Archive for the ‘Crypto-Rabbis’ Category

On the Contrary: The John Paul II Theology of Pope Benedict XVI

February 3, 2009

On the Contrary: The John Paul II Theology of Pope Benedict XVI

On the Contrary: The John Paul II Theology of Pope Benedict XVI

February 3, 2009

On the Contrary: The John Paul II Theology of Pope Benedict XVI

Benedict Met His Favorite Rabbi in Washington D.C.

May 8, 2008

The following is an email reportedly written by Rabbi Nuesner on the topic of his meeting with Benedict XVI on April 17th in Washington D.C. (the anniversary of the Last Supper according to the Hebrew Calendar) which was also reported in L’Osservatore Romano April 30th edition:

Thursday the train was an hour and a half late and we nearly missed the event. But we walked to the hotel where we were to meet for transportation and the US Council of Bishops staff was terrific. We were on the last bus to the ceremony. When we got there, at 4 pm, we were put in a large auditorium. The Muslims were sent off in one direction and the Jews in another for minhah and the Islamic equivalent.

The pope came about an hour and a half later and spoke to the 150 religious leaders who were there and exchanged gifts with representatives of Judaism, Islam, Jainism, Hinduism and Buddhism. There were no other Christianities that were invited.

After the ceremony the Jews were led into another room and the Pope read a greeting for Passover. Then the presiding bishop asked Rabbi Neusner to step forward.

I attach the picture taken by a rabbi and emailed to me. The pope thanked me for my work, his English is excellent but was an effort, and when I told him he could talk to me in Italian, he had a big smile and looked relieved and relaxed. I proposed to him that we write a book together on the convergences of Judaism and Christianity in antiquity. A cardinal told me they would like to invite me to the Vatican, and I said that would be terrific.

The editor of ‘L’osservatore romano’ the Vatican newspaper introduced himself. I told him his assistant had given me an assignment and I would have it in his hands by the time he got home. That ended the session with the Jewish representatives.

source:

http://tzvee.blogspot.com/2008/04/professor-neusner-meets-pope.html

What a triumph it would be for the rabbis if Benedict accepted Neusner’s offer to co-write a book on “the convergences of Judaism and Christianity in antiquity,” and what a smack in the face of Jesus Christ, the Apostles and saints who gave their lives to prevent such a thing.

More on Benedict XVI and his favorite rabbi, Jacob Neusner here:

The Pope and the Rabbi “Debate” Charade Continues to Play Out

Benedict Met His Favorite Rabbi in Washington D.C.

May 8, 2008

The following is an email reportedly written by Rabbi Nuesner on the topic of his meeting with Benedict XVI on April 17th in Washington D.C. (the anniversary of the Last Supper according to the Hebrew Calendar) which was also reported in L’Osservatore Romano April 30th edition:

Thursday the train was an hour and a half late and we nearly missed the event. But we walked to the hotel where we were to meet for transportation and the US Council of Bishops staff was terrific. We were on the last bus to the ceremony. When we got there, at 4 pm, we were put in a large auditorium. The Muslims were sent off in one direction and the Jews in another for minhah and the Islamic equivalent.

The pope came about an hour and a half later and spoke to the 150 religious leaders who were there and exchanged gifts with representatives of Judaism, Islam, Jainism, Hinduism and Buddhism. There were no other Christianities that were invited.

After the ceremony the Jews were led into another room and the Pope read a greeting for Passover. Then the presiding bishop asked Rabbi Neusner to step forward.

I attach the picture taken by a rabbi and emailed to me. The pope thanked me for my work, his English is excellent but was an effort, and when I told him he could talk to me in Italian, he had a big smile and looked relieved and relaxed. I proposed to him that we write a book together on the convergences of Judaism and Christianity in antiquity. A cardinal told me they would like to invite me to the Vatican, and I said that would be terrific.

The editor of ‘L’osservatore romano’ the Vatican newspaper introduced himself. I told him his assistant had given me an assignment and I would have it in his hands by the time he got home. That ended the session with the Jewish representatives.

source:

http://tzvee.blogspot.com/2008/04/professor-neusner-meets-pope.html

What a triumph it would be for the rabbis if Benedict accepted Neusner’s offer to co-write a book on “the convergences of Judaism and Christianity in antiquity,” and what a smack in the face of Jesus Christ, the Apostles and saints who gave their lives to prevent such a thing.

More on Benedict XVI and his favorite rabbi, Jacob Neusner here:

The Pope and the Rabbi “Debate” Charade Continues to Play Out

Benedict Met His Favorite Rabbi in Washington D.C.

