Archive for the ‘Catholic Schools’ Category

Curriculum at ‘Catholic’ School Features Nine Weeks of Holocaustolatry

November 13, 2009

Catholic students attend Jewish Kristallnacht

Renee Simmons – Collier Citizen

November 11, 2009

The Catholic and Jewish communities came together, Nov. 8, as eighth grade students from St. Elizabeth Seton were invited to attend the Kristallnacht convocation and reception at Temple Shalom.

Translated as “night of broken glass,” the ceremony marked the 71st anniversary of the night Nazi Germany launched its attack on Jewish citizens, breaking the glass in neighborhoods, businesses and temples owned by Jewish citizens and forcing families out of their homes.

“This is something in history that people need to know about,” said Melissa Keel, a member of the Catholic/Jewish Dialogue of Collier County, one of the event organizers. “I’m hoping the students will be able to converse with the survivors and that they will take that information back and share that with their schoolmates.”

The afternoon service included a procession of Holocaust survivors in a special candle lighting representing the six million Jews who died in the Holocaust, and the seven million others who were victims of Nazi aggression. Holocaust survivors also shared their stories with the attendees.

SES was the only school invited to the ceremony and school officials plan to incorporate the experience into an extensive Holocaust curriculum the school has set up for the students.

“Students at this age are more emotionally prepared to listen and learn about the events of the Holocaust,” says assistant principal Gina Groch. “We hope the students gain a more in-depth knowledge and understanding of the Holocaust, through the experience of coming together and learning with those of other faiths.”

The nine-week curriculum
is organized by Patricia Lyon, a middle school language arts and literature teacher. Already, students have visited the local Holocaust Museum, watched a DVD interview of Elie Wiesel, author of “Night, Read Night” and “Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl,” as well as researched reports and presentations and listened to oral accounts by local Holocaust survivors …

full article:

http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2009/nov/11/catholic-students-attend-jewish-kristallnacht/

The Kosher State of Catholic Teaching Material According to the Man who Kosher Slaughtered it

April 8, 2008

Today, you can’t read two consecutive chapters in any Catholic religious education textbook without talking about Jews and Judaism. That is buttressed by the history of Catholics and Jews in the United States. It was not incidental that the agenda of the American bishops going into the Second Vatican Council, as well as coming out of it, was religious liberty, ecumenism and Catholic-Jewish relations. (Eugene Fisher, interviewed in National Catholic Reporter, February 23, 2007)

http://www.centerforcatholicjewishstudies.org/Archives/ncr02_23_07.htm

see:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/05/scoundrel-eugene-fisher-to-retire.html

The Kosher State of Catholic Teaching Material According to the Man who Kosher Slaughtered it

April 8, 2008

Today, you can’t read two consecutive chapters in any Catholic religious education textbook without talking about Jews and Judaism. That is buttressed by the history of Catholics and Jews in the United States. It was not incidental that the agenda of the American bishops going into the Second Vatican Council, as well as coming out of it, was religious liberty, ecumenism and Catholic-Jewish relations. (Eugene Fisher, interviewed in National Catholic Reporter, February 23, 2007)

http://www.centerforcatholicjewishstudies.org/Archives/ncr02_23_07.htm

see:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/05/scoundrel-eugene-fisher-to-retire.html

Judaic Banker on a Judaizing Crusade in Catholic Schools and Seminaries

February 4, 2008

Last year it was revealed on this blog that this Judaic banker from Miami is energetically involved in altering (Judaizing) Catholic school curriculum, with full cooperation from the Miami Archdiocese. He’s as active as ever this year. Background here:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/judaic-lawyerbanker-altering-curriculum.html

… Bernardo Benes, a retired Cuban-born banker … Benes is Jewish …

When John Paul died in April 2005, Benes went ”as a simple Jew” to Rome for the funeral. Using his considerable business contacts, he was able to meet [JPII lifelong Judaic friend Jerzy] Kluger. That visit confirmed what Benes had been feeling for a while: somehow, the late pope’s work with the Jewish community had to continue.

Back in Miami, Benes threw himself into a new project, Our Elder Brothers and Sisters Foundation (www.ourelderbrothers.org). Its goal: To foster better relations between the Catholic Church and the Jewish people by building upon the late pope’s work.

