Archive for April, 2009

"Auschwitz: Beginning of a New Era?"

April 28, 2009

I have been reading a book titled, Auschwitz: Beginning of a New Era? This is a collection of papers given at an “International Symposium on the Holocaust” held at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City, June 3 to 6, 1974. The book is edited by Eva Fleischer and published by the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine and the “Anti-Defamation League” of “B’nai B’rith.”

The title of the book should be Theological Contrivances Rationalizing Displacement of Calvary by Auschwitz to be Taught in Christian Churches and Schools because that is precisely what Catholic priests, Protestant ministers, rabbis and others including Elie Wiesel came together to synthesize at this symposium.

Gregory Baum was a Judaic (alleged) convert to Catholicism and Catholic priest, assistant to Cardinal Bea and peritus (theological advisor) at the Second Vatican Council, particularly on the three most troubling Vatican II documents, Dignitatis Humanæ, Unitatis Redintegratio and Nostra Aetate. For the moment I will focus primarily on his words because he was a priest of great influence in Rome and at the Vatican II Council.

Getting straight to business, Fr. Gregory Baum opened his talk thus:

After Auschwitz the Christian churches no longer wish to convert the Jews. While they may not be sure of the theological grounds that dispense them from this mission, the churches have become aware that asking the Jews to become Christians is a spiritual way of blotting them out of existence and thus only reinforces the effects of the Holocaust. The churches, moreover, realize the deadly irony implicit in a Christian plea for the conversion of the Jews; for after Auschwitz and the participation of the nations, it is the Christian world that is in need of conversion. The major churches have come to repudiate mission to the Jews, even if they have not justified this by adequate doctrinal explanations. We have here a case, frequently found in church history, where a practical decision on the part of the churches, in response to a significant event, precedes dogmatic reflection and in fact becomes the guide to future doctrinal development. Moved by a sense of shame over the doctrinal formulations that negate Jewish existence, the churches have come to recognize Judaism as an authentic religion before God, with independent value and meaning, not as a stage on the way to Christianity …

The new openness to Jewish faith and the emergence of a new understanding of mission reflect the response of the Christian conscience to the voice of the Holocaust … The churches believe that they have been addressed by God’s Word through these events: they have placed themselves under God’s judgment.

Fr. Baum later returns to this idea that “God’s Word” is spoken to the “Christian conscience” through “The Holocaust” and explains what is “demanded” in response to “God’s call.”

Even without elaborating an adequate dogmatic basis, they have made significant public declarations and changed the public policy in remarkable ways. Christian theologians have reflected on the new trends and tried to establish their doctrinal foundation. Christian educators have begun to rewrite catechisms and schoolbooks. Many missionary congregations and Christian-action groups have abandoned their former ideal of evangelization and adopted a new policy, according to which missionaries enter into solidarity with the people in whose midst they serve, bear the burdens of life with them, and promote the self-discovery and humanization taking place in their midst. In particular the churches have renounced the desire to convert the Jews; they have begun to call them brothers and sisters.

While these changes have taken place on the highest ecclesiastical level, in official circles and among Christians intensely involved in the problems of contemporary life, the effect of the new policy on the great majority of Christians is negligible. Most Christians have not even begun to reflect on these issues … the reason why the new policies adopted by the churches have so little power and influence among Christians is that the negation of Judaism and other religions seems to be built into the central Christian symbols. The corrections made on the margins hardly affect the central teaching. Since Christian teaching confesses Jesus as the one mediator between God and man, and the church as the true Israel, the unique vehicle of salvation, in whom the peoples of the world will find forgiveness and new life, the dangerous social trends against which the new ecclesiastical policies have reacted continue to affect the Christian understanding of history. Unless people are well informed and belong to a religious elite, the traditional language continues to shape their outlook and attitude. What is demanded, therefore, is that the churches interpret the central Christian doctrine, in obedience to God’s call, in a more socially responsible way and find a sound dogmatic basis for their new policies … (Auschwitz, Beginning of a New Era?, pp. 113, 116-117)

As we can see, Vatican II peritus Fr. Gregory Baum was not a convert to Catholicism, but rather, a subvert who sought to convert Catholics to a new religion as he stated explicitly himself: “… after Auschwitz … it is the Christian world that is in need of conversion.”

