Archive for the ‘Cardinal Kasper’ Category

‘Jewish’-Catholic Relations Fraud Ver. 2 Plotted at Castel Gandolfo

June 29, 2009

Young Jewish, Catholic leaders meet

June 24, 2009

ROME (JTA) — About 50 young Jewish and Catholic leaders gathered near Rome at a conference sponsored by Vatican and Jewish interfaith bodies.

Some 25 Jewish and 25 Catholic delegates from a number of countries are taking part in what organizers are calling the “first Catholic-Jewish Emerging Leadership Conference to promote and facilitate the next generation of leadership in Catholic-Jewish relations.”

Hosted by the Vatican and convened by the International Catholic-Jewish Liaison Committee, “Discovering Common Values: a Catholic-Jewish Leadership Conference” is taking place at Pope Benedict XVI’s summer residence at Castel Gandolfo.

The program, which ends Thursday, includes seminars about the history of Catholic-Jewish relations, training sessions for Catholic-Jewish engagement, and discussion on issues facing Catholics and Jews today.

http://jta.org/news/article/2009/06/24/1006092/young-jewish-catholic-leaders-meet

***

The International Catholic-Jewish Liaison Committee (ILC)—the convened body of the Holy See’s Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews and the International Jewish Committee on Interreligious Consultations (IJCIC)—is delighted to announce the first Catholic-Jewish Emerging Leadership Conference to promote and facilitate the next generation of leadership in Catholic-Jewish relations.

A Steering Committee of emerging leaders was convened in Budapest, Hungary, from 6 November through 9 November, 2008, just prior to the 20th ILC meeting, also held in Budapest. The group of six Catholic participants and five Jewish participants spent an extended weekend learning from one another, visiting local religious communities, and discussing the program for the upcoming emerging leaders conference. These young leaders then served as full delegates to the ILC meeting—the first formal inclusion of next-generation leaders in this forum. The theme and draft program for the upcoming conference emerged over the course of these meetings.

“Discovering Common Values: A Catholic-Jewish Leadership Conference” is scheduled to take place from 21 June through 25 June, 2009 in Castel Gandolfo, Italy. The conference will include seminars about the history of Catholic-Jewish relations, training sessions for Catholic-Jewish engagement, and an opportunity for participants to identify and discuss the current issues they see facing Catholics and Jews today. The program will also include opportunities for visiting local religious communities and participating in a social action project.

The Conference is expected to be comprised of twenty-five Catholic delegates and twenty-five Jewish delegates. Participants should be between the ages of 20 and 35 and should demonstrate a strong Jewish educational background and a keen commitment to interreligious affairs. Although delegates are not required to be employed in the field of interreligious affairs, this program is specifically targeted towards those who will be able to take the lessons and messages of this conference and extend them to their local networks and communities.

Any questions or comments regarding the Catholic-Jewish Emerging Leadership Conference can be directed to Rabbi Leslie Bergson at (212) 751-4000, x460 or bergsonl@ajc.org.

http://www.ajc.org/atf/cf/%7B42D75369-D582-4380-8395-D25925B85EAF%7D/Castel%20Gandolfo%20EL%20Blurb.doc

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‘Jewish’-Catholic Relations Fraud Ver. 2 Plotted at Castel Gandolfo

June 29, 2009

Young Jewish, Catholic leaders meet

June 24, 2009

ROME (JTA) — About 50 young Jewish and Catholic leaders gathered near Rome at a conference sponsored by Vatican and Jewish interfaith bodies.

Some 25 Jewish and 25 Catholic delegates from a number of countries are taking part in what organizers are calling the “first Catholic-Jewish Emerging Leadership Conference to promote and facilitate the next generation of leadership in Catholic-Jewish relations.”

Hosted by the Vatican and convened by the International Catholic-Jewish Liaison Committee, “Discovering Common Values: a Catholic-Jewish Leadership Conference” is taking place at Pope Benedict XVI’s summer residence at Castel Gandolfo.

The program, which ends Thursday, includes seminars about the history of Catholic-Jewish relations, training sessions for Catholic-Jewish engagement, and discussion on issues facing Catholics and Jews today.

http://jta.org/news/article/2009/06/24/1006092/young-jewish-catholic-leaders-meet

***

The International Catholic-Jewish Liaison Committee (ILC)—the convened body of the Holy See’s Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews and the International Jewish Committee on Interreligious Consultations (IJCIC)—is delighted to announce the first Catholic-Jewish Emerging Leadership Conference to promote and facilitate the next generation of leadership in Catholic-Jewish relations.