So now Benes, 73, spends 10-hour days in front of a computer at a desk an old friend has loaned him in an office overlooking Coral Way. His fiery red hair has faded, and the stogie that was once his trademark is only an occasional indulgence.

Benes’ optimism, however, remains intact.

”He’s a very idealistic person, and that has sometimes gotten him into trouble,” says Dave Lawrence Jr., former Miami Herald publisher and a member of the Our Elder Brothers advisory board. “But we need people like him to make progress in this world. What would we do without big dreamers?”

The organization builds on the late pope’s work in three ways: by distributing a four-page brochure on John Paul II and the Jews, by promoting a universal celebration of April 13 in every synagogue and Catholic church as a commemoration of John Paul’s visit to the Great Synagogue of Rome in 1986, and by working with Catholic and Jewish educational institutions to include lessons about John Paul and the Jews in their curricula.

So far, Benes has recruited well-known local and national leaders to join his board and has raised $70,000 in small donations. His core advisers believe that the foundation’s mission is different from the efforts of other interfaith groups.

”It’s more practical and more activist,” says former U.S. ambassador Ambler Moss, a professor of international studies at the University of Miami who is on the foundation’s board. “The goals are very specific. He’s very focused on education.”

Benes has distributed hundreds of thousands of copies of the brochure — now translated into 11 languages — through churches, schools and other organizations. In October he attended the First Conference in the Vatican of Lay Catholic and Jewish Leaders. At his suggestion, John Paul’s writings on the Jews have been added to the curriculum at St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach, and the school’s course offerings now include a Jewish theology class taught by a rabbi.

”From an academic point of view, you can’t understand Catholic theology, certainly Christianity itself, without knowing Jewish thought,” says Steven O’Hala, vice rector and academic dean. “From a pastoral view, we want our seminarians to be more effective in a pluralistic setting, and this certainly contributes to that.”

Benes says his work these past two years is not that much different from the delicate political maneuvering he managed three decades ago. In fact, the goal — ”To make this a better world” — is the same … (Ana Veciana-Suarez, “Jewish exile takes up late pope’s work,” Miami Herald, Feb. 02, 2008)

Full article:

http://www.miamiherald.com/tropical_life/story/402130.html

From Benes’ “Our Elder Brothers” Website:

Get Involved

There are different levels of involvement you can select according to your commitment to expand our mission, as follows:

1.- Organize a Mass or an event at a Catholic Church similar to the one we organized in Miami on Sept. 17th. 2006-see media coverage under icon Press Room. The Mass is to celebrate the life of Pope Paul II as the reconciliator of Catholic and Jews. In our case we served a Kosher luncheon at the St. Mary’s Cathedral in Miami. Many local Jewish and Catholic leaders were invited.The media coverage was excellent.

2. Organize an event at a Synagogue inviting a Catholic, Protestant and Muslim clergy to celebrate the visit of Pope John Paul II to the Synagogue of Rome as we did in Miami on January 17th., 2007. See media coverage under icon Press Room. An adapted program could be develop by you. An ample media coverage took place.

3. For every Synagogue in the World to celebrate every April 13th the Anniversary of the visit of Pope John Paul II by inviting the priest of a Catholic Church in the area to participate in the celebration. We are working to start this event on April 13, 2007.

4. Visit and contact the Dean of Education of the Seminary in your area to include in the curriculum:
a) Studies of Pope John Paul II and the Jews
b) The Holocaust, and
c) Anti-Semitism

5. The distribution in your area of the brochure as it appears in the icon BROCHURE. It is very easy to finance the printing of it. Just let us know that you want to do it. We will tell you how.

6. Forward this website to any organization and/or individual that you know believes in ecumenism and interreligiuos activities as a way to advance the Judeo-Christian civilization.

If in principle you want to engage yourself in initiating any of the activities mentioned above, please contact us. We can provide you with many details of how to organize any of them. It will save you time and effort. We have the experience because we have done it already.

To become a Volunteer with the Our Elder Brothers and Sisters Foundation, please contact Bernardo Benes at 305 785-7028 or at e-mail address benesb@aol.com .