“After Auschwitz” is of course Baum’s designator for the measurement of time in the new dispensation he is operating in. As Calvary is replaced by Auschwitz in this new religion, so, Anno Domini is replaced by Anno Auschwitz. If you believe that I’m reading into his words, then listen to co-speaker Johannes Hoekendijk in his response to Baum’s paper:

“Are we anno Auschwitz 30 in a new era? That is what the theme of our colloquium suggests … After Auschwitz: The State of Israel–A New era.” (ibid p.129)

Note that Gregory Baum lamented in 1974 that while he and his comrades in Rome were inebriated on the new “Holocaust” religion that the laity in the pews hadn’t yet received the message. I imagine that he must be quite pleased with the “Holocaust” religion teaching opportunity which materialized in January-February 2009 HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE.

Fr. Baum speaks at length on the topic of the revised Vatican II “mission” of the Church which negates Catholic traditional missionary theology and activity which he was involved in formulating. Just as the central dogmas of Catholicism are subordinate to “Holocaust” theology as quoted above, so is Christian missionary activity, in Gregory Baum’s universe:

“The new openness to the Jewish faith and the emergence of a new understanding of mission reflect the response of the Christian conscience to the voice of the Holocaust …

Fr. Baum repeats his delusional language suggesting that God, speaking in judgment through “The Holocaust,” is commanding this change in mission:

“The churches believe that they have been addressed by God’s Word through these events: they have placed themselves under God’s judgment.” (ibid p.116)

Gregory Baum proposed a replacement theology in which the “existence” of “The Jews” is the first principle to which even the most fundamental Catholic dogmas must yield. I reiterate that it is a Vatican II peritus who wrote these things 35 years ago. Clearly we can see in recent events that many prelates in and outside the Vatican have made these lunatic ideas their own.

See:

The New Catholic “Shoah” Theology: Newsletter #47

"Auschwitz: Beginning of a New Era?"

April 28, 2009

I have been reading a book titled, Auschwitz: Beginning of a New Era? This is a collection of papers given at an “International Symposium on the Holocaust” held at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City, June 3 to 6, 1974. The book is edited by Eva Fleischer and published by the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine and the “Anti-Defamation League” of “B’nai B’rith.”

The title of the book should be Theological Contrivances Rationalizing Displacement of Calvary by Auschwitz to be Taught in Christian Churches and Schools because that is precisely what Catholic priests, Protestant ministers, rabbis and others including Elie Wiesel came together to synthesize at this symposium.

Gregory Baum was a Judaic (alleged) convert to Catholicism and Catholic priest, assistant to Cardinal Bea and peritus (theological advisor) at the Second Vatican Council, particularly on the three most troubling Vatican II documents, Dignitatis Humanæ, Unitatis Redintegratio and Nostra Aetate. For the moment I will focus primarily on his words because he was a priest of great influence in Rome and at the Vatican II Council.

Getting straight to business, Fr. Gregory Baum opened his talk thus:

After Auschwitz the Christian churches no longer wish to convert the Jews. While they may not be sure of the theological grounds that dispense them from this mission, the churches have become aware that asking the Jews to become Christians is a spiritual way of blotting them out of existence and thus only reinforces the effects of the Holocaust. The churches, moreover, realize the deadly irony implicit in a Christian plea for the conversion of the Jews; for after Auschwitz and the participation of the nations, it is the Christian world that is in need of conversion. The major churches have come to repudiate mission to the Jews, even if they have not justified this by adequate doctrinal explanations. We have here a case, frequently found in church history, where a practical decision on the part of the churches, in response to a significant event, precedes dogmatic reflection and in fact becomes the guide to future doctrinal development. Moved by a sense of shame over the doctrinal formulations that negate Jewish existence, the churches have come to recognize Judaism as an authentic religion before God, with independent value and meaning, not as a stage on the way to Christianity …

The new openness to Jewish faith and the emergence of a new understanding of mission reflect the response of the Christian conscience to the voice of the Holocaust … The churches believe that they have been addressed by God’s Word through these events: they have placed themselves under God’s judgment.