A Steering Committee of emerging leaders was convened in Budapest, Hungary, from 6 November through 9 November, 2008, just prior to the 20th ILC meeting, also held in Budapest. The group of six Catholic participants and five Jewish participants spent an extended weekend learning from one another, visiting local religious communities, and discussing the program for the upcoming emerging leaders conference. These young leaders then served as full delegates to the ILC meeting—the first formal inclusion of next-generation leaders in this forum. The theme and draft program for the upcoming conference emerged over the course of these meetings.

“Discovering Common Values: A Catholic-Jewish Leadership Conference” is scheduled to take place from 21 June through 25 June, 2009 in Castel Gandolfo, Italy. The conference will include seminars about the history of Catholic-Jewish relations, training sessions for Catholic-Jewish engagement, and an opportunity for participants to identify and discuss the current issues they see facing Catholics and Jews today. The program will also include opportunities for visiting local religious communities and participating in a social action project.

The Conference is expected to be comprised of twenty-five Catholic delegates and twenty-five Jewish delegates. Participants should be between the ages of 20 and 35 and should demonstrate a strong Jewish educational background and a keen commitment to interreligious affairs. Although delegates are not required to be employed in the field of interreligious affairs, this program is specifically targeted towards those who will be able to take the lessons and messages of this conference and extend them to their local networks and communities.

Any questions or comments regarding the Catholic-Jewish Emerging Leadership Conference can be directed to Rabbi Leslie Bergson at (212) 751-4000, x460 or bergsonl@ajc.org.

http://www.ajc.org/atf/cf/%7B42D75369-D582-4380-8395-D25925B85EAF%7D/Castel%20Gandolfo%20EL%20Blurb.doc

Cardinals Kasper, O’Malley Enshrine "Holocaust" in Boston

March 25, 2009
“No Holocaust denial — which is a new injustice to the victims — can be allowed or permitted … “It’s absolutely clear that a Holocaust denier can’t have a room, a space in the Catholic church,””


Top Vatican liaison to Jews rededicates Massachusetts menorah in memory of Holocaust victims

March 25, 2009

Michael Paulson – Boston Globe

BRAINTREE _ With a touch of flickering flame to the top of a bronze candelabrum, a key Vatican official today sought to reassure the Jewish community that there is no room in the Catholic church for anti-Semitism or Holocaust denial.

Cardinal Walter Kasper, who is Pope Benedict XVI’s top advisor on Catholic-Jewish relations, yesterday visited the headquarters of the Archdiocese of Boston and took several steps to calm the controversy that has erupted since the pope lifted the excommunication of four traditionalist bishops, one of whom denies that the Nazis used gas chambers to kill Jews. Over a salmon lunch with 50 Jewish community leaders, Kasper fielded a series of tough questions about the Vatican’s actions; he then joined a ceremony to rededicate a Holocaust memorial, originally located at the former archdiocesan headquarters in Brighton, which depicts six men and women holding torches to represent the six million Jews killed during World War II.

“The memory of what happened, now 65 years ago, can not be forgotten,” Kasper told a crowd of about 200 at the rededication ceremony, including multiple priests and rabbis, several Holocaust survivors, and the consuls-general of Israel and Germany. “No Holocaust denial — which is a new injustice to the victims — can be allowed or permitted.”

But the raw emotions exposed by the controversy over Bishop Richard Williamson of the Society of St. Pius X were clear. Israel Arbeiter, the president of the Boston chapter of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, recounted the deaths of his parents and brother in concentration camps, and his own witnessing of the remains of Jews killed in gas chambers at Auschwitz-Birkenau, before addressing Kasper and saying, “Your Eminence, pain and suffering have been inflicted again on the Holocaust survivors by a representative of the church, namely, Bishop Williamson, and by the action and inaction by Pope Benedict XVI.”

Arbeiter also praised the Catholic church, calling the visit of Kasper “deeply meaningful,” referring to Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley of Boston as a friend, and saying that the pope has taken a number of constructive steps in recent weeks to address the controversy. But he said he would like to hear the pope directly refute the claim by Williamson that gas chambers were not used by the Nazis.

“Sixty-nine years after the liberation of Auschwitz, with all the available documentation, confirmation by the German government, testimony by the perpetrators, Bishop Williamson still denies the truth, the fact of the Holocaust,” he said. “…I will never understand that he denies that there were ever gas chambers, that Jewish people were gassed and murdered…I wonder whether Bishop Williamson knows where my parents and my brother are.”