May 8, 2008

The following is an email reportedly written by Rabbi Nuesner on the topic of his meeting with Benedict XVI on April 17th in Washington D.C. (the anniversary of the Last Supper according to the Hebrew Calendar) which was also reported in L’Osservatore Romano April 30th edition:

Thursday the train was an hour and a half late and we nearly missed the event. But we walked to the hotel where we were to meet for transportation and the US Council of Bishops staff was terrific. We were on the last bus to the ceremony. When we got there, at 4 pm, we were put in a large auditorium. The Muslims were sent off in one direction and the Jews in another for minhah and the Islamic equivalent.

The pope came about an hour and a half later and spoke to the 150 religious leaders who were there and exchanged gifts with representatives of Judaism, Islam, Jainism, Hinduism and Buddhism. There were no other Christianities that were invited.

After the ceremony the Jews were led into another room and the Pope read a greeting for Passover. Then the presiding bishop asked Rabbi Neusner to step forward.

I attach the picture taken by a rabbi and emailed to me. The pope thanked me for my work, his English is excellent but was an effort, and when I told him he could talk to me in Italian, he had a big smile and looked relieved and relaxed. I proposed to him that we write a book together on the convergences of Judaism and Christianity in antiquity. A cardinal told me they would like to invite me to the Vatican, and I said that would be terrific.

The editor of ‘L’osservatore romano’ the Vatican newspaper introduced himself. I told him his assistant had given me an assignment and I would have it in his hands by the time he got home. That ended the session with the Jewish representatives.

source:

http://tzvee.blogspot.com/2008/04/professor-neusner-meets-pope.html

What a triumph it would be for the rabbis if Benedict accepted Neusner’s offer to co-write a book on “the convergences of Judaism and Christianity in antiquity,” and what a smack in the face of Jesus Christ, the Apostles and saints who gave their lives to prevent such a thing.

More on Benedict XVI and his favorite rabbi, Jacob Neusner here:

The Pope and the Rabbi “Debate” Charade Continues to Play Out

Benedict Met His Favorite Rabbi in Washington D.C.

May 8, 2008

The following is an email reportedly written by Rabbi Nuesner on the topic of his meeting with Benedict XVI on April 17th in Washington D.C. (the anniversary of the Last Supper according to the Hebrew Calendar) which was also reported in L’Osservatore Romano April 30th edition:

Thursday the train was an hour and a half late and we nearly missed the event. But we walked to the hotel where we were to meet for transportation and the US Council of Bishops staff was terrific. We were on the last bus to the ceremony. When we got there, at 4 pm, we were put in a large auditorium. The Muslims were sent off in one direction and the Jews in another for minhah and the Islamic equivalent.

The pope came about an hour and a half later and spoke to the 150 religious leaders who were there and exchanged gifts with representatives of Judaism, Islam, Jainism, Hinduism and Buddhism. There were no other Christianities that were invited.

After the ceremony the Jews were led into another room and the Pope read a greeting for Passover. Then the presiding bishop asked Rabbi Neusner to step forward.

I attach the picture taken by a rabbi and emailed to me. The pope thanked me for my work, his English is excellent but was an effort, and when I told him he could talk to me in Italian, he had a big smile and looked relieved and relaxed. I proposed to him that we write a book together on the convergences of Judaism and Christianity in antiquity. A cardinal told me they would like to invite me to the Vatican, and I said that would be terrific.

The editor of ‘L’osservatore romano’ the Vatican newspaper introduced himself. I told him his assistant had given me an assignment and I would have it in his hands by the time he got home. That ended the session with the Jewish representatives.

source:

http://tzvee.blogspot.com/2008/04/professor-neusner-meets-pope.html

What a triumph it would be for the rabbis if Benedict accepted Neusner’s offer to co-write a book on “the convergences of Judaism and Christianity in antiquity,” and what a smack in the face of Jesus Christ, the Apostles and saints who gave their lives to prevent such a thing.

More on Benedict XVI and his favorite rabbi, Jacob Neusner here:

The Pope and the Rabbi “Debate” Charade Continues to Play Out

Benedict XVI Lauded by John Hagee

April 28, 2008

Words of praise from one crypto-rabbi to another.

Thank you, Pope Benedict

By Pastor John Hagee

Washington Times Editorial

April 28, 2008

During his recent visit to the United States, Pope Benedict XVI not only conducted mass and met with the Catholic faithful, but he made a series of public statements about the role that our Judeo-Christian faith can play during these challenging times. As an evangelical Protestant I happen to disagree with Pope Benedict on many issues of Christian doctrine and ritual. But when it comes to his moral vision for America and the world I have one thing to say in response to the Pope’s visit: Amen.

