Archive for the ‘Amy-Jill Levine’ Category

USCCB: Anti-Christ New Testament "an important milestone in Catholic-Jewish relations"

July 9, 2012
Catholic and rabbinic Pharisees met in New York on May 22, 2012 to further void the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Topics of ‘dialogue’ included Amy Jill Levine’s Gospel-nullifying New Testament which USCCB Bishop Denis Madden proclaimed to be, “an important milestone in Catholic-Jewish relations” evidently because it has been kosher-slaughtered to the degree that talmudist ‘Jews’ can read and appreciate it from their own perspective according to the executive director of the National Council of Synagogues, Rabbi Gil Rosenthal.

The progress of the implementation of practical aspects of the Vatican-Counterfeit Israel accord was discussed as was the bolshevik takeover of the SSPX.

The pharisaic vision for a “just economic order” begun by the Vatican-Chief Rabbinate of Counterfeit Israel bilateral commission which was warned against HERE, and HERE was discussed. Rabbi David Berger, the dean of Yeshiva University (where bishops and rabbis often study Talmud together) co-chaired that discussion.

“Religious freedom” was discussed; a ruse which will in all likelihood end with Catholics fighting to protect rabbinic depravity such as “suction by mouth” as the Christian mandate to speak the plain meaning of the Gospel is criminalized.

And a kosher youth catechism was discussed.

Catholic-Jewish Dialogues Explore Economics, Education, Religious Freedom And Jewish Take On New Testament

July 6, 2012

WASHINGTON—Gatherings of two different Catholic-Jewish dialogues explored topics including economics, education, religious freedom and even a Jewish commentary on the New Testament.

The semi-annual consultation of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops/National Council of Synagogues (USCCB/NCS) discussed the publication of Amy Jill Levine and Mark Zvi Brettler’s book, The Jewish Annotated New Testament (Oxford, 2012) at their May 22 meeting in New York City. Bishop Denis Madden, auxiliary of Baltimore, and Rabbi David Straus of the Main Line Reform Temple in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania co-chaired the meeting.

“The publication of Levine’s and Brettler’s comprehensive work on the New Testament represents an important milestone in Catholic-Jewish relations,” said Bishop Denis Madden, chairman of the USCCB Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs. “Never before has a group of Jewish scholars made so learned and technical a reading of the New Testament. Clearly, this new effort reflects the progress we have made since the Second Vatican Council in mutual respect for each other’s sacred Scriptures.”

Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York, president of USCCB, joined the meeting to extend his greetings and welcome to all the participants. He made brief remarks on the central importance of Catholic-Jewish dialogue and, in particular, of the work done between the USCCB and National Council of Synagogues. He thanked all of the members present for their continued dedication.

Professor Amy Jill Levine of Vanderbilt University gave a brief overview of her work, co-edited with Professor Marc Brettler of Brandeis University, while Jesuit Father John Donahue, professor of New Testament at Loyola University, Baltimore, offered a Catholic response. Dialogue members then discussed various aspects of biblical studies, as well as how the publication of The Jewish Annotated New Testament marked a deepening of understanding in Catholic-Jewish relations. Levine stressed that it is vital for Jews to study the New Testament to gain respect for their Christian neighbors, even as Christians must do the same with the Hebrew Scriptures.

Rabbi Gil Rosenthal, executive director of the National Council of Synagogues, remarked: “This important volume is testimony not only to the enormous competence of its editors and authors, but to the spirit of dialogue that can allow Jews to read and appreciate the Jewish context of Christian scriptures.”

Reports on other dialogue issues, such as continued progress in the implementation of practical aspects of the Vatican-Israeli accord, and updates on the reconciliation of the Society of St. Pius X with the Vatican filled the second half of the meeting. Plans for a two-day October dialogue were considered, centered around the topic of the role of religion in the public square.

On May 25, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops/Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America/Rabbinical Council of America (USCCB/OU/RCA) met for their semi-annual consultation to discuss global economics, religious education, religious freedom and the state of Israel. Bishop William Murphy of Rockville Centre, New York, and Rabbi David Berger, Ph.D., of Yeshiva University co-chaired the meeting.

