Archive for the ‘Anti-Gospel’ Category

Lansdale Catholic High School Wins "Generous, Coveted Prize" for Excellence in Holocaustolatry

July 2, 2009

The Noahide faith is strong at this formerly Catholic High School.

Holocaust Arts Contest as a Way to Teach Tolerance

July 02, 2009

Lynn B. Edelman – Jewish Federation Feature

Eileen Hildenbrand, chairperson of the English Department at Lansdale Catholic High School, expressed her delight at learning that her school will soon receive a coveted prize from the sponsors of the recent Mordechai Anielewicz Creative Arts Competition on the Holocaust — the Clara Isaacman Memorial Holocaust Trunk: “This generous gift, valued at more than $1,500, will provide our students with a wealth of Holocaust educational materials that we did not currently have, and will be utilized by our students in a variety of subjects.”

Hildenbrand explained that the Holocaust is explored through the prism of many subject areas at the school, including English, social studies and theology.

“It is an important topic for our students, who are not only United States citizens, but also citizens of the world,” she said, adding that “since we are a Catholic school, our students need to learn about other groups.”

Hildenbrand said she hopes that this knowledge will help to promote tolerance, understanding and respect for others.

She also said that she believes the motto so closely associated with Holocaust education — “Remember not to forget” — has great relevance in today’s society.

“Genocide is a current problem in many parts of the world; perhaps we can learn from the past how to address this issue today,” she pondered.

This is the third time Hildenbrand’s students have been honored by the competition’s judges.

“We encourage our students to enter because it is through the arts that students can explore and express their feelings,” she said.

Students in her English I class created commemorative postage stamps to honor those lost in the Holocaust and/or those Righteous Gentiles who acted to prevent the loss of Jewish lives.

Hildenbrand emphasized that “the role of the Righteous Gentile [see: Noahide] is especially relevant for our students.”

This project was the culminating activity in the students’ exploration of the Holocaust. In preparation, they read The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank and Number the Stars by Lois Lowry. Seniors viewed the movie “Schindler’s List,” while freshmen saw “Miracle at Midnight” to emphasize the role that many Christians played in saving friends and neighbors from the hands of the Nazis.

To help these young people understand the concept of 6 million Holocaust victims, several student groups also saw “Paper Clips,” a movie that documented one school’s project to collect one paper clip for each Jewish life lost.

Hildenbrand’s colleague, Elizabeth Burgoon, helped her senior class to create scrapbooks that marked the lives of various fictional people who lived during the Holocaust through letters and pictures. To prepare for this competition entry, students read Night by Elie Weisel and The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, a book by Irish novelist John Boyne that was recently made into an award-winning movie.

Throughout the course of their school experience, the Catholic students will have much exposures to Holocaust studies, as well as ample opportunity for discussion. Said Hildenbrand: “We are trying to help them gain knowledge about a very dark period in history and learn from the past how to create a better world.”

The multimedia entries from Lansdale Catholic High School students and other competition participants were displayed from June 3 through June 15 at the Moore College of Art & Design.

Award winners were honored during a ceremony at the college on June 8.

The Mordechai Anielewicz Creative Arts Competition, now in its 36th year, provides students in grades seven to 12, of all religious and ethnic backgrounds, with a chance to respond to the Holocaust and its related issues through creative expression. Students are encouraged to submit original written, musical, art, film and creative dance works that focus on Holocaust themes.

The contest is sponsored by the Memorial Committee for the Six Million Jewish Martyrs of the Jewish Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia and the Auerbach Central Agency for Jewish Education, in cooperation with the Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, Sons and Daughters of Holocaust Survivors, Children of Jewish Holocaust Survivors Association of Philadelphia, Samuel Pelta Holocaust Education Endowment, Jewish Publication Society and Moore College of Art & Design. It is named in honor of Mordechai Anielewicz, the 19-year-old leader of the Jewish revolt against the Nazis in the Warsaw ghetto.

For more information, call Beth Razin at Federation: 215-832-0536 (e-mail: brazin@jfgp.org).

http://www.jewishexponent.com/article/19151/

Lansdale Catholic High School Wins "Generous, Coveted Prize" for Excellence in Holocaustolatry

July 2, 2009

The Noahide faith is strong at this formerly Catholic High School.