Fr. Baum later returns to this idea that “God’s Word” is spoken to the “Christian conscience” through “The Holocaust” and explains what is “demanded” in response to “God’s call.”

Even without elaborating an adequate dogmatic basis, they have made significant public declarations and changed the public policy in remarkable ways. Christian theologians have reflected on the new trends and tried to establish their doctrinal foundation. Christian educators have begun to rewrite catechisms and schoolbooks. Many missionary congregations and Christian-action groups have abandoned their former ideal of evangelization and adopted a new policy, according to which missionaries enter into solidarity with the people in whose midst they serve, bear the burdens of life with them, and promote the self-discovery and humanization taking place in their midst. In particular the churches have renounced the desire to convert the Jews; they have begun to call them brothers and sisters.

While these changes have taken place on the highest ecclesiastical level, in official circles and among Christians intensely involved in the problems of contemporary life, the effect of the new policy on the great majority of Christians is negligible. Most Christians have not even begun to reflect on these issues … the reason why the new policies adopted by the churches have so little power and influence among Christians is that the negation of Judaism and other religions seems to be built into the central Christian symbols. The corrections made on the margins hardly affect the central teaching. Since Christian teaching confesses Jesus as the one mediator between God and man, and the church as the true Israel, the unique vehicle of salvation, in whom the peoples of the world will find forgiveness and new life, the dangerous social trends against which the new ecclesiastical policies have reacted continue to affect the Christian understanding of history. Unless people are well informed and belong to a religious elite, the traditional language continues to shape their outlook and attitude. What is demanded, therefore, is that the churches interpret the central Christian doctrine, in obedience to God’s call, in a more socially responsible way and find a sound dogmatic basis for their new policies … (Auschwitz, Beginning of a New Era?, pp. 113, 116-117)

As we can see, Vatican II peritus Fr. Gregory Baum was not a convert to Catholicism, but rather, a subvert who sought to convert Catholics to a new religion as he stated explicitly himself: “… after Auschwitz … it is the Christian world that is in need of conversion.”

“After Auschwitz” is of course Baum’s designator for the measurement of time in the new dispensation he is operating in. As Calvary is replaced by Auschwitz in this new religion, so, Anno Domini is replaced by Anno Auschwitz. If you believe that I’m reading into his words, then listen to co-speaker Johannes Hoekendijk in his response to Baum’s paper:

“Are we anno Auschwitz 30 in a new era? That is what the theme of our colloquium suggests … After Auschwitz: The State of Israel–A New era.” (ibid p.129)

Note that Gregory Baum lamented in 1974 that while he and his comrades in Rome were inebriated on the new “Holocaust” religion that the laity in the pews hadn’t yet received the message. I imagine that he must be quite pleased with the “Holocaust” religion teaching opportunity which materialized in January-February 2009 HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE.

Fr. Baum speaks at length on the topic of the revised Vatican II “mission” of the Church which negates Catholic traditional missionary theology and activity which he was involved in formulating. Just as the central dogmas of Catholicism are subordinate to “Holocaust” theology as quoted above, so is Christian missionary activity, in Gregory Baum’s universe:

“The new openness to the Jewish faith and the emergence of a new understanding of mission reflect the response of the Christian conscience to the voice of the Holocaust …

Fr. Baum repeats his delusional language suggesting that God, speaking in judgment through “The Holocaust,” is commanding this change in mission:

“The churches believe that they have been addressed by God’s Word through these events: they have placed themselves under God’s judgment.” (ibid p.116)

Gregory Baum proposed a replacement theology in which the “existence” of “The Jews” is the first principle to which even the most fundamental Catholic dogmas must yield. I reiterate that it is a Vatican II peritus who wrote these things 35 years ago. Clearly we can see in recent events that many prelates in and outside the Vatican have made these lunatic ideas their own.