Thank you!

http://www.ourelderbrothers.org/get_involved.php

Judaic Banker on a Judaizing Crusade in Catholic Schools and Seminaries

February 4, 2008

Last year it was revealed on this blog that this Judaic banker from Miami is energetically involved in altering (Judaizing) Catholic school curriculum, with full cooperation from the Miami Archdiocese. He’s as active as ever this year. Background here:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/judaic-lawyerbanker-altering-curriculum.html

… Bernardo Benes, a retired Cuban-born banker … Benes is Jewish …

When John Paul died in April 2005, Benes went ”as a simple Jew” to Rome for the funeral. Using his considerable business contacts, he was able to meet [JPII lifelong Judaic friend Jerzy] Kluger. That visit confirmed what Benes had been feeling for a while: somehow, the late pope’s work with the Jewish community had to continue.

Back in Miami, Benes threw himself into a new project, Our Elder Brothers and Sisters Foundation (www.ourelderbrothers.org). Its goal: To foster better relations between the Catholic Church and the Jewish people by building upon the late pope’s work.

So now Benes, 73, spends 10-hour days in front of a computer at a desk an old friend has loaned him in an office overlooking Coral Way. His fiery red hair has faded, and the stogie that was once his trademark is only an occasional indulgence.

Benes’ optimism, however, remains intact.

”He’s a very idealistic person, and that has sometimes gotten him into trouble,” says Dave Lawrence Jr., former Miami Herald publisher and a member of the Our Elder Brothers advisory board. “But we need people like him to make progress in this world. What would we do without big dreamers?”

The organization builds on the late pope’s work in three ways: by distributing a four-page brochure on John Paul II and the Jews, by promoting a universal celebration of April 13 in every synagogue and Catholic church as a commemoration of John Paul’s visit to the Great Synagogue of Rome in 1986, and by working with Catholic and Jewish educational institutions to include lessons about John Paul and the Jews in their curricula.

So far, Benes has recruited well-known local and national leaders to join his board and has raised $70,000 in small donations. His core advisers believe that the foundation’s mission is different from the efforts of other interfaith groups.

”It’s more practical and more activist,” says former U.S. ambassador Ambler Moss, a professor of international studies at the University of Miami who is on the foundation’s board. “The goals are very specific. He’s very focused on education.”

Benes has distributed hundreds of thousands of copies of the brochure — now translated into 11 languages — through churches, schools and other organizations. In October he attended the First Conference in the Vatican of Lay Catholic and Jewish Leaders. At his suggestion, John Paul’s writings on the Jews have been added to the curriculum at St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach, and the school’s course offerings now include a Jewish theology class taught by a rabbi.

”From an academic point of view, you can’t understand Catholic theology, certainly Christianity itself, without knowing Jewish thought,” says Steven O’Hala, vice rector and academic dean. “From a pastoral view, we want our seminarians to be more effective in a pluralistic setting, and this certainly contributes to that.”

Benes says his work these past two years is not that much different from the delicate political maneuvering he managed three decades ago. In fact, the goal — ”To make this a better world” — is the same … (Ana Veciana-Suarez, “Jewish exile takes up late pope’s work,” Miami Herald, Feb. 02, 2008)

Full article:

http://www.miamiherald.com/tropical_life/story/402130.html

From Benes’ “Our Elder Brothers” Website:

Get Involved

There are different levels of involvement you can select according to your commitment to expand our mission, as follows:

1.- Organize a Mass or an event at a Catholic Church similar to the one we organized in Miami on Sept. 17th. 2006-see media coverage under icon Press Room. The Mass is to celebrate the life of Pope Paul II as the reconciliator of Catholic and Jews. In our case we served a Kosher luncheon at the St. Mary’s Cathedral in Miami. Many local Jewish and Catholic leaders were invited.The media coverage was excellent.

2. Organize an event at a Synagogue inviting a Catholic, Protestant and Muslim clergy to celebrate the visit of Pope John Paul II to the Synagogue of Rome as we did in Miami on January 17th., 2007. See media coverage under icon Press Room. An adapted program could be develop by you. An ample media coverage took place.

3. For every Synagogue in the World to celebrate every April 13th the Anniversary of the visit of Pope John Paul II by inviting the priest of a Catholic Church in the area to participate in the celebration. We are working to start this event on April 13, 2007.