The meeting began with a discussion of a religious perspective on financial reform and a vision for a just economic order. The group review of the full text of the Bilateral Commission Meeting of the Delegations for the Chief Rabbinate of Israel and the Holy See’s Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews, which took place March 27-29, at the Vatican. Both traditions underscored the need for the moral leadership of religious groups to shed light on ethical considerations in economic systems, their failures and possible reforms.

James Cultrara, director of education for the New York Catholic Conference, and Michael Cohen, New York State political director for the Orthodox Union, updated the group on the funding of religious schools in the state of New York, a topic of shared concerns for both communities. “There is a tuition crisis in both of our communities,” Cohen told the group. “The escalating cost of tuition, in some communities it has doubled within six or seven years. We need to find the solution that works.”

Thomas Renker, legal counsel for the Diocese of Rockville Centre, updated the group on developments in the federal HHS contraception mandate and the response of the Catholic community. The group discussed the situation at some length with several noting the inherent threat to religious freedom for all faith traditions which the situation presents.

Rabbi Tzvi H. Weinreb, executive vice president emeritus of the Orthodox Union, gave a brief presentation on current cultural and domestic policy issues in Israel. Bishop Murphy gave a brief report on the new Catholic Catechism for Youth titled “YouCAT.” Of specific interest to the group were sections dealing with Jewish people. Some concerns had previously been voiced surrounding the formulation of some parts of the text, initiating a revision.

Additional Jewish participants in the USCCB/OU/ RCA consultation included: Maury Litwack, director of political affairs, OU; Betty Ehrenberg, executive director of the World Jewish Congress North America; Nathan Diament, director of public affairs, OU; Rabbi Basil Herring, executive vice president, RCA; Rabbi Aaron Glatt, Young Israel of Woodmere; and Mr. Avi Schick, an attorney with experience in both government work and interfaith relations.Additional Catholic included: Msgr. Donald Beckman, ecumenical officer of the Diocese of Rockville Centre; Father Robert Robbins, pastor of the United Nations Parish Church of the Holy Family and New York archdiocesan director for ecumenical and interreligious affairs; Msgr. Robert Stern, Catholic Near East Welfare Association; Father John Crossin, executive director, USCCB Secretariat for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs (SEIA); Kirsten Evans, program and research specialist, USCCB SEIA.

Jewish participants at the USCCB/NCS consultation included Rabbi Lewis Eron, Cherry Hill, New Jersey; Rabbi Joel Meyers, executive vice-president emeritus of the (Conservative) Rabbinical Assembly; Rabbi Jonathan Waxman, Temple Beth Sholom, Smitonthtown, New York; Rabbi David Straus, Central Conference of American Rabbis; Rabbi Gilbert Rosenthal, National Council of Synagogues; Rabbi Daniel F. Polish of La Grangeville, New York; Ruth Langer, Ph.D., of Boston College; Rabbi David Sandmel, Ph.D. of The Catholic Theological Union, Chicago; Rabbi Alvin Berkin of The Tree of Life Congregation, Pittsburgh; Rabbi Jeffrey A. Wohlberg of Adas Israel, Washington; Rabbi Jerome Davidson of Temple Beth-El, Great Neck, New York; Judith Hertz of the International Council of Presidents of the World Conferences of Religions for Peace and Betty Ehrenberg, executive director of the North American Division of the World Jewish Congress. Catholic participants at the consultation included Bishop Basil H. Losten, former bishop of Stamford for Ukrainians; Brother of the Christians Schools David Carroll, former associate director at Catholic Near East Welfare Association; Msgr. Robert Stern, former director of the Catholic Near East Welfare Association; Father Dennis McManus, USCCB consultant for Jewish Affairs and Jesuit Father Drew Christiansen, editor of America Magazine.

http://www.usccb.org/news/2012/12-125.cfm

Anti-Christ ‘New Testament’ Published

November 26, 2011
This would rightly be viewed as a continuation of the millenia-long Orthodox Judaic tradition of mocking the Gospel; a “Toledoth Jeshu” in scholarly guise. The Gospel-mocking “Toledoth Jeshu” has never been retracted or apologized for. It is still published by the Pope and bishops’ brothers in the anti-Christ faith.