See:

The New Catholic “Shoah” Theology: Newsletter #47

"Auschwitz: Beginning of a New Era?"

April 28, 2009

I have been reading a book titled, Auschwitz: Beginning of a New Era? This is a collection of papers given at an “International Symposium on the Holocaust” held at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City, June 3 to 6, 1974. The book is edited by Eva Fleischer and published by the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine and the “Anti-Defamation League” of “B’nai B’rith.”

The title of the book should be Theological Contrivances Rationalizing Displacement of Calvary by Auschwitz to be Taught in Christian Churches and Schools because that is precisely what Catholic priests, Protestant ministers, rabbis and others including Elie Wiesel came together to synthesize at this symposium.

Gregory Baum was a Judaic (alleged) convert to Catholicism and Catholic priest, assistant to Cardinal Bea and peritus (theological advisor) at the Second Vatican Council, particularly on the three most troubling Vatican II documents, Dignitatis Humanæ, Unitatis Redintegratio and Nostra Aetate. For the moment I will focus primarily on his words because he was a priest of great influence in Rome and at the Vatican II Council.

Getting straight to business, Fr. Gregory Baum opened his talk thus:

After Auschwitz the Christian churches no longer wish to convert the Jews. While they may not be sure of the theological grounds that dispense them from this mission, the churches have become aware that asking the Jews to become Christians is a spiritual way of blotting them out of existence and thus only reinforces the effects of the Holocaust. The churches, moreover, realize the deadly irony implicit in a Christian plea for the conversion of the Jews; for after Auschwitz and the participation of the nations, it is the Christian world that is in need of conversion. The major churches have come to repudiate mission to the Jews, even if they have not justified this by adequate doctrinal explanations. We have here a case, frequently found in church history, where a practical decision on the part of the churches, in response to a significant event, precedes dogmatic reflection and in fact becomes the guide to future doctrinal development. Moved by a sense of shame over the doctrinal formulations that negate Jewish existence, the churches have come to recognize Judaism as an authentic religion before God, with independent value and meaning, not as a stage on the way to Christianity …

The new openness to Jewish faith and the emergence of a new understanding of mission reflect the response of the Christian conscience to the voice of the Holocaust … The churches believe that they have been addressed by God’s Word through these events: they have placed themselves under God’s judgment.

Fr. Baum later returns to this idea that “God’s Word” is spoken to the “Christian conscience” through “The Holocaust” and explains what is “demanded” in response to “God’s call.”

Even without elaborating an adequate dogmatic basis, they have made significant public declarations and changed the public policy in remarkable ways. Christian theologians have reflected on the new trends and tried to establish their doctrinal foundation. Christian educators have begun to rewrite catechisms and schoolbooks. Many missionary congregations and Christian-action groups have abandoned their former ideal of evangelization and adopted a new policy, according to which missionaries enter into solidarity with the people in whose midst they serve, bear the burdens of life with them, and promote the self-discovery and humanization taking place in their midst. In particular the churches have renounced the desire to convert the Jews; they have begun to call them brothers and sisters.

While these changes have taken place on the highest ecclesiastical level, in official circles and among Christians intensely involved in the problems of contemporary life, the effect of the new policy on the great majority of Christians is negligible. Most Christians have not even begun to reflect on these issues … the reason why the new policies adopted by the churches have so little power and influence among Christians is that the negation of Judaism and other religions seems to be built into the central Christian symbols. The corrections made on the margins hardly affect the central teaching. Since Christian teaching confesses Jesus as the one mediator between God and man, and the church as the true Israel, the unique vehicle of salvation, in whom the peoples of the world will find forgiveness and new life, the dangerous social trends against which the new ecclesiastical policies have reacted continue to affect the Christian understanding of history. Unless people are well informed and belong to a religious elite, the traditional language continues to shape their outlook and attitude. What is demanded, therefore, is that the churches interpret the central Christian doctrine, in obedience to God’s call, in a more socially responsible way and find a sound dogmatic basis for their new policies … (Auschwitz, Beginning of a New Era?, pp. 113, 116-117)

As we can see, Vatican II peritus Fr. Gregory Baum was not a convert to Catholicism, but rather, a subvert who sought to convert Catholics to a new religion as he stated explicitly himself: “… after Auschwitz … it is the Christian world that is in need of conversion.”