Local Jewish and Catholic community leaders said they viewed Kasper’s visit as a significant development, in that it affirmed the high priority the Vatican places on Catholic-Jewish relations.

“Words are helpful, but actions like today’s re-dedication are more powerful, more meaningful, and more enduring,” said Derrek L. Shulman, New England regional director of the Anti-Defamation League. “We welcome and celebrate this day as a major step forward for strengthening relations between Jews and Catholics in the Boston area.”

O’Malley, who organized the event, called the Holocaust “the greatest act of inhumanity ever perpetrated on this planet,” and said yesterday’s event was intended “to assure the entire community of the Holy Father and the church’s commitment to furthering these wonderful relationships that have been cultivated the last decades.” O’Malley noted that Catholic-Jewish relations in Boston have been strong since the days of Cardinal Richard J. Cushing, who in the 1960s helped draft a pivotal document at the Second Vatican Council that repudiated the basis for Christian anti-Semitism.

Kasper said that the outcry from Catholics irate over Williamson’s remarks, and over the Vatican’s action, was evidence that Catholics have internalized the importance of Catholic-Jewish relations. And Nancy K. Kaufman, the executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council, said that the response to the uproar had provided evidence of the overall strength of the Jewish-Catholic relationship, noting the speed and candor with which local leaders had been able to meet and talk.

“It speaks to the power of the relationship that we have worked on so hard in this community over 40 or 50 years,” Kaufman said. “Some of us here today can remember a time when relations between Catholics and Jews in Boston were not so good, and we didn’t have the ability to have an honest and open dialogue among and between each other, and I think the ability to raise difficult issues like this one, and to have the discussion…speaks to the strength of the relationship.”

http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles_of_faith/2009/03/kasper_in_brain.html

Top Vatican liaison to Jews rededicates Massachusetts menorah in memory of Holocaust victims

JAY LINDSAY – Associated Press – BRAINTREE, Mass.

March 25, 2009

… Cardinal Walter Kasper joined Holocaust survivors and local Roman Catholic leaders at the ceremony for the Yom Hashoah Menorah at the Boston Archdiocese’s Braintree offices.

Kasper said the ceremony was a reminder of “the most atrocious event of the last century.”

“No Holocaust denial, which is a new injustice to the victims, can be allowed or permitted,” Kasper said. “The memory must be a … memory for the future we hand down to future generations.”

The menorah was dedicated in 2002 at the archdiocese’s former campus in Brighton, but the archdiocese recently moved to Braintree after selling its land to neighboring Boston College to relieve debt. Cardinal Sean O’Malley, the Boston archbishop, suggested the rededication ceremony in Braintree after meeting with local Jewish leaders angered by the Vatican’s January decision to lift the excommunication of Bishop Richard Williamson …

At a press conference after the ceremony, Kasper emphasized that though Williamson’s excommunication was lifted, he can’t be fully restored into the church unless he renounces his views.

“It’s absolutely clear that a Holocaust denier can’t have a room, a space in the Catholic church,” Kasper said …

Auschwitz survivor Israel Arbeiter on Wednesday called on the pope to emphatically state that millions of people died in gas chambers. Arbeiter said that his parents were murdered in the chambers in the Treblinka death camp and that he saw thousands led into Auschwitz’s chambers, leaving behind “only their clothing, their ashes and crushed bones.”

“We stand together against those who today conspire to repeat history even as they deny that very history,” said Arbeiter, president of the Boston area chapter of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors.

Arbeiter was joined by his son and grandson as he lit one of six candles on the menorah, representing the 6 million Jews who perished in the Holocaust.

The menorah depicts six people holding torches on a base of a cracked Star of David. A holy man with a prayer book stands in front of them, with a child to the side.

The original Yom Hashoah Menorah was placed at the North American College in Vatican City in 1999. At the time, Pope John Paul II backed a proposal to place replicas of these menorahs in Catholic centers as a sign of reconciliation and to spur Holocaust study programs.