Orthodox adherent of Rabbinic Judaism, Amy-Jill Levine

Dr. Levine … attends an Orthodox synagogue in Nashville …

“Yimach sh’mo v’zikhrono (May [Jesus’] name and memory be blotted out)”

The book [Orthodox Judaic subverter of Christianity in the disguise of a scholar of Christianity, Amy-Jill Levine] has just edited with a Brandeis University professor, Marc Zvi Brettler, “The Jewish Annotated New Testament” (Oxford University Press), is an unusual [allegedly] scholarly experiment: an edition of the Christian [New Testament] edited entirely by Jews. The volume includes notes and explanatory essays by 50 leading [scholars of rabbinic Judaism], including Susannah Heschel, a historian and the daughter of the [Rabbi] Abraham Joshua Heschel [who wanted to attack Christian souls]; the Talmudist Daniel Boyarin; and Shaye J. D. Cohen, who teaches ancient Judaism at Harvard…

Dr. Levine … attends an Orthodox synagogue in Nashville … (Mark Oppenheimer, “Focusing on the Jewish Story of the New Testament,” The New York Times, November 25, 2011)

Full article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/26/us/a-jewish-edition-of-the-new-testament-beliefs.html

Time Magazine: Re-Judaizing Jesus

March 20, 2008

The season of “Catholic” seders and various other mocking abominations unto God is upon us. The following article from Time magazine is an example of such.

Jesus was born to the tribe of Judah. He was not a Khazar and He did not subscribe to Rabbinism/Pharisaism which is exactly the idea that this article is intended to promote. It is intended to make us think that Jesus and St. Paul had a lot in common with the so-called “Jews” of our time who understand Jesus better than Christians ever did: Christians have not understood Jesus for 2000 years and we need the rabbis and their texts rotten with absurd fables, racial supremacism and self-worship in order to finally understand Him correctly. Pure delusion.


Re-Judaizing Jesus

DAVID VAN BIEMA – Time

Recently a popular blogger — let’s call him Rabbi Ben — zinged the scholarship of a man we shall call Rabbi Rob. R. Ben claimed R. Rob did not “understand the difference between Judaism prior to the two Jewish wars in the 1st and 2nd centuries A.D. and later Mishnaic and Talmudic Judaism.” He helpfully provided a syllabus.

Actually, neither man is a rabbi. (Sorry.) Ben Witherington is a Methodist New Testament scholar, and Rob Bell a rising Michigan megapastor. Yet each regards sources like the Mishnah and Rabbi Akiva as vital to understanding history’s best-known Jew: Jesus.

This is seismic. For centuries, the discipline of Christian “Hebraics” consisted primarily of Christians cherry-picking Jewish texts to support the traditionally assumed contradiction between the Jews — whose alleged dry legalism contributed to their fumbling their ancient tribal covenant with God — and Jesus, who personally embodied God’s new covenant of love. But today seminaries across the Christian spectrum teach, as Vanderbilt University New Testament scholar Amy-Jill Levine says, that “if you get the [Jewish] context wrong, you will certainly get Jesus wrong.”

The shift came in stages: first a brute acceptance that Jesus was born a Jew and did Jewish things; then admission that he and his interpreter Paul saw themselves as Jews even while founding what became another faith; and today, recognition of what the Rev. Bruce Chilton, author of Rabbi Jesus, calls Jesus’ passionate dedication “to Jewish ideas of his day” on everything from ritual purity to the ideal of the kingdom of God — ideas he rewove but did not abandon.

What does this mean, practically? At times the resulting adjustment seems simple. For example, Bell thinks he knows the mysterious words Jesus wrote in the dust while defending the adulteress (“He that is without sin among you, let him cast the first stone,” etc.). By Bell’s calculation, that showdown occurred at the same time as religious Jews’ yearly reading of the prophet Jeremiah’s warning that “those who turn from [God] will be written in the dust because they have forsaken [him].” Thus Jesus wrote the crowd’s names to warn that their lack of compassion alienated their (and his) God.

A trickier revision for readers involves Paul’s Letter to the Romans, forever a key Christian text on sin and Christ’s salvific grace. Yet this reading necessitates skipping over what seems like extraneous material in Chapters 9 through 11, which are about the Jews. Increasingly, says Jason Byassee, an editor at the Christian Century,, scholars now read Romans through those chapters, as a musing by a lifelong Jew on how God can fulfill his biblical covenant with Israel even if it does not accept His son. Byassee the theologian agrees. But as a Methodist pastor, he frets that Romans “is no longer really about Gentile Christians. How do you preach it?”