“After Auschwitz” is of course Baum’s designator for the measurement of time in the new dispensation he is operating in. As Calvary is replaced by Auschwitz in this new religion, so, Anno Domini is replaced by Anno Auschwitz. If you believe that I’m reading into his words, then listen to co-speaker Johannes Hoekendijk in his response to Baum’s paper:

“Are we anno Auschwitz 30 in a new era? That is what the theme of our colloquium suggests … After Auschwitz: The State of Israel–A New era.” (ibid p.129)

Note that Gregory Baum lamented in 1974 that while he and his comrades in Rome were inebriated on the new “Holocaust” religion that the laity in the pews hadn’t yet received the message. I imagine that he must be quite pleased with the “Holocaust” religion teaching opportunity which materialized in January-February 2009 HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE.

Fr. Baum speaks at length on the topic of the revised Vatican II “mission” of the Church which negates Catholic traditional missionary theology and activity which he was involved in formulating. Just as the central dogmas of Catholicism are subordinate to “Holocaust” theology as quoted above, so is Christian missionary activity, in Gregory Baum’s universe:

“The new openness to the Jewish faith and the emergence of a new understanding of mission reflect the response of the Christian conscience to the voice of the Holocaust …

Fr. Baum repeats his delusional language suggesting that God, speaking in judgment through “The Holocaust,” is commanding this change in mission:

“The churches believe that they have been addressed by God’s Word through these events: they have placed themselves under God’s judgment.” (ibid p.116)

Gregory Baum proposed a replacement theology in which the “existence” of “The Jews” is the first principle to which even the most fundamental Catholic dogmas must yield. I reiterate that it is a Vatican II peritus who wrote these things 35 years ago. Clearly we can see in recent events that many prelates in and outside the Vatican have made these lunatic ideas their own.

See:

The New Catholic “Shoah” Theology: Newsletter #47

Cardinal O’Malley Participates in "Yom HaShoah" Liturgy

April 26, 2009

http://www.necn.com/avp27.swf?Lm).mv1)U)~Sl$RrhclFyuy1:oWzks$y0Dlj8bssH28C#nVZA-pofl3W&!3bv16,owzS'-P?r69XQSF/H0X:-6$wr2XyLTQ7tFbj2-;Y,5NVCB~-Pg35Ceb0#toGjn)q5esgn)cRW5PR(jXO|*nYef(T174N;NijmTKCH110rg0D@,kXlpdM_.OfH,,ZqaY9k4pYP2##k;usWrmNdx_limow|Bq'0OpJ'f1SIadV-g(RP116

Cardinal O’Malley Participates in "Yom HaShoah" Liturgy

April 26, 2009

NY’s New Archbishop Gets Straight to Work

April 24, 2009

The “traditional ‘Jewish’ Passover Haggadah” began to be formulated in the Talmudic Era, centuries after Christ. The Haggadah as it exists today dates only to the 13th century, but this is no impediment to the bishops and rabbis teaching Catholic children that Jesus and the Apostles celebrated this ritual. One wonders if Bishop Dolan and Abe Foxman were reciting the Shefokh Hamatkha (“Pour Out Thy Wrath,” which Orthodox Judaism applies to Christendom) at the time this photo was taken.

NY Archbishop Joins Catholic And Jewish Students In Symbolic Passover Seder

ADL

New York, NY, April 22, 2009 … Extolling the virtues of unity, religious acceptance and interfaith cooperation, New York Archbishop Timothy Dolan shared a symbolic Passover Seder with a group of Catholic and Jewish students.