Holocaust Arts Contest as a Way to Teach Tolerance

July 02, 2009

Lynn B. Edelman – Jewish Federation Feature

Eileen Hildenbrand, chairperson of the English Department at Lansdale Catholic High School, expressed her delight at learning that her school will soon receive a coveted prize from the sponsors of the recent Mordechai Anielewicz Creative Arts Competition on the Holocaust — the Clara Isaacman Memorial Holocaust Trunk: “This generous gift, valued at more than $1,500, will provide our students with a wealth of Holocaust educational materials that we did not currently have, and will be utilized by our students in a variety of subjects.”

Hildenbrand explained that the Holocaust is explored through the prism of many subject areas at the school, including English, social studies and theology.

“It is an important topic for our students, who are not only United States citizens, but also citizens of the world,” she said, adding that “since we are a Catholic school, our students need to learn about other groups.”

Hildenbrand said she hopes that this knowledge will help to promote tolerance, understanding and respect for others.

She also said that she believes the motto so closely associated with Holocaust education — “Remember not to forget” — has great relevance in today’s society.

“Genocide is a current problem in many parts of the world; perhaps we can learn from the past how to address this issue today,” she pondered.

This is the third time Hildenbrand’s students have been honored by the competition’s judges.

“We encourage our students to enter because it is through the arts that students can explore and express their feelings,” she said.

Students in her English I class created commemorative postage stamps to honor those lost in the Holocaust and/or those Righteous Gentiles who acted to prevent the loss of Jewish lives.

Hildenbrand emphasized that “the role of the Righteous Gentile [see: Noahide] is especially relevant for our students.”

This project was the culminating activity in the students’ exploration of the Holocaust. In preparation, they read The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank and Number the Stars by Lois Lowry. Seniors viewed the movie “Schindler’s List,” while freshmen saw “Miracle at Midnight” to emphasize the role that many Christians played in saving friends and neighbors from the hands of the Nazis.

To help these young people understand the concept of 6 million Holocaust victims, several student groups also saw “Paper Clips,” a movie that documented one school’s project to collect one paper clip for each Jewish life lost.

Hildenbrand’s colleague, Elizabeth Burgoon, helped her senior class to create scrapbooks that marked the lives of various fictional people who lived during the Holocaust through letters and pictures. To prepare for this competition entry, students read Night by Elie Weisel and The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, a book by Irish novelist John Boyne that was recently made into an award-winning movie.

Throughout the course of their school experience, the Catholic students will have much exposures to Holocaust studies, as well as ample opportunity for discussion. Said Hildenbrand: “We are trying to help them gain knowledge about a very dark period in history and learn from the past how to create a better world.”

The multimedia entries from Lansdale Catholic High School students and other competition participants were displayed from June 3 through June 15 at the Moore College of Art & Design.

Award winners were honored during a ceremony at the college on June 8.

The Mordechai Anielewicz Creative Arts Competition, now in its 36th year, provides students in grades seven to 12, of all religious and ethnic backgrounds, with a chance to respond to the Holocaust and its related issues through creative expression. Students are encouraged to submit original written, musical, art, film and creative dance works that focus on Holocaust themes.

The contest is sponsored by the Memorial Committee for the Six Million Jewish Martyrs of the Jewish Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia and the Auerbach Central Agency for Jewish Education, in cooperation with the Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, Sons and Daughters of Holocaust Survivors, Children of Jewish Holocaust Survivors Association of Philadelphia, Samuel Pelta Holocaust Education Endowment, Jewish Publication Society and Moore College of Art & Design. It is named in honor of Mordechai Anielewicz, the 19-year-old leader of the Jewish revolt against the Nazis in the Warsaw ghetto.