That’s not a frivolous query. Ideally, the reassessment should increase both Jewish-Christian amity and gospel clarity, things that won’t happen if regular Christians feel that in rediscovering Jesus the Jew, they have lost Christ. Yet Bell finds this particular genie so logically powerful that he has no wish to rebottle it. Once in, he says, “you’re in deep. You’re hooked. ‘Cause you can’t ever read it the same way again.”

http://www.time.com/time/specials/2007/article/0,28804,1720049_1720050_1721663,00.html

Time Magazine: Re-Judaizing Jesus

March 20, 2008

The season of “Catholic” seders and various other mocking abominations unto God is upon us. The following article from Time magazine is an example of such.

Jesus was born to the tribe of Judah. He was not a Khazar and He did not subscribe to Rabbinism/Pharisaism which is exactly the idea that this article is intended to promote. It is intended to make us think that Jesus and St. Paul had a lot in common with the so-called “Jews” of our time who understand Jesus better than Christians ever did: Christians have not understood Jesus for 2000 years and we need the rabbis and their texts rotten with absurd fables, racial supremacism and self-worship in order to finally understand Him correctly. Pure delusion.


Re-Judaizing Jesus

DAVID VAN BIEMA – Time

Recently a popular blogger — let’s call him Rabbi Ben — zinged the scholarship of a man we shall call Rabbi Rob. R. Ben claimed R. Rob did not “understand the difference between Judaism prior to the two Jewish wars in the 1st and 2nd centuries A.D. and later Mishnaic and Talmudic Judaism.” He helpfully provided a syllabus.

Actually, neither man is a rabbi. (Sorry.) Ben Witherington is a Methodist New Testament scholar, and Rob Bell a rising Michigan megapastor. Yet each regards sources like the Mishnah and Rabbi Akiva as vital to understanding history’s best-known Jew: Jesus.

This is seismic. For centuries, the discipline of Christian “Hebraics” consisted primarily of Christians cherry-picking Jewish texts to support the traditionally assumed contradiction between the Jews — whose alleged dry legalism contributed to their fumbling their ancient tribal covenant with God — and Jesus, who personally embodied God’s new covenant of love. But today seminaries across the Christian spectrum teach, as Vanderbilt University New Testament scholar Amy-Jill Levine says, that “if you get the [Jewish] context wrong, you will certainly get Jesus wrong.”

The shift came in stages: first a brute acceptance that Jesus was born a Jew and did Jewish things; then admission that he and his interpreter Paul saw themselves as Jews even while founding what became another faith; and today, recognition of what the Rev. Bruce Chilton, author of Rabbi Jesus, calls Jesus’ passionate dedication “to Jewish ideas of his day” on everything from ritual purity to the ideal of the kingdom of God — ideas he rewove but did not abandon.

What does this mean, practically? At times the resulting adjustment seems simple. For example, Bell thinks he knows the mysterious words Jesus wrote in the dust while defending the adulteress (“He that is without sin among you, let him cast the first stone,” etc.). By Bell’s calculation, that showdown occurred at the same time as religious Jews’ yearly reading of the prophet Jeremiah’s warning that “those who turn from [God] will be written in the dust because they have forsaken [him].” Thus Jesus wrote the crowd’s names to warn that their lack of compassion alienated their (and his) God.

A trickier revision for readers involves Paul’s Letter to the Romans, forever a key Christian text on sin and Christ’s salvific grace. Yet this reading necessitates skipping over what seems like extraneous material in Chapters 9 through 11, which are about the Jews. Increasingly, says Jason Byassee, an editor at the Christian Century,, scholars now read Romans through those chapters, as a musing by a lifelong Jew on how God can fulfill his biblical covenant with Israel even if it does not accept His son. Byassee the theologian agrees. But as a Methodist pastor, he frets that Romans “is no longer really about Gentile Christians. How do you preach it?”

That’s not a frivolous query. Ideally, the reassessment should increase both Jewish-Christian amity and gospel clarity, things that won’t happen if regular Christians feel that in rediscovering Jesus the Jew, they have lost Christ. Yet Bell finds this particular genie so logically powerful that he has no wish to rebottle it. Once in, he says, “you’re in deep. You’re hooked. ‘Cause you can’t ever read it the same way again.”

http://www.time.com/time/specials/2007/article/0,28804,1720049_1720050_1721663,00.html