The menorahs have since been placed in cities around the country, including Dallas, Miami and Baltimore.

http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/event/apArticle/id/D975ADOG0/

See also:

Xavier University Gets Even More Kosher

Bishop Rhoades Observed “Yom HaShoah”

Vatican to Move Rabbinic Subversion Beyond the Clergy and Into the Pews

Cardinals Kasper, O’Malley Enshrine "Holocaust" in Boston

March 25, 2009
“No Holocaust denial — which is a new injustice to the victims — can be allowed or permitted … “It’s absolutely clear that a Holocaust denier can’t have a room, a space in the Catholic church,””


Top Vatican liaison to Jews rededicates Massachusetts menorah in memory of Holocaust victims

March 25, 2009

Michael Paulson – Boston Globe

BRAINTREE _ With a touch of flickering flame to the top of a bronze candelabrum, a key Vatican official today sought to reassure the Jewish community that there is no room in the Catholic church for anti-Semitism or Holocaust denial.

Cardinal Walter Kasper, who is Pope Benedict XVI’s top advisor on Catholic-Jewish relations, yesterday visited the headquarters of the Archdiocese of Boston and took several steps to calm the controversy that has erupted since the pope lifted the excommunication of four traditionalist bishops, one of whom denies that the Nazis used gas chambers to kill Jews. Over a salmon lunch with 50 Jewish community leaders, Kasper fielded a series of tough questions about the Vatican’s actions; he then joined a ceremony to rededicate a Holocaust memorial, originally located at the former archdiocesan headquarters in Brighton, which depicts six men and women holding torches to represent the six million Jews killed during World War II.

“The memory of what happened, now 65 years ago, can not be forgotten,” Kasper told a crowd of about 200 at the rededication ceremony, including multiple priests and rabbis, several Holocaust survivors, and the consuls-general of Israel and Germany. “No Holocaust denial — which is a new injustice to the victims — can be allowed or permitted.”

But the raw emotions exposed by the controversy over Bishop Richard Williamson of the Society of St. Pius X were clear. Israel Arbeiter, the president of the Boston chapter of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, recounted the deaths of his parents and brother in concentration camps, and his own witnessing of the remains of Jews killed in gas chambers at Auschwitz-Birkenau, before addressing Kasper and saying, “Your Eminence, pain and suffering have been inflicted again on the Holocaust survivors by a representative of the church, namely, Bishop Williamson, and by the action and inaction by Pope Benedict XVI.”

Arbeiter also praised the Catholic church, calling the visit of Kasper “deeply meaningful,” referring to Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley of Boston as a friend, and saying that the pope has taken a number of constructive steps in recent weeks to address the controversy. But he said he would like to hear the pope directly refute the claim by Williamson that gas chambers were not used by the Nazis.

“Sixty-nine years after the liberation of Auschwitz, with all the available documentation, confirmation by the German government, testimony by the perpetrators, Bishop Williamson still denies the truth, the fact of the Holocaust,” he said. “…I will never understand that he denies that there were ever gas chambers, that Jewish people were gassed and murdered…I wonder whether Bishop Williamson knows where my parents and my brother are.”

Local Jewish and Catholic community leaders said they viewed Kasper’s visit as a significant development, in that it affirmed the high priority the Vatican places on Catholic-Jewish relations.

“Words are helpful, but actions like today’s re-dedication are more powerful, more meaningful, and more enduring,” said Derrek L. Shulman, New England regional director of the Anti-Defamation League. “We welcome and celebrate this day as a major step forward for strengthening relations between Jews and Catholics in the Boston area.”

O’Malley, who organized the event, called the Holocaust “the greatest act of inhumanity ever perpetrated on this planet,” and said yesterday’s event was intended “to assure the entire community of the Holy Father and the church’s commitment to furthering these wonderful relationships that have been cultivated the last decades.” O’Malley noted that Catholic-Jewish relations in Boston have been strong since the days of Cardinal Richard J. Cushing, who in the 1960s helped draft a pivotal document at the Second Vatican Council that repudiated the basis for Christian anti-Semitism.

Kasper said that the outcry from Catholics irate over Williamson’s remarks, and over the Vatican’s action, was evidence that Catholics have internalized the importance of Catholic-Jewish relations. And Nancy K. Kaufman, the executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council, said that the response to the uproar had provided evidence of the overall strength of the Jewish-Catholic relationship, noting the speed and candor with which local leaders had been able to meet and talk.

“It speaks to the power of the relationship that we have worked on so hard in this community over 40 or 50 years,” Kaufman said. “Some of us here today can remember a time when relations between Catholics and Jews in Boston were not so good, and we didn’t have the ability to have an honest and open dialogue among and between each other, and I think the ability to raise difficult issues like this one, and to have the discussion…speaks to the strength of the relationship.”

http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles_of_faith/2009/03/kasper_in_brain.html

Top Vatican liaison to Jews rededicates Massachusetts menorah in memory of Holocaust victims

JAY LINDSAY – Associated Press – BRAINTREE, Mass.

