Archive for the ‘Catholic Judaism’ Category

Judaic Fabricated Persecution

November 7, 2007

If no persecution exists, the Judaic dialectic fails to operate. If no persecution can be instigated, it is fabricated in order to generate guilt and sympathy from outsiders and fear inside the tribe.


Police: Jewish GW Student Admits Putting Swastikas On Her Door

November 5, 2007

WASHINGTON — George Washington University officials said a Jewish student who complained about swastikas showing up on her door put them there herself.

The student lives in Mitchell Hall, where half a dozen swastikas had shown up on her dorm room door in the past several weeks.

University police set up a hidden camera. They said the girl admitted responsibility Monday.

News 4 interviewed the student last week after the fifth swastika was discovered. She did not want to be identified.

“It’s a big story,” said Jake Sherman, GW Hatchet editor. “Thirty percent of GW students are Jewish”

Reporters at the GW Hatchet newspaper have been following the story since it began. They said they learned on Monday morning that the alleged victim would likely be implicated.

They said they spoke to her twice by phone.

According to reporters at the newspaper, the student said, “I wasn’t looking to create this sort of insanity. I wasn’t looking to become a media darling. I was just looking for acknowledgment from the university that someone drew a swastika on the door.”

The student now faces disciplinary action from the school and could face criminal charges.

http://www.nbc4.com/news/14516979/detail.html

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Judaic Fabricated Persecution

November 7, 2007

If no persecution exists, the Judaic dialectic fails to operate. If no persecution can be instigated, it is fabricated in order to generate guilt and sympathy from outsiders and fear inside the tribe.


Police: Jewish GW Student Admits Putting Swastikas On Her Door

November 5, 2007

WASHINGTON — George Washington University officials said a Jewish student who complained about swastikas showing up on her door put them there herself.

The student lives in Mitchell Hall, where half a dozen swastikas had shown up on her dorm room door in the past several weeks.

University police set up a hidden camera. They said the girl admitted responsibility Monday.

News 4 interviewed the student last week after the fifth swastika was discovered. She did not want to be identified.

“It’s a big story,” said Jake Sherman, GW Hatchet editor. “Thirty percent of GW students are Jewish”

Reporters at the GW Hatchet newspaper have been following the story since it began. They said they learned on Monday morning that the alleged victim would likely be implicated.

They said they spoke to her twice by phone.

According to reporters at the newspaper, the student said, “I wasn’t looking to create this sort of insanity. I wasn’t looking to become a media darling. I was just looking for acknowledgment from the university that someone drew a swastika on the door.”

The student now faces disciplinary action from the school and could face criminal charges.

http://www.nbc4.com/news/14516979/detail.html

Vatican to Move Rabbinic Subversion Beyond the Clergy and Into the Pews

October 17, 2007

Xavier University Representatives to Attend Catholic-Jewish Relations Conference at Vatican
10/16/2007 – PST

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MEDIA ADVISORY
Catholic PRWire

CINCINNATI, OH, OCTOBER 16, 2007 – Xavier University President Michael J. Graham, S.J., and Rabbi Abie Ingber, director for Hillel at Xavier, along with a group of Xavier representatives will travel to Rome to attend the First Lay Conference on Catholic-Jewish relations at the Vatican, October 21-25.

The other members of the Xavier group include: James Buchanan, director for Edward B. Brueggeman Center for Dialogue; Art Shriberg, professor of management and entrepreneurship; Jewish student Michael Loban; and Catholic student Maggie Meyer.

The conference’s goal, Ingber says, is to move bridge-building beyond the clergy and “into the pews.” The discussion will revolve around identifying areas of “commonality and divide” between the traditions. Lay leaders from 18 U.S. cities will attend, hopefully laying the groundwork for a network to share ideas and programming. Participants will also meet with high-ranking Church officials at the Vatican to create a greater understanding of issues between the two faiths.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for all of us at Xavier, especially our students,” said Graham. “Exploring and discussing the many aspects of our two traditions at such a grassroots level is so important for our future as people of faith.”

“Our hope is we can come back to the U.S. and continue these relationships and perhaps even expand it to include lay leaders from the Muslim community,” Ingber says. “If you get good at bridge building, there are lots of rivers to cross.”

The conference is sponsored by the Interreligious Information Center (IIC) of which Ingber is vice president. Through research, academic exchanges, educational programs, media outreach, IIC develops projects and activities to enhance greater understanding of faiths and religion in our society. IIC works will all major faith groups.

