Archive for the ‘Abomination’ Category

The Crucifixion Narrative for Goys vs. the Crucifixion Narrative Which the Rabbis Maintain Amongst Themselves

March 20, 2008

In the depictions of the Crucifixion of Jesus Christ intended for Goys, the Romans and Pilate are made to be responsible, but among themselves Orthodox “Jews” fully take responsibility for the Crucifixion, even exonerating the Romans completely.

Compare the BBC mockery of the Gospel titled “The Passion” with the Talmudic account of the Crucifixion:

The Crucifixion story for Goys:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/showbiz/showbiznews.html?in_article_id=535748&in_page_id=1773

The Crucifixion account which the rabbis maintain amongst themselves:

http://www.revisionisthistory.org/wire1.html

Far from being an esoteric teaching of rabbinic Judaism, the willing acceptance for responsibility for the Crucifixion of Jesus is openly manifested in times and places where Orthodox Judaic persons have dominance. It is not uncommon to hear differing variations of the insulting threat, “Take your Jesus down from the cross and we’ll crucify him again,” or, “If Jesus comes back we’ll kill him again,” or, “We killed Jesus and we’ll kill you too.”

Evidence of this hateful tradition can be seen at the links below:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/we-killed-jesus-and-well-kill-you-too.html

Also see:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/effects-of-alcohol-and-judaism.html

A fine basis for “reconciliation,” no?

The Crucifixion Narrative for Goys vs. the Crucifixion Narrative Which the Rabbis Maintain Amongst Themselves

March 20, 2008

In the depictions of the Crucifixion of Jesus Christ intended for Goys, the Romans and Pilate are made to be responsible, but among themselves Orthodox “Jews” fully take responsibility for the Crucifixion, even exonerating the Romans completely.

Compare the BBC mockery of the Gospel titled “The Passion” with the Talmudic account of the Crucifixion:

The Crucifixion story for Goys:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/showbiz/showbiznews.html?in_article_id=535748&in_page_id=1773

The Crucifixion account which the rabbis maintain amongst themselves:

http://www.revisionisthistory.org/wire1.html

Far from being an esoteric teaching of rabbinic Judaism, the willing acceptance for responsibility for the Crucifixion of Jesus is openly manifested in times and places where Orthodox Judaic persons have dominance. It is not uncommon to hear differing variations of the insulting threat, “Take your Jesus down from the cross and we’ll crucify him again,” or, “If Jesus comes back we’ll kill him again,” or, “We killed Jesus and we’ll kill you too.”

Evidence of this hateful tradition can be seen at the links below:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/we-killed-jesus-and-well-kill-you-too.html

Also see:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/02/effects-of-alcohol-and-judaism.html

A fine basis for “reconciliation,” no?

St. Kilians Noahide Cathedral

February 21, 2008
This is an abomination

A huge menorah at the entrance to St Kilians Cathedral, Würzburg , Germany

St. Kilians Noahide Cathedral

February 21, 2008
This is an abomination

A huge menorah at the entrance to St Kilians Cathedral, Würzburg , Germany

St. Kilians Noahide Cathedral

February 21, 2008
This is an abomination

A huge menorah at the entrance to St Kilians Cathedral, Würzburg , Germany

How Wisconsin Bishop Listecki and His Flock Observe Advent

December 5, 2007

What better way to prepare oneself worthily to celebrate the anniversary of the Lord’s coming into the world as the incarnate God than to join those whose tradition viciously mocks the incarnate God:

Bishop Jerome Listecki, right, lights a Menorah along with Rabbi Saul Prombaum, left center, and David and Betty Hammes at the Congregation Sons of Abraham of the first night of Hanukkah. Erik Daily


Local Catholics, Jews unite at opening Hanukkah service

By JOE ORSO | La Crosse Tribune
Wednesday, December 05, 2007

Two days after Catholics began their Advent season, the local Jewish congregation began Hanukkah with an interfaith first for the Coulee Region.

Bishop Jerome Listecki, head of the Diocese of La Crosse, addressed about 50 people at Congregation Sons of Abraham, making him the first Catholic bishop to speak at the synagogue.