March 25, 2009

… Cardinal Walter Kasper joined Holocaust survivors and local Roman Catholic leaders at the ceremony for the Yom Hashoah Menorah at the Boston Archdiocese’s Braintree offices.

Kasper said the ceremony was a reminder of “the most atrocious event of the last century.”

“No Holocaust denial, which is a new injustice to the victims, can be allowed or permitted,” Kasper said. “The memory must be a … memory for the future we hand down to future generations.”

The menorah was dedicated in 2002 at the archdiocese’s former campus in Brighton, but the archdiocese recently moved to Braintree after selling its land to neighboring Boston College to relieve debt. Cardinal Sean O’Malley, the Boston archbishop, suggested the rededication ceremony in Braintree after meeting with local Jewish leaders angered by the Vatican’s January decision to lift the excommunication of Bishop Richard Williamson …

At a press conference after the ceremony, Kasper emphasized that though Williamson’s excommunication was lifted, he can’t be fully restored into the church unless he renounces his views.

“It’s absolutely clear that a Holocaust denier can’t have a room, a space in the Catholic church,” Kasper said …

Auschwitz survivor Israel Arbeiter on Wednesday called on the pope to emphatically state that millions of people died in gas chambers. Arbeiter said that his parents were murdered in the chambers in the Treblinka death camp and that he saw thousands led into Auschwitz’s chambers, leaving behind “only their clothing, their ashes and crushed bones.”

“We stand together against those who today conspire to repeat history even as they deny that very history,” said Arbeiter, president of the Boston area chapter of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors.

Arbeiter was joined by his son and grandson as he lit one of six candles on the menorah, representing the 6 million Jews who perished in the Holocaust.

The menorah depicts six people holding torches on a base of a cracked Star of David. A holy man with a prayer book stands in front of them, with a child to the side.

The original Yom Hashoah Menorah was placed at the North American College in Vatican City in 1999. At the time, Pope John Paul II backed a proposal to place replicas of these menorahs in Catholic centers as a sign of reconciliation and to spur Holocaust study programs.

The menorahs have since been placed in cities around the country, including Dallas, Miami and Baltimore.

http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/event/apArticle/id/D975ADOG0/

See also:

Xavier University Gets Even More Kosher

Bishop Rhoades Observed “Yom HaShoah”

Vatican to Move Rabbinic Subversion Beyond the Clergy and Into the Pews

Cardinals Kasper, O’Malley Enshrine "Holocaust" in Boston

March 25, 2009
“No Holocaust denial — which is a new injustice to the victims — can be allowed or permitted … “It’s absolutely clear that a Holocaust denier can’t have a room, a space in the Catholic church,””


Top Vatican liaison to Jews rededicates Massachusetts menorah in memory of Holocaust victims

March 25, 2009

Michael Paulson – Boston Globe

BRAINTREE _ With a touch of flickering flame to the top of a bronze candelabrum, a key Vatican official today sought to reassure the Jewish community that there is no room in the Catholic church for anti-Semitism or Holocaust denial.

Cardinal Walter Kasper, who is Pope Benedict XVI’s top advisor on Catholic-Jewish relations, yesterday visited the headquarters of the Archdiocese of Boston and took several steps to calm the controversy that has erupted since the pope lifted the excommunication of four traditionalist bishops, one of whom denies that the Nazis used gas chambers to kill Jews. Over a salmon lunch with 50 Jewish community leaders, Kasper fielded a series of tough questions about the Vatican’s actions; he then joined a ceremony to rededicate a Holocaust memorial, originally located at the former archdiocesan headquarters in Brighton, which depicts six men and women holding torches to represent the six million Jews killed during World War II.

“The memory of what happened, now 65 years ago, can not be forgotten,” Kasper told a crowd of about 200 at the rededication ceremony, including multiple priests and rabbis, several Holocaust survivors, and the consuls-general of Israel and Germany. “No Holocaust denial — which is a new injustice to the victims — can be allowed or permitted.”

But the raw emotions exposed by the controversy over Bishop Richard Williamson of the Society of St. Pius X were clear. Israel Arbeiter, the president of the Boston chapter of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, recounted the deaths of his parents and brother in concentration camps, and his own witnessing of the remains of Jews killed in gas chambers at Auschwitz-Birkenau, before addressing Kasper and saying, “Your Eminence, pain and suffering have been inflicted again on the Holocaust survivors by a representative of the church, namely, Bishop Williamson, and by the action and inaction by Pope Benedict XVI.”