Beyond the dialogue, the group will present a Menorah to Pope Benedict. The Menorah is a replica of one Ingber helped install at the Vatican in observance of Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) in 1999. Replicas have also been presented to the late Pope John Paul II and Father Graham. The group will also meet with Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity and Jerzy Kluger, Pope John Paul II’s closest Jewish friend. They also plan to visit the Great Synagogue of Rome.

http://www.catholic.org/prwire/headline.php?ID=4277

Also see:

Xavier University Gets Even More Kosher

Vatican to Move Rabbinic Subversion Beyond the Clergy and Into the Pews

October 17, 2007

Xavier University Representatives to Attend Catholic-Jewish Relations Conference at Vatican
10/16/2007 – PST

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MEDIA ADVISORY
Catholic PRWire

CINCINNATI, OH, OCTOBER 16, 2007 – Xavier University President Michael J. Graham, S.J., and Rabbi Abie Ingber, director for Hillel at Xavier, along with a group of Xavier representatives will travel to Rome to attend the First Lay Conference on Catholic-Jewish relations at the Vatican, October 21-25.

The other members of the Xavier group include: James Buchanan, director for Edward B. Brueggeman Center for Dialogue; Art Shriberg, professor of management and entrepreneurship; Jewish student Michael Loban; and Catholic student Maggie Meyer.

The conference’s goal, Ingber says, is to move bridge-building beyond the clergy and “into the pews.” The discussion will revolve around identifying areas of “commonality and divide” between the traditions. Lay leaders from 18 U.S. cities will attend, hopefully laying the groundwork for a network to share ideas and programming. Participants will also meet with high-ranking Church officials at the Vatican to create a greater understanding of issues between the two faiths.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for all of us at Xavier, especially our students,” said Graham. “Exploring and discussing the many aspects of our two traditions at such a grassroots level is so important for our future as people of faith.”

“Our hope is we can come back to the U.S. and continue these relationships and perhaps even expand it to include lay leaders from the Muslim community,” Ingber says. “If you get good at bridge building, there are lots of rivers to cross.”

The conference is sponsored by the Interreligious Information Center (IIC) of which Ingber is vice president. Through research, academic exchanges, educational programs, media outreach, IIC develops projects and activities to enhance greater understanding of faiths and religion in our society. IIC works will all major faith groups.

Beyond the dialogue, the group will present a Menorah to Pope Benedict. The Menorah is a replica of one Ingber helped install at the Vatican in observance of Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) in 1999. Replicas have also been presented to the late Pope John Paul II and Father Graham. The group will also meet with Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity and Jerzy Kluger, Pope John Paul II’s closest Jewish friend. They also plan to visit the Great Synagogue of Rome.

http://www.catholic.org/prwire/headline.php?ID=4277

Vatican to Move Rabbinic Subversion Beyond the Clergy and Into the Pews

October 17, 2007

Xavier University Representatives to Attend Catholic-Jewish Relations Conference at Vatican
10/16/2007 – PST

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MEDIA ADVISORY
Catholic PRWire

CINCINNATI, OH, OCTOBER 16, 2007 – Xavier University President Michael J. Graham, S.J., and Rabbi Abie Ingber, director for Hillel at Xavier, along with a group of Xavier representatives will travel to Rome to attend the First Lay Conference on Catholic-Jewish relations at the Vatican, October 21-25.

The other members of the Xavier group include: James Buchanan, director for Edward B. Brueggeman Center for Dialogue; Art Shriberg, professor of management and entrepreneurship; Jewish student Michael Loban; and Catholic student Maggie Meyer.

The conference’s goal, Ingber says, is to move bridge-building beyond the clergy and “into the pews.” The discussion will revolve around identifying areas of “commonality and divide” between the traditions. Lay leaders from 18 U.S. cities will attend, hopefully laying the groundwork for a network to share ideas and programming. Participants will also meet with high-ranking Church officials at the Vatican to create a greater understanding of issues between the two faiths.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for all of us at Xavier, especially our students,” said Graham. “Exploring and discussing the many aspects of our two traditions at such a grassroots level is so important for our future as people of faith.”

“Our hope is we can come back to the U.S. and continue these relationships and perhaps even expand it to include lay leaders from the Muslim community,” Ingber says. “If you get good at bridge building, there are lots of rivers to cross.”

The conference is sponsored by the Interreligious Information Center (IIC) of which Ingber is vice president. Through research, academic exchanges, educational programs, media outreach, IIC develops projects and activities to enhance greater understanding of faiths and religion in our society. IIC works will all major faith groups.