For more information, call Beth Razin at Federation: 215-832-0536 (e-mail: brazin@jfgp.org).

http://www.jewishexponent.com/article/19151/

Benedict Lauds St. Basil

July 7, 2007

Benedict continues his lectures on the Church Fathers:

VATICAN CITY, JULY 4, 2007 (Zenit.org).- Though St. Basil was a bishop in the fourth century, he continues to be a model for Christians today, Benedict XVI says … “He was a man who truly lived with his gaze fixed on Christ, a man of love for his neighbor. Full of the hope and the joy of faith, Basil shows us how to be real Christians.” (St. Basil a Model of Charity, Says Pope, Zenit, July 4, 2007)

http://www.zenit.org/article-20049?l=english

Let us hear some of St. Basil’s thoughts on Judaic Messianism, Zionism and Noachida. It’s a far cry from what we hear on these topics from the Vatican today:

Apollinarius … has written about the resurrection, from a mythical, or rather Jewish, point of view; urging that we shall return again to the worship of the Law, be circumcised, keep the Sabbath, abstain from meats, offer sacrifices to God, worship in the Temple at Jerusalem, and be altogether turned from Christians into Jews. What could be more ridiculous? Or, rather, what could be more contrary to the doctrines of the Gospel? (St. Basil, Letter 263;4)
http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/3202263.htm

Benedict Lauds St. Basil

July 7, 2007

Benedict continues his lectures on the Church Fathers:

VATICAN CITY, JULY 4, 2007 (Zenit.org).- Though St. Basil was a bishop in the fourth century, he continues to be a model for Christians today, Benedict XVI says … “He was a man who truly lived with his gaze fixed on Christ, a man of love for his neighbor. Full of the hope and the joy of faith, Basil shows us how to be real Christians.” (St. Basil a Model of Charity, Says Pope, Zenit, July 4, 2007)

http://www.zenit.org/article-20049?l=english

Let us hear some of St. Basil’s thoughts on Judaic Messianism, Zionism and Noachida. It’s a far cry from what we hear on these topics from the Vatican today:

Apollinarius … has written about the resurrection, from a mythical, or rather Jewish, point of view; urging that we shall return again to the worship of the Law, be circumcised, keep the Sabbath, abstain from meats, offer sacrifices to God, worship in the Temple at Jerusalem, and be altogether turned from Christians into Jews. What could be more ridiculous? Or, rather, what could be more contrary to the doctrines of the Gospel? (St. Basil, Letter 263;4)
http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/3202263.htm

International Council of Christians and Jews Expands It’s Reach to Australia

June 18, 2007

EDITOR’S NOTE: Edward Idris Cassidy, President Emeritus of Promoting Christian Unity, Roman Curia, will give the closing address at this event.

Rabbi Apple to headline inter-faith conference

NICOLE BRESKIN

THE Great Synagogue’s emeritus Rabbi Raymond Apple has been confirmed as the keynote speaker for the International Council of Christians and Jews’ (ICCJ’s) 2007 conference in Sydney later this month.

ICCJ president Dr John Pawlikowski visited Sydney last year and said that he chose the conference spot to extend the ground the organisation has covered.

“I look forward to a refreshing approach to the framework of the international conference, when we hold it in a region which is becoming more and more important,” he said.

Rabbi Apple is a founding member of the council and now resides in Israel.

He will travel to Sydney to present his address at the conference, which will be on “the leading of rifts between religions in a multicultural society”.

The four-day conference will also feature local speakers, Progressive leader Rabbi Dr John Levi, University of Sydney Associate Professor Suzanne Rutland and NSW Uniting Church moderator Jim Mein.

Prominent overseas academics and communal leaders participating include Kerem Institute in Jerusalem including director Dr Deborah Weissman, London’s Leo Baeck College Rabbi Jonathan Magonet and executive director of the Institute for Interreligious Intercultural Dialogue at Temple University in Philadelphia Dr Racelle Weiman.

The conference will be opened by NSW Governor Professor Marie Bashir on July 8 at the University of New South Wales’ Law School Theatre. It will close with a gala dinner and an address by Cardinal Edward Idriss Cassidy of the Vatican.

Rabbi Apple was a religious leader at the Great Synagogue for over 30 years and has served as judge of the Sydney Beth Din.