Arbeiter also praised the Catholic church, calling the visit of Kasper “deeply meaningful,” referring to Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley of Boston as a friend, and saying that the pope has taken a number of constructive steps in recent weeks to address the controversy. But he said he would like to hear the pope directly refute the claim by Williamson that gas chambers were not used by the Nazis.

“Sixty-nine years after the liberation of Auschwitz, with all the available documentation, confirmation by the German government, testimony by the perpetrators, Bishop Williamson still denies the truth, the fact of the Holocaust,” he said. “…I will never understand that he denies that there were ever gas chambers, that Jewish people were gassed and murdered…I wonder whether Bishop Williamson knows where my parents and my brother are.”

Local Jewish and Catholic community leaders said they viewed Kasper’s visit as a significant development, in that it affirmed the high priority the Vatican places on Catholic-Jewish relations.

“Words are helpful, but actions like today’s re-dedication are more powerful, more meaningful, and more enduring,” said Derrek L. Shulman, New England regional director of the Anti-Defamation League. “We welcome and celebrate this day as a major step forward for strengthening relations between Jews and Catholics in the Boston area.”

O’Malley, who organized the event, called the Holocaust “the greatest act of inhumanity ever perpetrated on this planet,” and said yesterday’s event was intended “to assure the entire community of the Holy Father and the church’s commitment to furthering these wonderful relationships that have been cultivated the last decades.” O’Malley noted that Catholic-Jewish relations in Boston have been strong since the days of Cardinal Richard J. Cushing, who in the 1960s helped draft a pivotal document at the Second Vatican Council that repudiated the basis for Christian anti-Semitism.

Kasper said that the outcry from Catholics irate over Williamson’s remarks, and over the Vatican’s action, was evidence that Catholics have internalized the importance of Catholic-Jewish relations. And Nancy K. Kaufman, the executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council, said that the response to the uproar had provided evidence of the overall strength of the Jewish-Catholic relationship, noting the speed and candor with which local leaders had been able to meet and talk.

“It speaks to the power of the relationship that we have worked on so hard in this community over 40 or 50 years,” Kaufman said. “Some of us here today can remember a time when relations between Catholics and Jews in Boston were not so good, and we didn’t have the ability to have an honest and open dialogue among and between each other, and I think the ability to raise difficult issues like this one, and to have the discussion…speaks to the strength of the relationship.”

http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles_of_faith/2009/03/kasper_in_brain.html

Top Vatican liaison to Jews rededicates Massachusetts menorah in memory of Holocaust victims

JAY LINDSAY – Associated Press – BRAINTREE, Mass.

March 25, 2009

… Cardinal Walter Kasper joined Holocaust survivors and local Roman Catholic leaders at the ceremony for the Yom Hashoah Menorah at the Boston Archdiocese’s Braintree offices.

Kasper said the ceremony was a reminder of “the most atrocious event of the last century.”

“No Holocaust denial, which is a new injustice to the victims, can be allowed or permitted,” Kasper said. “The memory must be a … memory for the future we hand down to future generations.”

The menorah was dedicated in 2002 at the archdiocese’s former campus in Brighton, but the archdiocese recently moved to Braintree after selling its land to neighboring Boston College to relieve debt. Cardinal Sean O’Malley, the Boston archbishop, suggested the rededication ceremony in Braintree after meeting with local Jewish leaders angered by the Vatican’s January decision to lift the excommunication of Bishop Richard Williamson …

At a press conference after the ceremony, Kasper emphasized that though Williamson’s excommunication was lifted, he can’t be fully restored into the church unless he renounces his views.

“It’s absolutely clear that a Holocaust denier can’t have a room, a space in the Catholic church,” Kasper said …

Auschwitz survivor Israel Arbeiter on Wednesday called on the pope to emphatically state that millions of people died in gas chambers. Arbeiter said that his parents were murdered in the chambers in the Treblinka death camp and that he saw thousands led into Auschwitz’s chambers, leaving behind “only their clothing, their ashes and crushed bones.”

“We stand together against those who today conspire to repeat history even as they deny that very history,” said Arbeiter, president of the Boston area chapter of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors.

Arbeiter was joined by his son and grandson as he lit one of six candles on the menorah, representing the 6 million Jews who perished in the Holocaust.

The menorah depicts six people holding torches on a base of a cracked Star of David. A holy man with a prayer book stands in front of them, with a child to the side.