4. Visit and contact the Dean of Education of the Seminary in your area to include in the curriculum:
a) Studies of Pope John Paul II and the Jews
b) The Holocaust, and
c) Anti-Semitism

5. The distribution in your area of the brochure as it appears in the icon BROCHURE. It is very easy to finance the printing of it. Just let us know that you want to do it. We will tell you how.

6. Forward this website to any organization and/or individual that you know believes in ecumenism and interreligiuos activities as a way to advance the Judeo-Christian civilization.

If in principle you want to engage yourself in initiating any of the activities mentioned above, please contact us. We can provide you with many details of how to organize any of them. It will save you time and effort. We have the experience because we have done it already.

To become a Volunteer with the Our Elder Brothers and Sisters Foundation, please contact Bernardo Benes at 305 785-7028 or at e-mail address benesb@aol.com .

Thank you!

http://www.ourelderbrothers.org/get_involved.php

"Jew" Teaches Holocaustolatry at Catholic School

July 27, 2007

EDITOR’S NOTE: This program has the full support of Catholic officials, from the USCCB to the Pope. Auschwitz is supplanting Calvary with their assistance.

Fellowship gives teacher the chance to learn more about the Holocaust

By SARAH BENSON
The Kansas City Star

“I want the kids to think about, ‘How can I make a difference? I can’t just be a bystander.’ ”

Teacher Kimberley Klein

For a seventh-grader, history can be boring.

There are dates to memorize, historical figures to remember and, sometimes, huge numbers to wrap your mind around.

Like this one — 6 million Jews died during the Holocaust.

But Kimberley Klein, a language arts teacher at Curé of Ars Catholic School in Leawood, teaches more than cold, hard facts.

“It’s not just a number,” she said. “It’s a person with a name, a person with a face.”

Klein was recently named an Alfred Lerner Fellow by the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous, an organization that provides financial assistance for elderly or needy people who helped Jews during the Holocaust.

The organization also shows educators how to better teach the Holocaust.

As an Alfred Lerner Fellow, Klein recently went to Columbia University in New York City for an intense academic seminar taught by Holocaust survivors and scholars.

Thirty-four educators from 12 states and two European countries — Croatia and Poland — participated in the program.

Even though she has several degrees, Klein said she’d never prepared so much for a course. Before she even set foot in New York, Klein had pored over 1,300 pages of assigned reading. But the most valuable information Klein gleaned from the program, she said, came from the accounts of Holocaust witnesses.

There was the German Jewish woman who said that as a girl, during the war, she couldn’t go to school because it was too dangerous. But a Catholic nun visited almost every day to continue teaching her, even though she was of a different faith.

And then there was the Holocaust survivor who said a Catholic priest saved her life. She still visits him once a year.

There were also countless farmers who hid Jews in barns or basements to save them from concentration camps.

“It’s very humbling to hear someone say ‘I appreciate what someone did for me,’ ” Klein said.

Klein was the first recipient of the Eduard Sonder Scholarship, which paid the program entrance fee. The scholarship was funded by two women whose grandfather, Eduard Sonder, died in the Holocaust. Sonder’s life insurance policy funds the scholarship.

Stanlee Stahl, JRF executive vice president, said Klein was chosen to receive the scholarship and become an Alfred Lerner Fellow because she was impressive on paper.

But, more than that, Stahl said, “there was a passion there that came through between the lines.”

Stahl said she was also surprised to find a teacher with such a thorough Holocaust unit in a Catholic school in a town with a relatively small Jewish population. She said most Alfred Lerner Fellows come from the East or West coasts, with only a handful of applicants from the Midwest.

Klein was nominated to be an Alfred Lerner Fellow by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education. She serves on the center’s teaching cadre.

Klein says her passion isn’t just for history — it’s for using history to better the present and the future.

“I want the kids to think about, ‘How can I make a difference? I can’t just be a bystander,’ ” Klein said.

Klein’s students read the newspaper and do community service projects, and they do their own research into the Holocaust.

Klein also uses her Holocaust lesson to teach basic curriculum. For example, students are supposed to be able to identify persuasive writing in seventh grade. Klein’s students analyze WWII-era German propaganda and how it affected public opinion at the time. Klein said that helps her students to become independent thinkers.

Since events that happened half a century ago can sometimes be difficult for a 13-year-old to relate to, Klein has to sometimes get creative. For example, her students research fashions of the 1930s on the Internet, then they look at photos taken at concentration camps. Often, the children in those photos are wearing contemporary trends, just like students today.