“I am here with you this evening as a friend,” Listecki said, wearing a violet zuchetto that resembled the yarmulkes worn on the heads of Rabbi Saul Prombaum and others gathered. “In that friendship, I share in the confidence that together we might walk in a rededication to our freedom and mutual respect directed by the light that guides our path.”

The event wasn’t the beginning of the relationship between local Jews and Catholics.

In 1998, members of the synagogue, a Catholic parish and United Church of Christ congregation traveled together to Israel …

The joint celebration was coordinated by Monsignor Bernard McGarty, a visiting scholar of ecumenical studies at Viterbo University, who also attended.

Prombaum, head of the Jewish congregation, led the people in Hebrew, English and silent prayers during the first part of the service.

“Praised are you, Adonai our God, who rules the universe, your word bringing the evening dusk,” the congregation said as Listecki, sitting in the fourth pew, prayed along. “You create day and night, rolling light away from darkness and darkness away from light.”

At the climax of the event, as snow continued to fall outside, Prombaum invited Listecki to light the center candles of four Hanukkah menorahs.

Then Listecki, Prombaum and David and Betty Hammes, a Catholic couple who in January will have been neighbors of the synagogue for 50 years, used the central candles to light the first of the eight Hanukkah candles on the four menorahs.

Prombaum also recognized the Hammeses with a brass leaf on the synagogue’s Tree of Life, and said they live by Leviticus 19:18, which includes the command to love your neighbor as yourself.

“We love you as our neighbors,” Prombaum said to them.

After Listecki’s address, he took questions, including one on the Catholic church’s position on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Listecki said the Vatican has tried to maintain itself as an arbiter and a broker of peace.

During his remarks to the congregation, Listecki said the Jewish-Catholic dialogue began in his life with a Jewish friend of his family, who read the Mourner’s Kaddish, a Jewish prayer, at his father’s wake.

And he referred to a Vatican II document he called a blueprint for inter-religious dialogue for the church in the world.

“Words on paper take time to develop and cut through the generations of inaccuracies and errors,” he said, referring to the document, Nostra Aetate. “But friendships are created in the shared experiences of life amid the struggles of our times.”

http://www.lacrossetribune.com/articles/2007/12/05/news/00lead.txt

How Wisconsin Bishop Listecki and His Flock Observe Advent

December 5, 2007

What better way to prepare oneself worthily to celebrate the anniversary of the Lord’s coming into the world as the incarnate God than to join those whose tradition viciously mocks the incarnate God:

Bishop Jerome Listecki, right, lights a Menorah along with Rabbi Saul Prombaum, left center, and David and Betty Hammes at the Congregation Sons of Abraham of the first night of Hanukkah. Erik Daily


Local Catholics, Jews unite at opening Hanukkah service

By JOE ORSO | La Crosse Tribune
Wednesday, December 05, 2007

Two days after Catholics began their Advent season, the local Jewish congregation began Hanukkah with an interfaith first for the Coulee Region.

Bishop Jerome Listecki, head of the Diocese of La Crosse, addressed about 50 people at Congregation Sons of Abraham, making him the first Catholic bishop to speak at the synagogue.

“I am here with you this evening as a friend,” Listecki said, wearing a violet zuchetto that resembled the yarmulkes worn on the heads of Rabbi Saul Prombaum and others gathered. “In that friendship, I share in the confidence that together we might walk in a rededication to our freedom and mutual respect directed by the light that guides our path.”

The event wasn’t the beginning of the relationship between local Jews and Catholics.

In 1998, members of the synagogue, a Catholic parish and United Church of Christ congregation traveled together to Israel …

The joint celebration was coordinated by Monsignor Bernard McGarty, a visiting scholar of ecumenical studies at Viterbo University, who also attended.

Prombaum, head of the Jewish congregation, led the people in Hebrew, English and silent prayers during the first part of the service.

“Praised are you, Adonai our God, who rules the universe, your word bringing the evening dusk,” the congregation said as Listecki, sitting in the fourth pew, prayed along. “You create day and night, rolling light away from darkness and darkness away from light.”

At the climax of the event, as snow continued to fall outside, Prombaum invited Listecki to light the center candles of four Hanukkah menorahs.