The original Yom Hashoah Menorah was placed at the North American College in Vatican City in 1999. At the time, Pope John Paul II backed a proposal to place replicas of these menorahs in Catholic centers as a sign of reconciliation and to spur Holocaust study programs.

The menorahs have since been placed in cities around the country, including Dallas, Miami and Baltimore.

http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/event/apArticle/id/D975ADOG0/

See also:

Xavier University Gets Even More Kosher

Bishop Rhoades Observed “Yom HaShoah”

Vatican to Move Rabbinic Subversion Beyond the Clergy and Into the Pews

Vatican to Issue Clarification as Requested by Pharisees

March 5, 2008

Catholic Church Conservation blog has offered this translation of a Radio Vatikan communication:

http://cathcon.blogspot.com/2008/03/cardinal-kasper-expects-end-soon-to.html

In the dispute over the Catholic Good Friday intercession, Curial Cardinal Walter Kasper expects a conciliatory solution. He is in contact with leading Jewish representatives , Kasper said on Tuesday. In the coming days, he will talk about the process with the Chief Rabbi of Jerusalem, who moreover, wished to meet with Cardinal Secretary of State Tarcisio Bertone. There will then be a statement. Then the process should be settled, said Kasper.

In early February, Pope published a new version of the intercession for the Jews in the Good Friday liturgy in the extraordinary Latin rite which generated fierce opposition from Jewish representatives. It says that the Jews should recognise Jesus Christ as saviour of all people . Critics feared a retrograde step in Catholic-Jewish dialogue. The Curial cardinal spoke at the presentation in the Vatican of a commemorative book for his 75th Birthday .

Vatican to Issue Clarification as Requested by Pharisees

March 5, 2008

Catholic Church Conservation blog has offered this translation of a Radio Vatikan communication:

http://cathcon.blogspot.com/2008/03/cardinal-kasper-expects-end-soon-to.html

In the dispute over the Catholic Good Friday intercession, Curial Cardinal Walter Kasper expects a conciliatory solution. He is in contact with leading Jewish representatives , Kasper said on Tuesday. In the coming days, he will talk about the process with the Chief Rabbi of Jerusalem, who moreover, wished to meet with Cardinal Secretary of State Tarcisio Bertone. There will then be a statement. Then the process should be settled, said Kasper.

In early February, Pope published a new version of the intercession for the Jews in the Good Friday liturgy in the extraordinary Latin rite which generated fierce opposition from Jewish representatives. It says that the Jews should recognise Jesus Christ as saviour of all people . Critics feared a retrograde step in Catholic-Jewish dialogue. The Curial cardinal spoke at the presentation in the Vatican of a commemorative book for his 75th Birthday .

Cardinal Kasper Publicly Appeals to Jules Isaac

February 28, 2008

Walter Kasper speaking on Radio Vatikan, February 7, 2008, publicly states that he agrees with the “teaching of contempt” thesis of Jules Isaac whose seething contempt for Christianity saturates his strange books and whose zeal for altering Christian teachings and tradition is still unmatched.

Speaking of Benedict’s Latin prayer for the Jews, Kasper says:

“If the prayer speaks of the ‘conversion’ of the Jews, this does not mean we are embarking on a ‘mission’. As a matter of fact, the pope is quoting St. Paul’s Epistle to the Romans. In chapter 11, St. Paul tells us that we hope that when the fullness of the Gentiles shall come into the Church all Israel also shall be saved. It is an eschatological hope. This does not mean we are embarking on a mission: we must give witness to our faith, this is clear. But, I want to say this: in the past, such a language was often fraught with contempt, as Jules Isaac, a well-know Jew, rightly said. But, today, there is respect in the diversity which exists between us. Now there is respect and no longer contempt. (Cardinal Kasper, speaking on Radio Vatikan, February 7, 2008)

http://www.dici.org/actualite_read.php?id=1164&loc=us

For those seeking to understand the mind of Vatican prelates in this area, I strongly recommend the reading of Jules Isaac’s, Jesus and Israel and/or Judaism and the Vatican,
by Vicomte Leon De Poncis which quotes Jules Isaac’s writings extensively. Therein you will come to understand the foundation of Judeo-Christian dialogue laid by Jules Isaac when he wrote Jesus and Israel in 1946 and immediately began organizing conferences between rabbis and priests sympathetic to his cause dedicated to changing Christian teaching and tradition to his specification.