“These kids were just like you and me,” Klein tells her students.

Klein’s methods appear to be working. She said some of her students are inspired to do extra volunteer work. Recently, two of them joined an organization that helps the people of Rwanda, who in 1994 suffered genocide not unlike the Holocaust.

For Klein, there is no better reward than seeing her students use their knowledge of the past to better the present.

“That’s when I get excited,” she said. “When a student teaches me something.”

http://www.kansascity.com/news/neighborhood/johnson_county/story/202936.html

"Jew" Teaches Holocaustolatry at Catholic School

July 27, 2007

EDITOR’S NOTE: This program has the full support of Catholic officials, from the USCCB to the Pope. Auschwitz is supplanting Calvary with their assistance.

Fellowship gives teacher the chance to learn more about the Holocaust

By SARAH BENSON
The Kansas City Star

“I want the kids to think about, ‘How can I make a difference? I can’t just be a bystander.’ ”

Teacher Kimberley Klein

For a seventh-grader, history can be boring.

There are dates to memorize, historical figures to remember and, sometimes, huge numbers to wrap your mind around.

Like this one — 6 million Jews died during the Holocaust.

But Kimberley Klein, a language arts teacher at Curé of Ars Catholic School in Leawood, teaches more than cold, hard facts.

“It’s not just a number,” she said. “It’s a person with a name, a person with a face.”

Klein was recently named an Alfred Lerner Fellow by the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous, an organization that provides financial assistance for elderly or needy people who helped Jews during the Holocaust.

The organization also shows educators how to better teach the Holocaust.

As an Alfred Lerner Fellow, Klein recently went to Columbia University in New York City for an intense academic seminar taught by Holocaust survivors and scholars.

Thirty-four educators from 12 states and two European countries — Croatia and Poland — participated in the program.

Even though she has several degrees, Klein said she’d never prepared so much for a course. Before she even set foot in New York, Klein had pored over 1,300 pages of assigned reading. But the most valuable information Klein gleaned from the program, she said, came from the accounts of Holocaust witnesses.

There was the German Jewish woman who said that as a girl, during the war, she couldn’t go to school because it was too dangerous. But a Catholic nun visited almost every day to continue teaching her, even though she was of a different faith.

And then there was the Holocaust survivor who said a Catholic priest saved her life. She still visits him once a year.

There were also countless farmers who hid Jews in barns or basements to save them from concentration camps.

“It’s very humbling to hear someone say ‘I appreciate what someone did for me,’ ” Klein said.

Klein was the first recipient of the Eduard Sonder Scholarship, which paid the program entrance fee. The scholarship was funded by two women whose grandfather, Eduard Sonder, died in the Holocaust. Sonder’s life insurance policy funds the scholarship.

Stanlee Stahl, JRF executive vice president, said Klein was chosen to receive the scholarship and become an Alfred Lerner Fellow because she was impressive on paper.

But, more than that, Stahl said, “there was a passion there that came through between the lines.”

Stahl said she was also surprised to find a teacher with such a thorough Holocaust unit in a Catholic school in a town with a relatively small Jewish population. She said most Alfred Lerner Fellows come from the East or West coasts, with only a handful of applicants from the Midwest.

Klein was nominated to be an Alfred Lerner Fellow by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education. She serves on the center’s teaching cadre.

Klein says her passion isn’t just for history — it’s for using history to better the present and the future.

“I want the kids to think about, ‘How can I make a difference? I can’t just be a bystander,’ ” Klein said.

Klein’s students read the newspaper and do community service projects, and they do their own research into the Holocaust.

Klein also uses her Holocaust lesson to teach basic curriculum. For example, students are supposed to be able to identify persuasive writing in seventh grade. Klein’s students analyze WWII-era German propaganda and how it affected public opinion at the time. Klein said that helps her students to become independent thinkers.

Since events that happened half a century ago can sometimes be difficult for a 13-year-old to relate to, Klein has to sometimes get creative. For example, her students research fashions of the 1930s on the Internet, then they look at photos taken at concentration camps. Often, the children in those photos are wearing contemporary trends, just like students today.

“These kids were just like you and me,” Klein tells her students.