“Today, ADL joins our Catholic friends and neighbors in offering our hearty welcome to Archbishop Dolan as the 10th Archbishop of New York,” said Abraham H. Foxman, ADL National Director. “We look forward to working with Archbishop Dolan to enhance the ongoing dialogue and programs between the Archdiocese and the Jewish community. The Catholic-Jewish relationship in New York is unique and has contributed to Catholic-Jewish understanding that has set an example that reaches beyond our city.”

Mr. Foxman led the group in reciting two Jewish blessings made in the Archbishop’s honor, and presented Archbishop Dolan with a mezuzah, a traditional encasing of parchment scroll, to affix to the doorpost of his new residence.

“This is awesome for me,” Archbishop Dolan said. “I have long admired the work of the Anti-Defamation League from afar, and now to receive your welcome and your assurances of our hope for future cooperation, which I enthusiastically share, means very much to me.”

During the Seder, which occurred one day after Holocaust Memorial Day, Archbishop Dolan discussed the importance of mutual respect and religious acceptance.

“Every person deserves dignity and respect. They [the Jewish people] learned the hard way, the tragic way what happens when that fundamental religious belief is not respected, and we now unite with them and hold hands in seeing that that never happens again.

“I look forward to our cooperation that’s been part of the legacy and the heritage here in the greater New York community.”

Seder participants asked the Four Questions of Passover, recounted the ten plagues inflicted on ancient Egypt and ate matzo – the traditional Passover unleavened bread. Each table contained the traditional Passover Seder plate, as well as multi-colored jellybeans to represent diversity, and twizzlers candy to represent the whips of slavery.

Students from each school made presentations about the history of slavery – from biblical to modern times. Students from the Immaculate Conception school also led a group performance of two choir pieces.

The Interfaith Seder program, now in its fourth year and hosted by the Intergroup Committee of ADL’s New York Regional Board, recognizes the universal bonds of oppression and slavery that are shared by many races, religions and cultures. It is an outgrowth of the League’s Bearing Witness™ Program, an annual Holocaust training for Catholic school teachers.

http://www.adl.org/PresRele/ChJew_31/5510_31.htm

NY’s New Archbishop Gets Straight to Work

April 24, 2009

The “traditional ‘Jewish’ Passover Haggadah” began to be formulated in the Talmudic Era, centuries after Christ. The Haggadah as it exists today dates only to the 13th century, but this is no impediment to the bishops and rabbis teaching Catholic children that Jesus and the Apostles celebrated this ritual. One wonders if Bishop Dolan and Abe Foxman were reciting the Shefokh Hamatkha (“Pour Out Thy Wrath,” which Orthodox Judaism applies to Christendom) at the time this photo was taken.

NY Archbishop Joins Catholic And Jewish Students In Symbolic Passover Seder

ADL

New York, NY, April 22, 2009 … Extolling the virtues of unity, religious acceptance and interfaith cooperation, New York Archbishop Timothy Dolan shared a symbolic Passover Seder with a group of Catholic and Jewish students.

“Today, ADL joins our Catholic friends and neighbors in offering our hearty welcome to Archbishop Dolan as the 10th Archbishop of New York,” said Abraham H. Foxman, ADL National Director. “We look forward to working with Archbishop Dolan to enhance the ongoing dialogue and programs between the Archdiocese and the Jewish community. The Catholic-Jewish relationship in New York is unique and has contributed to Catholic-Jewish understanding that has set an example that reaches beyond our city.”

Mr. Foxman led the group in reciting two Jewish blessings made in the Archbishop’s honor, and presented Archbishop Dolan with a mezuzah, a traditional encasing of parchment scroll, to affix to the doorpost of his new residence.

“This is awesome for me,” Archbishop Dolan said. “I have long admired the work of the Anti-Defamation League from afar, and now to receive your welcome and your assurances of our hope for future cooperation, which I enthusiastically share, means very much to me.”

During the Seder, which occurred one day after Holocaust Memorial Day, Archbishop Dolan discussed the importance of mutual respect and religious acceptance.