Beyond the dialogue, the group will present a Menorah to Pope Benedict. The Menorah is a replica of one Ingber helped install at the Vatican in observance of Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) in 1999. Replicas have also been presented to the late Pope John Paul II and Father Graham. The group will also meet with Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity and Jerzy Kluger, Pope John Paul II’s closest Jewish friend. They also plan to visit the Great Synagogue of Rome.

http://www.catholic.org/prwire/headline.php?ID=4277

Also see:

Xavier University Gets Even More Kosher

Backpeddling Bishops

March 12, 2007

German cardinal sorry for ghetto
remarks

By Eli Ashkenazi

The head of the German Bishops Conference conceded that some statements made by members on a recent visit to Israel and the West Bank were “inappropriate.” Cardinal Karl Lehmann responded a few days ago to a letter sent to him by Avner Shalev, chairman of the Yad Vashem Martyrs and Heroes Remembrance Authority, protesting a statement made a short time after the group visited Yad Vashem earlier this month, and then traveled to Ramallah. “In the morning we saw the Warsaw Ghetto and now it’s the Ramallah Ghetto,” one of the bishops said.

“In light of the painful reality of the separation fence,” Lehman wrote in his letter to Shalev, “some of the members of the delegation said harsh tings, some of which were not appropriate.” In his letter Lehmann reiterated the heavy responsibility the German people bear due to the Holocaust, and that even those who expressed themselves harshly recognized Israel’s right to defend itself. He said the bishop who made the statement had no intention to compare the past and the present and wrote, “It is impossible to compare current problems with the murder of the Jewish people.”

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/835442.html

Well it’s a relief to see the errors of those uppity German Bishops corrected. They did originally demonstrate a proper understanding of the holy doctrine of “‘Israel’s’ right to exist,” but their comparison of “Jewish” suffering to the suffering of the Palestinians was way beyond the pale! Good Heavens! “Jews” have the Neshama; ie. the “glorious soul” which is a “part of God above.” The Palestinians (and the rest of us non-“Jews,” for that matter) do not have the Neshama. Palestinians only have the Nephesh, or animal soul, which derives from the impure, demonic Kelifa (ie. shells). Therefore, any comparison of Palestinian suffering to that of the “Jews” is an outrageous sacrilege. And perhaps in this context we can understand why Benedict XVI, in his speech at Auschwitz last year stated that the Nazis, “tried to kill God.”

Wouldn’t it be interesting to know exactly how the correction of the German Bishops’ rhetoric came about so quickly. We can safely assume that it was deafening screeching from the ADL, WJC, AJC, EJC, Simon Weisenthal Center, Yad Vashem, and various other Judaic power organizations which initiated the change. But who in Rome made the decision, and how was it handed down? Was it rabbi Walter Cardinal Kasper, president of the Pontifical Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews who handled the matter? And what will the Bishops’ penance be? A pilgrimage to the Holy Site of Auschwitz on their hands and knees? I’ll be watching closely. Time will tell.

Backpeddling Bishops

March 12, 2007

German cardinal sorry for ghetto
remarks

By Eli Ashkenazi

The head of the German Bishops Conference conceded that some statements made by members on a recent visit to Israel and the West Bank were “inappropriate.” Cardinal Karl Lehmann responded a few days ago to a letter sent to him by Avner Shalev, chairman of the Yad Vashem Martyrs and Heroes Remembrance Authority, protesting a statement made a short time after the group visited Yad Vashem earlier this month, and then traveled to Ramallah. “In the morning we saw the Warsaw Ghetto and now it’s the Ramallah Ghetto,” one of the bishops said.

“In light of the painful reality of the separation fence,” Lehman wrote in his letter to Shalev, “some of the members of the delegation said harsh tings, some of which were not appropriate.” In his letter Lehmann reiterated the heavy responsibility the German people bear due to the Holocaust, and that even those who expressed themselves harshly recognized Israel’s right to defend itself. He said the bishop who made the statement had no intention to compare the past and the present and wrote, “It is impossible to compare current problems with the murder of the Jewish people.”

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/835442.html

Well it’s a relief to see the errors of those uppity German Bishops corrected. They did originally demonstrate a proper understanding of the holy doctrine of “‘Israel’s’ right to exist,” but their comparison of “Jewish” suffering to the suffering of the Palestinians was way beyond the pale! Good Heavens! “Jews” have the Neshama; ie. the “glorious soul” which is a “part of God above.” The Palestinians (and the rest of us non-“Jews,” for that matter) do not have the Neshama. Palestinians only have the Nephesh, or animal soul, which derives from the impure, demonic Kelifa (ie. shells). Therefore, any comparison of Palestinian suffering to that of the “Jews” is an outrageous sacrilege. And perhaps in this context we can understand why Benedict XVI, in his speech at Auschwitz last year stated that the Nazis, “tried to kill God.”