The ICCJ serves as the umbrella organisation of 38 Jewish-Christian dialogue organisations worldwide.

http://www.ajn.com.au/news/news.asp?pgID=3440

From the ICCJ mission statement:

The ICCJ member organisations world-wide over the past five decades have been successfully engaged in the historic renewal of Jewish-Christian relations. Founded as a reaction to the Holocaust, the Shoah, in the awareness that ways must be found to examine the deeply engrained roots of mistrust, hatred and fear that culminated in one of the worst evils in human history, theologians, historians and educators included the still fragile structure of enlightenment and the human rights movements of the inter-war period.

http://www.iccj.org/en/index.php

The most evil act in human history by a cosmic margin is the crucifixion of God incarnate at Calvary by the spiritual forebears of the rabbis of the ICCJ who presume to teach “the nations” how to prevent future “holocausts” even as their fellow rabbis provide scriptural exegetical rationalizations for indiscriminate killing of Palestinians.

Only a rabbi/pharisee would have the audacity to peddle a Kabbalistic tale of 6 million “Jews” killed in gas chambers as a replacement for the crucifixion of God incarnate as the most evil act in history and as the central ontological event of history. And only in an insane world would they get away with it.

What a farce.

International Council of Christians and Jews Expands It’s Reach to Australia

June 18, 2007

EDITOR’S NOTE: Edward Idris Cassidy, President Emeritus of Promoting Christian Unity, Roman Curia, will give the closing address at this event.

Rabbi Apple to headline inter-faith conference

NICOLE BRESKIN

THE Great Synagogue’s emeritus Rabbi Raymond Apple has been confirmed as the keynote speaker for the International Council of Christians and Jews’ (ICCJ’s) 2007 conference in Sydney later this month.

ICCJ president Dr John Pawlikowski visited Sydney last year and said that he chose the conference spot to extend the ground the organisation has covered.

“I look forward to a refreshing approach to the framework of the international conference, when we hold it in a region which is becoming more and more important,” he said.

Rabbi Apple is a founding member of the council and now resides in Israel.

He will travel to Sydney to present his address at the conference, which will be on “the leading of rifts between religions in a multicultural society”.

The four-day conference will also feature local speakers, Progressive leader Rabbi Dr John Levi, University of Sydney Associate Professor Suzanne Rutland and NSW Uniting Church moderator Jim Mein.

Prominent overseas academics and communal leaders participating include Kerem Institute in Jerusalem including director Dr Deborah Weissman, London’s Leo Baeck College Rabbi Jonathan Magonet and executive director of the Institute for Interreligious Intercultural Dialogue at Temple University in Philadelphia Dr Racelle Weiman.

The conference will be opened by NSW Governor Professor Marie Bashir on July 8 at the University of New South Wales’ Law School Theatre. It will close with a gala dinner and an address by Cardinal Edward Idriss Cassidy of the Vatican.

Rabbi Apple was a religious leader at the Great Synagogue for over 30 years and has served as judge of the Sydney Beth Din.

The ICCJ serves as the umbrella organisation of 38 Jewish-Christian dialogue organisations worldwide.

http://www.ajn.com.au/news/news.asp?pgID=3440

From the ICCJ mission statement:

The ICCJ member organisations world-wide over the past five decades have been successfully engaged in the historic renewal of Jewish-Christian relations. Founded as a reaction to the Holocaust, the Shoah, in the awareness that ways must be found to examine the deeply engrained roots of mistrust, hatred and fear that culminated in one of the worst evils in human history, theologians, historians and educators included the still fragile structure of enlightenment and the human rights movements of the inter-war period.

http://www.iccj.org/en/index.php

The most evil act in human history by a cosmic margin is the crucifixion of God incarnate at Calvary by the spiritual forebears of the rabbis of the ICCJ who presume to teach “the nations” how to prevent future “holocausts” even as their fellow rabbis provide scriptural exegetical rationalizations for indiscriminate killing of Palestinians.

Only a rabbi/pharisee would have the audacity to peddle a Kabbalistic tale of 6 million “Jews” killed in gas chambers as a replacement for the crucifixion of God incarnate as the most evil act in history and as the central ontological event of history. And only in an insane world would they get away with it.

What a farce.