I and many other evangelical leaders believe that our faith must not be confined to our churches on Sunday mornings. We maintain that our Christian values and compassion can be powerful tools for helping build a more just and humane nation. Pope Benedict thus spoke for all of us when he said that “Any tendency to treat religion as a private matter must be resisted” and called for Christian participation “in the exchange of ideas in the public square.”

The pope was recalling the history we all cherish when he cited George Washington’s Farewell Address to note that, “religion and morality represent ‘indispensable supports’ of political prosperity.” The pope likewise voiced all of our concerns when he recognized the threats posed by secularism and materialism not only to our morality but to our happiness.

As people of faith, our concerns go well beyond the borders of our country. After the horrors of the Nazi Holocaust, we joined our Jewish brothers in saying “Never Again!” For me, this commitment means never again allowing the Jewish people to be massacred or persecuted and thus helps to motivate my strong support for the State of Israel. But we also take from the Holocaust a universal “Never Again,” which means that we must never again allow genocide to be perpetrated against any of God’s children anywhere in the world.

Thus all of our hearts cheered when Pope Benedict stood before the United Nations and stated so forcefully that when states fail to protect the basic human rights of their citizens, “the international community must intervene.” Likewise, all people of faith applauded his comment in the same speech that it is religion’s “recognition of the transcendent value of every man and woman” which provides the powerful source of our commitment to resist genocide and terrorism.

My reaction to Pope Benedict”s visit may surprise some who have come to accept certain caricatures of my views of the Catholic Church. But as I have noted from the start, my critics have ignored the real point and strong emphasis of my words. I have indeed been quite zealous about condemning the past anti-Semitism of the Catholic Church. But I have been equally zealous in condemning Protestant anti-Semitism. Furthermore, as I noted in my 2006 book “Jerusalem Countdown,” I have long viewed Pope John Paul II and now Pope Benedict XVI as partners in this “righteous work” of overcoming our shared legacy of Christian anti-Semitism.

For decades I have taught that we Christians need to recognize that our roots are Jewish. As Christians we can only understand ourselves if we understand the Judaism from which we sprang. Pope Benedict made this very important point when he visited the Park East Synagogue in New York and shared that: “I find it moving to recall that Jesus, as a young boy, heard the words of Scripture and prayed in a place such as this.” With visits and words such as these, Pope Benedict is continuing the important work of recognizing our enormous Christian debt of gratitude to the Jewish people.

The world in which we live faces many difficult challenges. In recent days, we read in our paper of increased starvation due to higher food prices; of alienated youth planning to bomb their fellow students; of Islamic militants actually bombing innocents in Iraq and Israel; and about people so devoid of hope that they end their own lives.

I believe that the message of the Bible and of Judeo-Christian faith offers us timely answers to these problems. We were all inspired by Pope Benedict’s visit. It is my prayer that we will now follow his example and look beyond our differences to see that when it comes to the great challenges of our times, people of faith have much in common.

Pastor John Hagee is founder and senior pastor of Cornerstone Church in San Antonio, Texas.

http://washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080428/EDITORIAL/855698663/1013

Benedict XVI Lauded by John Hagee

April 28, 2008

Words of praise from one crypto-rabbi to another.

Thank you, Pope Benedict

By Pastor John Hagee

Washington Times Editorial

April 28, 2008

During his recent visit to the United States, Pope Benedict XVI not only conducted mass and met with the Catholic faithful, but he made a series of public statements about the role that our Judeo-Christian faith can play during these challenging times. As an evangelical Protestant I happen to disagree with Pope Benedict on many issues of Christian doctrine and ritual. But when it comes to his moral vision for America and the world I have one thing to say in response to the Pope’s visit: Amen.

I and many other evangelical leaders believe that our faith must not be confined to our churches on Sunday mornings. We maintain that our Christian values and compassion can be powerful tools for helping build a more just and humane nation. Pope Benedict thus spoke for all of us when he said that “Any tendency to treat religion as a private matter must be resisted” and called for Christian participation “in the exchange of ideas in the public square.”

The pope was recalling the history we all cherish when he cited George Washington’s Farewell Address to note that, “religion and morality represent ‘indispensable supports’ of political prosperity.” The pope likewise voiced all of our concerns when he recognized the threats posed by secularism and materialism not only to our morality but to our happiness.

As people of faith, our concerns go well beyond the borders of our country. After the horrors of the Nazi Holocaust, we joined our Jewish brothers in saying “Never Again!” For me, this commitment means never again allowing the Jewish people to be massacred or persecuted and thus helps to motivate my strong support for the State of Israel. But we also take from the Holocaust a universal “Never Again,” which means that we must never again allow genocide to be perpetrated against any of God’s children anywhere in the world.