Wouldn’t it be interesting to know exactly how the correction of the German Bishops’ rhetoric came about so quickly. We can safely assume that it was deafening screeching from the ADL, WJC, AJC, EJC, Simon Weisenthal Center, Yad Vashem, and various other Judaic power organizations which initiated the change. But who in Rome made the decision, and how was it handed down? Was it rabbi Walter Cardinal Kasper, president of the Pontifical Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews who handled the matter? And what will the Bishops’ penance be? A pilgrimage to the Holy Site of Auschwitz on their hands and knees? I’ll be watching closely. Time will tell.

Walter Kasper’s Mentor: Hassidic Philosopher, Martin Buber

February 28, 2007

“I mention here only the [name] of … Martin Buber, from whom as a young student I learnt so much …” (Walter Cardinal Kasper)

http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/pontifical_councils/chrstuni/card-kasper-docs/rc_pc_chrstuni_doc_20011123_kasper-jews-christians_en.html

Can Hassidic philosopher, Martin Buber be credited as one of the teachers of the philosophical error of immanentism to the generation of immanentists currently populating Rome?

What is well known is Buber’s racist, pantheist (rebadged “panentheist” by him) understanding of Shekinah which he associated with physical “Israel” (i.e. “the Jews”). It would come as no surprise then that Kasper, after having been properly mentored in Judaic self-worship, would turn out to be one of the most valuable Judaic assets in the Vatican working in his capacity as President of the Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews.

Religious relations with “the Jews” have been on the up since Kasper’s appointment as any Catholic schoolchild can tell you after being lectured on the horrible nature of the Christian “teaching of contempt” (see: the Gospel) by an ADL rabbi, an ADL indoctrinated school teacher or through Catholic school teaching material produced by Judaic bankers documented here:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/01/judaics-preach-guilt-in-catholic.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/judaic-lawyerbanker-altering-curriculum.html

Kasper has spoken about Buber’s synthesis of “interfaith dialogue” which has proven so disastrous for Christianity:

“Dialogue” is a relatively new concept in philosophy and in theology as well. It has its roots in the personalistic philosophy of the first half of the 20th century, especially in the Jewish personalistic philosophy of Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, Emanuel Levinas and others. (Walter Kasper, Communion Through Dialogue)

Kasper speaks lovingly of Buber’s diabolical “dialogical thinking”–change synthesized through dialogue–which is simply Hegelian dialectics by another name:

As Martin Buber, one of the most significant representatives of dialogical thinking, says, the truth is located not only in direct subject-object relations but in a “dia”, a “between” which is opened up between the dialogue partners and in which both have a share. Only in the “dia”, the between of a I-thou and a We-relation, do we “have” or, better, do we participate in the objective reality; the subject-object-reality is thus embedded in the subject-subject reality of communication and dialogue. (Walter Kasper, Communion Through Dialogue)

http://www.cmswr.org/nationalassembly/keynotespeaker.htm

With sublime Hassidic philosophical “truths” such as the above en vogue in Rome, it’s no wonder that there’s no longer any place for the clunky old thinking of St. Thomas.

How many of you knew how great the influence the thinking of Hassidic philospher, Martin Buber has been in the disastrous course the Vatican has taken in recent decades?

With that thought in mind, I have two questions for the writers and editors of Latin Mass magazine. I’ve seen that a series of articles has started in the recent edition of Latin Mass on the topic of the philosophical error of immanentism, the first article curiously citing virtually unknown “Hebrew Catholic,” Ronda Chervin as an authority for the Catholic side alongside St. Thomas, Pope St. Pius X and documents from the First Vatican Council.

Will the Judaic component of the subversion of Catholic thinking be addressed as it has been here, or will it continue to be studiously avoided as it traditionally has been in the past by Latin Mass magazine?

If it is the latter, who benefits from that arrangement?

Walter Kasper’s Mentor: Hassidic Philosopher, Martin Buber

February 28, 2007

“I mention here only the [name] of … Martin Buber, from whom as a young student I learnt so much …” (Walter Cardinal Kasper)

http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/pontifical_councils/chrstuni/card-kasper-docs/rc_pc_chrstuni_doc_20011123_kasper-jews-christians_en.html

Can Hassidic philosopher, Martin Buber be credited as one of the teachers of the philosophical error of immanentism to the generation of immanentists currently populating Rome?

What is well known is Buber’s racist, pantheist (rebadged “panentheist” by him) understanding of Shekinah which he associated with physical “Israel” (i.e. “the Jews”). It would come as no surprise then that Kasper, after having been properly mentored in Judaic self-worship, would turn out to be one of the most valuable Judaic assets in the Vatican working in his capacity as President of the Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews.