Klein’s methods appear to be working. She said some of her students are inspired to do extra volunteer work. Recently, two of them joined an organization that helps the people of Rwanda, who in 1994 suffered genocide not unlike the Holocaust.

For Klein, there is no better reward than seeing her students use their knowledge of the past to better the present.

“That’s when I get excited,” she said. “When a student teaches me something.”

http://www.kansascity.com/news/neighborhood/johnson_county/story/202936.html

Scoundrel, Eugene Fisher to Retire

May 17, 2007

EDITOR’S NOTE: Eugene Fisher’s role in the revision of Catholic teaching material and methods used in Catholic schools and seminaries to conformity with B’nai B’rith standards could not be overstated. His work was implemented with full support from the Vatican and the USCCB.

Bishops’ Catholic-Jewish expert of past 30 years prepares to retire

By Jerry Filteau
Catholic News Service

WASHINGTON (CNS) — Eugene J. Fisher said he currently has five books in the works and also hopes to do some teaching when he retires at the end of June after 30 years as associate director for Catholic-Jewish relations in the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Secretariat for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs …

On his first trip to Rome after he was named the bishops’ director of Catholic-Jewish relations in 1977, he said, a top Vatican Christian unity official “took me aside and said, ‘Gene, you have to move forward in the American dialogue. You are paving the way for us.'” …

Cardinal Keeler, U.S. episcopal moderator of Catholic-Jewish relations since 1988, said Fisher’s work has not been limited to the United States. On the international scene “Gene has had a key role, and his work on the International Catholic-Jewish Liaison Committee has been crucial,” the cardinal said.

He added that Fisher is one of the people he turns to “when some difficulty arises.”

Fisher has received a couple of honorary doctorates and numerous awards from Jewish groups for his work. Twice two professors from Hebrew University in Jerusalem nominated him for the Nobel Peace Prize.

He has attended meetings of the International Catholic-Jewish Liaison Committee since 1978 and has been a Vatican-appointed member since 1980, when he also was named a consultor to the Vatican’s Commission for Religious Relations With the Jews.

He earned his doctorate in Hebrew culture and education from New York University in 1976, writing his thesis on the treatment of Jews and Judaism in Catholic textbooks — a field in which he says he has seen tremendous progress over the years. His critiques of the treatment of Judaism in Catholic educational materials have been used as a resource in revamping catechetical texts in many countries.

“The church has two delivery systems” for its teaching, he said. “One is the classroom, one is the liturgy and the pulpit.” In both areas Catholics now receive an entirely different message about Jews and Judaism than they did for nearly 2,000 years before Vatican II, he said.

The list of books and monographs Fisher has written or edited, many in collaboration with Jewish scholars, already runs two full pages single-spaced.

He said the five more he is currently working on are his memoirs; a collection of Cardinal Keeler’s writings on Jewish-Christian relations; a third and final edition of Pope John Paul’s texts on Jews and Judaism; a third edition of “Seminary Education and Christian-Jewish Relations,” last published in 1988; and a collection, with commentary, of papal, Vatican and USCCB texts on Jews and Judaism since the council.

Full Article:

http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/0702766.htm

Eugene Fisher earned his doctorate at New York University in Hebrew Culture and Education, 1976. His doctoral thesis was: “The Treatment of Jews and Judaism in Current Roman Catholic Teaching”. Until 1977, Dr. Fisher was Director of Catechist Formation for the Archdiocese of Detroit, as well as adjunct professor of Sacred Scripture at St. John’s Seminary in Plymouth, Michigan, and for the Religious Studies department of the University of Detroit. Dr. Fisher was appointed to his present post as Executive Secretary of the Secretariat for Catholic-Jewish Relations of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops (NCCB) in May of 1977. He succeeded Father Edward H. Flannery, who had held the post since its establishment in 1968 as part of the NCCB Secretariat for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs. In 1981 he was named Consultor to the Vatican Commission for Religious Relations With the Jews. He is one of nine Consultors to the Vatican Commission worldwide and one of two Americans. He is also a member of the International Catholic-Jewish Liaison Committee representing the Holy See. He has lectured widely throughout the United States, Canada and Europe. In 1995, a book he co-edited with Rabbi Leon Klenicki, John Paul II, Spiritual Pilgrimage: Texts on Jews and Judaism (Crossroad) won the National Jewish Book Award in the Jewish-Christian Relations category. He has published some 20 books and over 250 articles in the field of Jewish-Christian relations.

http://www.jcrelations.net/en/?item=1108

Scoundrel, Eugene Fisher to Retire

May 17, 2007

EDITOR’S NOTE: Eugene Fisher’s role in the revision of Catholic teaching material and methods used in Catholic schools and seminaries to conformity with B’nai B’rith standards could not be overstated. His work was implemented with full support from the Vatican and the USCCB.