Thus all of our hearts cheered when Pope Benedict stood before the United Nations and stated so forcefully that when states fail to protect the basic human rights of their citizens, “the international community must intervene.” Likewise, all people of faith applauded his comment in the same speech that it is religion’s “recognition of the transcendent value of every man and woman” which provides the powerful source of our commitment to resist genocide and terrorism.

My reaction to Pope Benedict”s visit may surprise some who have come to accept certain caricatures of my views of the Catholic Church. But as I have noted from the start, my critics have ignored the real point and strong emphasis of my words. I have indeed been quite zealous about condemning the past anti-Semitism of the Catholic Church. But I have been equally zealous in condemning Protestant anti-Semitism. Furthermore, as I noted in my 2006 book “Jerusalem Countdown,” I have long viewed Pope John Paul II and now Pope Benedict XVI as partners in this “righteous work” of overcoming our shared legacy of Christian anti-Semitism.

For decades I have taught that we Christians need to recognize that our roots are Jewish. As Christians we can only understand ourselves if we understand the Judaism from which we sprang. Pope Benedict made this very important point when he visited the Park East Synagogue in New York and shared that: “I find it moving to recall that Jesus, as a young boy, heard the words of Scripture and prayed in a place such as this.” With visits and words such as these, Pope Benedict is continuing the important work of recognizing our enormous Christian debt of gratitude to the Jewish people.

The world in which we live faces many difficult challenges. In recent days, we read in our paper of increased starvation due to higher food prices; of alienated youth planning to bomb their fellow students; of Islamic militants actually bombing innocents in Iraq and Israel; and about people so devoid of hope that they end their own lives.

I believe that the message of the Bible and of Judeo-Christian faith offers us timely answers to these problems. We were all inspired by Pope Benedict’s visit. It is my prayer that we will now follow his example and look beyond our differences to see that when it comes to the great challenges of our times, people of faith have much in common.

Pastor John Hagee is founder and senior pastor of Cornerstone Church in San Antonio, Texas.

http://washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080428/EDITORIAL/855698663/1013

Benedict on St. Gregory of Nyssa

September 5, 2007

The latest installment in Benedict XVI’s series of talks on the Church Fathers focuses on St. Gregory of Nyssa:

In the last few catecheses I spoke about two great doctors of the Church of the fourth century, Basil and Gregory Nazianzen, bishop of Cappadocia, in present-day Turkey. Today we add a third, Basil’s brother, St. Gregory of Nyssa, who showed himself to be a man of meditative character, with a great capacity for reflection, and a vivacious intellect, open to the culture of his time. He showed himself in this way to be an original and deep thinker in Christian history …

Especially after Basil’s death, almost garnering his spiritual legacy, Gregory cooperated in the triumph of orthodoxy. He participated in various synods; he tried to settle divisions between the Churches; he took an active part in the Church’s reorganization; and, as “a pillar of orthodoxy,” he was a protagonist at the Council of Constantinople in 381, which defined the divinity of the Holy Spirit. (Benedict XVI, “On St. Gregory of Nyssa: A Pillar of Orthodoxy,” August 29, 2007)

Full lecture:
http://www.zenit.org/article-20361?l=english

It is true, St. Gregory of Nyssa was indeed a pillar of orthodoxy, and given that Benedict says as much himself, it’s worth examining what this pillar of orthodoxy, St. Gregory of Nyssa wrote of the people who Benedict calls his “elder brothers in the faith” with whom Christians “have a common mission.”

The Lawgiver of our life has enjoined upon us one single hatred. I mean, that of the Serpent: for no other purpose has He bidden us exercise this faculty of hatred, but as a resource against wickedness. “I will put enmity,” He says, “between you and him.” Since wickedness is a complicated and multifarious thing, the Word allegorizes it by the Serpent, the dense array of whose scales is symbolic of this multiformity of evil. And we by working the will of our Adversary make an alliance with this serpent, and so turn this hatred against one another, and perhaps not against ourselves alone, but against Him Who gave the commandment; for He says, “You shall love your neighbour and hate thine enemy,” commanding us to hold the foe to our humanity as our only enemy, and declaring that all who share that humanity are the neighbours of each one of us. But this gross-hearted age has disunited us from our neighbour, and has made us welcome the serpent, and revel in his spotted scales.