Religious relations with “the Jews” have been on the up since Kasper’s appointment as any Catholic schoolchild can tell you after being lectured on the horrible nature of the Christian “teaching of contempt” (see: the Gospel) by an ADL rabbi, an ADL indoctrinated school teacher or through Catholic school teaching material produced by Judaic bankers documented here:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/01/judaics-preach-guilt-in-catholic.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/judaic-lawyerbanker-altering-curriculum.html

Kasper has spoken about Buber’s synthesis of “interfaith dialogue” which has proven so disastrous for Christianity:

“Dialogue” is a relatively new concept in philosophy and in theology as well. It has its roots in the personalistic philosophy of the first half of the 20th century, especially in the Jewish personalistic philosophy of Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, Emanuel Levinas and others. (Walter Kasper, Communion Through Dialogue)

Kasper speaks lovingly of Buber’s diabolical “dialogical thinking”–change synthesized through dialogue–which is simply Hegelian dialectics by another name:

As Martin Buber, one of the most significant representatives of dialogical thinking, says, the truth is located not only in direct subject-object relations but in a “dia”, a “between” which is opened up between the dialogue partners and in which both have a share. Only in the “dia”, the between of a I-thou and a We-relation, do we “have” or, better, do we participate in the objective reality; the subject-object-reality is thus embedded in the subject-subject reality of communication and dialogue. (Walter Kasper, Communion Through Dialogue)

http://www.cmswr.org/nationalassembly/keynotespeaker.htm

With sublime Hassidic philosophical “truths” such as the above en vogue in Rome, it’s no wonder that there’s no longer any place for the clunky old thinking of St. Thomas.

How many of you knew how great the influence the thinking of Hassidic philospher, Martin Buber has been in the disastrous course the Vatican has taken in recent decades?

With that thought in mind, I have two questions for the writers and editors of Latin Mass magazine. I’ve seen that a series of articles has started in the recent edition of Latin Mass on the topic of the philosophical error of immanentism, the first article curiously citing virtually unknown “Hebrew Catholic,” Ronda Chervin as an authority for the Catholic side alongside St. Thomas, Pope St. Pius X and documents from the First Vatican Council.

Will the Judaic component of the subversion of Catholic thinking be addressed as it has been here, or will it continue to be studiously avoided as it traditionally has been in the past by Latin Mass magazine?

If it is the latter, who benefits from that arrangement?

Kabbalist Vatican II, "Civil Rights" Change Agent Honored

February 6, 2007

EDITOR’S NOTE: This rabbi always knew where the revolution was going down.


Rabbi Augustin Bea and Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel at a meeting arranged in 1963 by the American Jewish Committee and endorsed by Pope Paul VI.

Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel (2nd from r.) and Martin Luther King, Jr. (4th from r.) in the Selma to Montgomery “Civil Rights” March in 1965.

Rabbi’s legacy of spirituality and activism is guiding light

By G. Jeffrey MacDonald
USA TODAY
01/31/2007

When members of Mishkan Shalom Synagogue in Philadelphia need inspiration to tackle society’s thorny problems, they look no further than a social room named for their late hero: Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel.

It’s a testament to the power of his life and his teaching,” Rabbi Jeff Sultar says. In the room, a hanging photo shows the wild-haired rabbi marching in Selma, Ala., in 1965 with Martin Luther King Jr. “It reminds us that spirituality is continuing to steer us back into the world rather than to take us out of it.”

This year at the centennial of Heschel’s birth, Jews and gentiles alike are remembering him as more than one of the most influential theologians of the 20th century. For people of varied backgrounds, he also is an enduring role model.

For the centennial, academics will debate Heschel’s significance at Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass., on March 11-12. Another conference is Sept. 7-9 at the Thomas Merton Center at Ballarmine University in Louisville. Yale University Press will release Volume 2 of his biography …

Richard John Neuhaus joined with Heschel and peace activist Daniel Berrigan in 1965 to establish the influential anti-war group Clergy Concerned About Vietnam. But today Neuhaus, a Catholic priest and editor of the religion journal First Things, says Heschel’s influence on him and society is most clearly felt in Jewish-Christian relations, which Heschel shaped through his role as Judaic consultant to Vatican II at a time when Heschel’s Hasidic community forbade theological dialogue with Christians.

Born Jan. 11 [I’ll bet], 1907, in Warsaw, Heschel was a religious “prodigy,” Kaplan says. By age 4, he already knew ancient Hebrew and Aramaic; as a teen, he published his first Talmudic commentary …

Full article:

http://www.cjp.org/content_display.html?ArticleID=207542