not begun drawing up a list of the guests who will be invited to the synod, but he did not rule out the possibility of inviting a Jewish representative along with the delegates from other Christian churches. Such guests participate but do not vote at the synods.

Full Article:

http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/0702368.htm

The outline specifically asked bishops to report on any incidents in which the Scriptures are misused “to ferment attitudes of anti-Semitism,” a problem usually associated with readings about the passion of Jesus and the role of the Jewish leaders of his time.

Fighting anti-Semitism will be among issues discussed at the world summit of Catholic bishops next year, according to The Associated Press. Pope Benedict XVI has recently approved a 60-page document that asks bishops to examine sacred texts and how they may be misconstrued to promote anti-Jewish sentiments.
Full Article:

http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/living/17167318.htm

The need to step up the fight against anti-Semitism will be a key issue for the world’s Roman Catholic bishops at a meeting at the Vatican next year.

An entire section of a preparatory document released by the Vatican on Friday is devoted to the Church’s relationship with Jews, noting the “close associations of the two in faith” and calling for efforts “to overcome every form of anti-Semitism.”

The 60-page document, which was approved by Pope Benedict XVI, outlines the suggested topics and includes a questionnaire to be answered by local bishops.

After asking if priority is given to dialogue with the Jews, the questionnaire calls on bishops to investigate the use of biblical texts to “ferment attitudes of anti-Semitism.”

“Much has already been done, but everything must be done to dispel every shadow,” the
synod’s general-secretary, Bishop Nikola Eterovic, said during a news conference to present the agenda for the October 2008 meeting.

Full Article:

http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3393155,00.html

No reciprocal effort from the rabbis is planned, of course.