I affirm, then, that it is a lawful thing to hate God’s enemies, and that this kind of hatred is pleasing to our Lord: and by God’s enemies I mean those who deny the glory of our Lord, be they Jews, or downright idolaters, or those who through Arius’ teaching idolize the creature, and so adopt the error of the Jews. (St. Gregory of Nyssa, Letter 17)

http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/291117.htm

Now, I do not seize upon this statement by St. Gregory, which is typical to all of the Church Fathers, in an effort to stir up temporal animosity any more than St. Gregory intended to do so, but to demonstrate how double-minded it is of Benedict to on the one hand laud the orthodoxy of the Church Fathers who singularly identified Judaic practices, beliefs and those who uphold them as antithetical and inimical to Christianity, and on the other hand laud the “Jews” who today uphold these same beliefs and practices so opposed by the Church Fathers as our “elder brothers in the faith;” people with whom Christians “have a common mission.”

Are they our enemies or our allies? They cannot be both. So, either Benedict or the Church Doctor Gregory of Nyssa and all of the Church Fathers are wrong here. I side with the Church Fathers.

Judaic beliefs have only become more hostile towards Christianity and Christians since St. Gregory’s time. For the Vatican to make such a 180 degree turnaround from the position of the Church Fathers on this matter reflects a change on their part only and a most suspicious change at that.

Benedict on St. Gregory of Nyssa

September 5, 2007

The latest installment in Benedict XVI’s series of talks on the Church Fathers focuses on St. Gregory of Nyssa:

In the last few catecheses I spoke about two great doctors of the Church of the fourth century, Basil and Gregory Nazianzen, bishop of Cappadocia, in present-day Turkey. Today we add a third, Basil’s brother, St. Gregory of Nyssa, who showed himself to be a man of meditative character, with a great capacity for reflection, and a vivacious intellect, open to the culture of his time. He showed himself in this way to be an original and deep thinker in Christian history …

Especially after Basil’s death, almost garnering his spiritual legacy, Gregory cooperated in the triumph of orthodoxy. He participated in various synods; he tried to settle divisions between the Churches; he took an active part in the Church’s reorganization; and, as “a pillar of orthodoxy,” he was a protagonist at the Council of Constantinople in 381, which defined the divinity of the Holy Spirit. (Benedict XVI, “On St. Gregory of Nyssa: A Pillar of Orthodoxy,” August 29, 2007)

Full lecture:
http://www.zenit.org/article-20361?l=english

It is true, St. Gregory of Nyssa was indeed a pillar of orthodoxy, and given that Benedict says as much himself, it’s worth examining what this pillar of orthodoxy, St. Gregory of Nyssa wrote of the people who Benedict calls his “elder brothers in the faith” with whom Christians “have a common mission.”

The Lawgiver of our life has enjoined upon us one single hatred. I mean, that of the Serpent: for no other purpose has He bidden us exercise this faculty of hatred, but as a resource against wickedness. “I will put enmity,” He says, “between you and him.” Since wickedness is a complicated and multifarious thing, the Word allegorizes it by the Serpent, the dense array of whose scales is symbolic of this multiformity of evil. And we by working the will of our Adversary make an alliance with this serpent, and so turn this hatred against one another, and perhaps not against ourselves alone, but against Him Who gave the commandment; for He says, “You shall love your neighbour and hate thine enemy,” commanding us to hold the foe to our humanity as our only enemy, and declaring that all who share that humanity are the neighbours of each one of us. But this gross-hearted age has disunited us from our neighbour, and has made us welcome the serpent, and revel in his spotted scales.

I affirm, then, that it is a lawful thing to hate God’s enemies, and that this kind of hatred is pleasing to our Lord: and by God’s enemies I mean those who deny the glory of our Lord, be they Jews, or downright idolaters, or those who through Arius’ teaching idolize the creature, and so adopt the error of the Jews. (St. Gregory of Nyssa, Letter 17)

http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/291117.htm

Now, I do not seize upon this statement by St. Gregory, which is typical to all of the Church Fathers, in an effort to stir up temporal animosity any more than St. Gregory intended to do so, but to demonstrate how double-minded it is of Benedict to on the one hand laud the orthodoxy of the Church Fathers who singularly identified Judaic practices, beliefs and those who uphold them as antithetical and inimical to Christianity, and on the other hand laud the “Jews” who today uphold these same beliefs and practices so opposed by the Church Fathers as our “elder brothers in the faith;” people with whom Christians “have a common mission.”

Are they our enemies or our allies? They cannot be both. So, either Benedict or the Church Doctor Gregory of Nyssa and all of the Church Fathers are wrong here. I side with the Church Fathers.

Judaic beliefs have only become more hostile towards Christianity and Christians since St. Gregory’s time. For the Vatican to make such a 180 degree turnaround from the position of the Church Fathers on this matter reflects a change on their part only and a most suspicious change at that.