Bishops’ Catholic-Jewish expert of past 30 years prepares to retire

By Jerry Filteau
Catholic News Service

WASHINGTON (CNS) — Eugene J. Fisher said he currently has five books in the works and also hopes to do some teaching when he retires at the end of June after 30 years as associate director for Catholic-Jewish relations in the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Secretariat for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs …

On his first trip to Rome after he was named the bishops’ director of Catholic-Jewish relations in 1977, he said, a top Vatican Christian unity official “took me aside and said, ‘Gene, you have to move forward in the American dialogue. You are paving the way for us.'” …

Cardinal Keeler, U.S. episcopal moderator of Catholic-Jewish relations since 1988, said Fisher’s work has not been limited to the United States. On the international scene “Gene has had a key role, and his work on the International Catholic-Jewish Liaison Committee has been crucial,” the cardinal said.

He added that Fisher is one of the people he turns to “when some difficulty arises.”

Fisher has received a couple of honorary doctorates and numerous awards from Jewish groups for his work. Twice two professors from Hebrew University in Jerusalem nominated him for the Nobel Peace Prize.

He has attended meetings of the International Catholic-Jewish Liaison Committee since 1978 and has been a Vatican-appointed member since 1980, when he also was named a consultor to the Vatican’s Commission for Religious Relations With the Jews.

He earned his doctorate in Hebrew culture and education from New York University in 1976, writing his thesis on the treatment of Jews and Judaism in Catholic textbooks — a field in which he says he has seen tremendous progress over the years. His critiques of the treatment of Judaism in Catholic educational materials have been used as a resource in revamping catechetical texts in many countries.

“The church has two delivery systems” for its teaching, he said. “One is the classroom, one is the liturgy and the pulpit.” In both areas Catholics now receive an entirely different message about Jews and Judaism than they did for nearly 2,000 years before Vatican II, he said.

The list of books and monographs Fisher has written or edited, many in collaboration with Jewish scholars, already runs two full pages single-spaced.

He said the five more he is currently working on are his memoirs; a collection of Cardinal Keeler’s writings on Jewish-Christian relations; a third and final edition of Pope John Paul’s texts on Jews and Judaism; a third edition of “Seminary Education and Christian-Jewish Relations,” last published in 1988; and a collection, with commentary, of papal, Vatican and USCCB texts on Jews and Judaism since the council.

Full Article:

http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/0702766.htm

Eugene Fisher earned his doctorate at New York University in Hebrew Culture and Education, 1976. His doctoral thesis was: “The Treatment of Jews and Judaism in Current Roman Catholic Teaching”. Until 1977, Dr. Fisher was Director of Catechist Formation for the Archdiocese of Detroit, as well as adjunct professor of Sacred Scripture at St. John’s Seminary in Plymouth, Michigan, and for the Religious Studies department of the University of Detroit. Dr. Fisher was appointed to his present post as Executive Secretary of the Secretariat for Catholic-Jewish Relations of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops (NCCB) in May of 1977. He succeeded Father Edward H. Flannery, who had held the post since its establishment in 1968 as part of the NCCB Secretariat for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs. In 1981 he was named Consultor to the Vatican Commission for Religious Relations With the Jews. He is one of nine Consultors to the Vatican Commission worldwide and one of two Americans. He is also a member of the International Catholic-Jewish Liaison Committee representing the Holy See. He has lectured widely throughout the United States, Canada and Europe. In 1995, a book he co-edited with Rabbi Leon Klenicki, John Paul II, Spiritual Pilgrimage: Texts on Jews and Judaism (Crossroad) won the National Jewish Book Award in the Jewish-Christian Relations category. He has published some 20 books and over 250 articles in the field of Jewish-Christian relations.

http://www.jcrelations.net/en/?item=1108