Those who warn that there is a danger that a “precedent may be set” of organizations hostile to the faith bringing about changes in matters of Catholic faith are either woefully ignorant of the past, have no memory, or are intentionally misleading people.

Cardinal Kasper Publicly Appeals to Jules Isaac

February 28, 2008

Walter Kasper speaking on Radio Vatikan, February 7, 2008, publicly states that he agrees with the “teaching of contempt” thesis of Jules Isaac whose seething contempt for Christianity saturates his strange books and whose zeal for altering Christian teachings and tradition is still unmatched.

Speaking of Benedict’s Latin prayer for the Jews, Kasper says:

“If the prayer speaks of the ‘conversion’ of the Jews, this does not mean we are embarking on a ‘mission’. As a matter of fact, the pope is quoting St. Paul’s Epistle to the Romans. In chapter 11, St. Paul tells us that we hope that when the fullness of the Gentiles shall come into the Church all Israel also shall be saved. It is an eschatological hope. This does not mean we are embarking on a mission: we must give witness to our faith, this is clear. But, I want to say this: in the past, such a language was often fraught with contempt, as Jules Isaac, a well-know Jew, rightly said. But, today, there is respect in the diversity which exists between us. Now there is respect and no longer contempt. (Cardinal Kasper, speaking on Radio Vatikan, February 7, 2008)

http://www.dici.org/actualite_read.php?id=1164&loc=us

For those seeking to understand the mind of Vatican prelates in this area, I strongly recommend the reading of Jules Isaac’s, Jesus and Israel and/or Judaism and the Vatican,
by Vicomte Leon De Poncis which quotes Jules Isaac’s writings extensively. Therein you will come to understand the foundation of Judeo-Christian dialogue laid by Jules Isaac when he wrote Jesus and Israel in 1946 and immediately began organizing conferences between rabbis and priests sympathetic to his cause dedicated to changing Christian teaching and tradition to his specification.

Those who warn that there is a danger that a “precedent may be set” of organizations hostile to the faith bringing about changes in matters of Catholic faith are either woefully ignorant of the past, have no memory, or are intentionally misleading people.

Walter Kasper Clarifies Intention of Benedict’s Latin Prayer for the Jews to Chief Pharisee David Rosen

February 17, 2008

Cardinal Walter Kasper, President of the Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews, has written a letter clarifying the intention of the new Good Friday prayer for the Jews at the request of the Chief Rabbi of “Israel,” and papal knight, David Rosen of which I present some excerpts. First, we see it implied by a top Vatican prelate that the Scripture-based traditional Latin Good Friday prayer for the Jews was “language of contempt” while it is stated that the new prayer expresses an intention of “mutual respect in respective otherness”:

“To give witness of our Christian faith, as is expressed in the reformulated prayer, is therefore in no way a return to the language of contempt but an expression of mutual respect in our respective otherness.”

What is the intention of the reformulated prayer?

The reformulated text no longer speaks about the conversion of the Jews, as some Jewish critics wrongly affirm. The text is a prayer inspired by St. Paul’s letter to the Romans, chapter 11, which is the very text which speaks of the unbroken covenant. It takes up Paul’s eschatological hope that at the end of times all Israel will be saved. As a prayer the text lays all in the hands of God and not in ours. It says nothing about the how and when. Therefore there is nothing about missionary activities, by which we may take Israel’s salvation in our own hands. We leave all in the hands of the one who is the only master and Lord of history.

Does this prayer constitute any change in the Vatican’s policy towards the elder brothers?

It is absolutely not the intention of anyone in the Roman Curia to step back and interrupt our fruitful dialogue, which for us is irreversible …(Letter from Cardinal Walter Kasper, President of the Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews, to Chief Rabbi of “Israel,” David Rosen)

A photocopy of the letter can be read at the following link:

http://www.sidic.org/doc/DOC00353_Doc00558.pdf

There you have it, not from some hack lay theologian, but from one of the highest ranking Vatican prelates, expert in Benedict’s theology of the “elder brothers” and Benedict’s liaison to the Pharisees. If this anti-Gospel intention resonates with you, then sign up here to defend it:

Defend the Dogma, Defend the Holy Father!

And it’s worth noting that one of Benedict’s first actions as Pope was to make the self-described proud Pharisee, Chief Rabbi of “Israel,” David Rosen, whom this letter is addressed to, a papal knight.

See:

The Vatican’s Knight Defenders of the Talmud

Papal Rabbi-Knight David Rosen Wants to Change What Christians Believe About the Pharisees