Then Listecki, Prombaum and David and Betty Hammes, a Catholic couple who in January will have been neighbors of the synagogue for 50 years, used the central candles to light the first of the eight Hanukkah candles on the four menorahs.

Prombaum also recognized the Hammeses with a brass leaf on the synagogue’s Tree of Life, and said they live by Leviticus 19:18, which includes the command to love your neighbor as yourself.

“We love you as our neighbors,” Prombaum said to them.

After Listecki’s address, he took questions, including one on the Catholic church’s position on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Listecki said the Vatican has tried to maintain itself as an arbiter and a broker of peace.

During his remarks to the congregation, Listecki said the Jewish-Catholic dialogue began in his life with a Jewish friend of his family, who read the Mourner’s Kaddish, a Jewish prayer, at his father’s wake.

And he referred to a Vatican II document he called a blueprint for inter-religious dialogue for the church in the world.

“Words on paper take time to develop and cut through the generations of inaccuracies and errors,” he said, referring to the document, Nostra Aetate. “But friendships are created in the shared experiences of life amid the struggles of our times.”

http://www.lacrossetribune.com/articles/2007/12/05/news/00lead.txt

How Wisconsin Bishop Listecki and His Flock Observe Advent

December 5, 2007

What better way to prepare oneself worthily to celebrate the anniversary of the Lord’s coming into the world as the incarnate God than to join those whose tradition viciously mocks the incarnate God:

Bishop Jerome Listecki, right, lights a Menorah along with Rabbi Saul Prombaum, left center, and David and Betty Hammes at the Congregation Sons of Abraham of the first night of Hanukkah. Erik Daily


Local Catholics, Jews unite at opening Hanukkah service

By JOE ORSO | La Crosse Tribune
Wednesday, December 05, 2007

Two days after Catholics began their Advent season, the local Jewish congregation began Hanukkah with an interfaith first for the Coulee Region.

Bishop Jerome Listecki, head of the Diocese of La Crosse, addressed about 50 people at Congregation Sons of Abraham, making him the first Catholic bishop to speak at the synagogue.

“I am here with you this evening as a friend,” Listecki said, wearing a violet zuchetto that resembled the yarmulkes worn on the heads of Rabbi Saul Prombaum and others gathered. “In that friendship, I share in the confidence that together we might walk in a rededication to our freedom and mutual respect directed by the light that guides our path.”

The event wasn’t the beginning of the relationship between local Jews and Catholics.

In 1998, members of the synagogue, a Catholic parish and United Church of Christ congregation traveled together to Israel …

The joint celebration was coordinated by Monsignor Bernard McGarty, a visiting scholar of ecumenical studies at Viterbo University, who also attended.

Prombaum, head of the Jewish congregation, led the people in Hebrew, English and silent prayers during the first part of the service.

“Praised are you, Adonai our God, who rules the universe, your word bringing the evening dusk,” the congregation said as Listecki, sitting in the fourth pew, prayed along. “You create day and night, rolling light away from darkness and darkness away from light.”

At the climax of the event, as snow continued to fall outside, Prombaum invited Listecki to light the center candles of four Hanukkah menorahs.

Then Listecki, Prombaum and David and Betty Hammes, a Catholic couple who in January will have been neighbors of the synagogue for 50 years, used the central candles to light the first of the eight Hanukkah candles on the four menorahs.

Prombaum also recognized the Hammeses with a brass leaf on the synagogue’s Tree of Life, and said they live by Leviticus 19:18, which includes the command to love your neighbor as yourself.

“We love you as our neighbors,” Prombaum said to them.

After Listecki’s address, he took questions, including one on the Catholic church’s position on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Listecki said the Vatican has tried to maintain itself as an arbiter and a broker of peace.

During his remarks to the congregation, Listecki said the Jewish-Catholic dialogue began in his life with a Jewish friend of his family, who read the Mourner’s Kaddish, a Jewish prayer, at his father’s wake.

And he referred to a Vatican II document he called a blueprint for inter-religious dialogue for the church in the world.

“Words on paper take time to develop and cut through the generations of inaccuracies and errors,” he said, referring to the document, Nostra Aetate. “But friendships are created in the shared experiences of life amid the struggles of our times.”

http://www.lacrossetribune.com/articles/2007/12/05/news/00lead.txt

Lustiger’s Alchemical Funeral Update

August 12, 2007

Lustiger’s grand-nephew, Jonas Moses Lustiger, read a psalm in Hebrew and French, and placed a bowl of earth gathered from Jewish and Christian sites in the Holy Land.

A Jewish Cardinal? Oy Vey!

Joan Z. Shore

Yesterday, I attended the funeral service held for Cardinal Jean-Marie Lustiger at Notre-Dame in Paris.

It was unlike any funeral I’ve ever attended, and surely unlike any service ever held at this cathedral in its 700 years of existence. I suppose it came as close to ecumenism as one can expect in a Catholic country …

… the extraordinary break from tradition was the presence of several dozen prominent members of France’s Jewish community, seated outside the cathedral to hear the Kaddish — the Jewish prayer for the dead — that was intoned before the service began. Lustiger’s cousin and young grand-nephew from Israel brought soil from two holy sites to be placed in the coffin — a specific wish of the Cardinal’s.

Inside the cathedral a special area was reserved in the front rows for “the Jewish Community.” France’s leading Reform rabbi, Daniel Fahri, was there with his wife, but no Conservative or Orthodox rabbi attended. “They wouldn’t step foot in here,” a friend confided to me …

Thanks in large part to Lustiger’s insistence, the Carmelite convent that was rather indecently built at Auschwitz in 1984 was removed.

“I was born Jewish, and so I remain,” Lustiger once proclaimed in an interview, “even if that is unacceptable to many.” While Catholics seem to accept this with a certain ironic pride, Jews are divided. A former chief rabbi of Paris once remarked that “a Jew becoming a Christian….is turning his back on it” …

He was known to chat in Yiddish to close Jewish friends.

And once, after hearing him speak at a press luncheon, I went up to thank him and boldly said, You know, you would have made a good rabbi, too!

And he laughed. (“A Jewish Cardinal? Oy Vey!”, Joan Z. Shore, August 11, 2007)

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joan-z-shore/a-jewish-cardinal-oy-vey_b_60066.html

Lustiger’s Alchemical Funeral Update

August 12, 2007

Lustiger’s grand-nephew, Jonas Moses Lustiger, read a psalm in Hebrew and French, and placed a bowl of earth gathered from Jewish and Christian sites in the Holy Land.

A Jewish Cardinal? Oy Vey!

Joan Z. Shore

Yesterday, I attended the funeral service held for Cardinal Jean-Marie Lustiger at Notre-Dame in Paris.

It was unlike any funeral I’ve ever attended, and surely unlike any service ever held at this cathedral in its 700 years of existence. I suppose it came as close to ecumenism as one can expect in a Catholic country …

… the extraordinary break from tradition was the presence of several dozen prominent members of France’s Jewish community, seated outside the cathedral to hear the Kaddish — the Jewish prayer for the dead — that was intoned before the service began. Lustiger’s cousin and young grand-nephew from Israel brought soil from two holy sites to be placed in the coffin — a specific wish of the Cardinal’s.

Inside the cathedral a special area was reserved in the front rows for “the Jewish Community.” France’s leading Reform rabbi, Daniel Fahri, was there with his wife, but no Conservative or Orthodox rabbi attended. “They wouldn’t step foot in here,” a friend confided to me …

Thanks in large part to Lustiger’s insistence, the Carmelite convent that was rather indecently built at Auschwitz in 1984 was removed.

“I was born Jewish, and so I remain,” Lustiger once proclaimed in an interview, “even if that is unacceptable to many.” While Catholics seem to accept this with a certain ironic pride, Jews are divided. A former chief rabbi of Paris once remarked that “a Jew becoming a Christian….is turning his back on it” …

He was known to chat in Yiddish to close Jewish friends.

And once, after hearing him speak at a press luncheon, I went up to thank him and boldly said, You know, you would have made a good rabbi, too!

And he laughed. (“A Jewish Cardinal? Oy Vey!”, Joan Z. Shore, August 11, 2007)

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joan-z-shore/a-jewish-cardinal-oy-vey_b_60066.html