“Every person deserves dignity and respect. They [the Jewish people] learned the hard way, the tragic way what happens when that fundamental religious belief is not respected, and we now unite with them and hold hands in seeing that that never happens again.

“I look forward to our cooperation that’s been part of the legacy and the heritage here in the greater New York community.”

Seder participants asked the Four Questions of Passover, recounted the ten plagues inflicted on ancient Egypt and ate matzo – the traditional Passover unleavened bread. Each table contained the traditional Passover Seder plate, as well as multi-colored jellybeans to represent diversity, and twizzlers candy to represent the whips of slavery.

Students from each school made presentations about the history of slavery – from biblical to modern times. Students from the Immaculate Conception school also led a group performance of two choir pieces.

The Interfaith Seder program, now in its fourth year and hosted by the Intergroup Committee of ADL’s New York Regional Board, recognizes the universal bonds of oppression and slavery that are shared by many races, religions and cultures. It is an outgrowth of the League’s Bearing Witness™ Program, an annual Holocaust training for Catholic school teachers.

http://www.adl.org/PresRele/ChJew_31/5510_31.htm

NY’s New Archbishop Gets Straight to Work

April 24, 2009

The “traditional ‘Jewish’ Passover Haggadah” began to be formulated in the Talmudic Era, centuries after Christ. The Haggadah as it exists today dates only to the 13th century, but this is no impediment to the bishops and rabbis teaching Catholic children that Jesus and the Apostles celebrated this ritual. One wonders if Bishop Dolan and Abe Foxman were reciting the Shefokh Hamatkha (“Pour Out Thy Wrath,” which Orthodox Judaism applies to Christendom) at the time this photo was taken.

NY Archbishop Joins Catholic And Jewish Students In Symbolic Passover Seder

ADL

New York, NY, April 22, 2009 … Extolling the virtues of unity, religious acceptance and interfaith cooperation, New York Archbishop Timothy Dolan shared a symbolic Passover Seder with a group of Catholic and Jewish students.

“Today, ADL joins our Catholic friends and neighbors in offering our hearty welcome to Archbishop Dolan as the 10th Archbishop of New York,” said Abraham H. Foxman, ADL National Director. “We look forward to working with Archbishop Dolan to enhance the ongoing dialogue and programs between the Archdiocese and the Jewish community. The Catholic-Jewish relationship in New York is unique and has contributed to Catholic-Jewish understanding that has set an example that reaches beyond our city.”

Mr. Foxman led the group in reciting two Jewish blessings made in the Archbishop’s honor, and presented Archbishop Dolan with a mezuzah, a traditional encasing of parchment scroll, to affix to the doorpost of his new residence.

“This is awesome for me,” Archbishop Dolan said. “I have long admired the work of the Anti-Defamation League from afar, and now to receive your welcome and your assurances of our hope for future cooperation, which I enthusiastically share, means very much to me.”

During the Seder, which occurred one day after Holocaust Memorial Day, Archbishop Dolan discussed the importance of mutual respect and religious acceptance.

“Every person deserves dignity and respect. They [the Jewish people] learned the hard way, the tragic way what happens when that fundamental religious belief is not respected, and we now unite with them and hold hands in seeing that that never happens again.

“I look forward to our cooperation that’s been part of the legacy and the heritage here in the greater New York community.”

Seder participants asked the Four Questions of Passover, recounted the ten plagues inflicted on ancient Egypt and ate matzo – the traditional Passover unleavened bread. Each table contained the traditional Passover Seder plate, as well as multi-colored jellybeans to represent diversity, and twizzlers candy to represent the whips of slavery.

Students from each school made presentations about the history of slavery – from biblical to modern times. Students from the Immaculate Conception school also led a group performance of two choir pieces.

The Interfaith Seder program, now in its fourth year and hosted by the Intergroup Committee of ADL’s New York Regional Board, recognizes the universal bonds of oppression and slavery that are shared by many races, religions and cultures. It is an outgrowth of the League’s Bearing Witness™ Program, an annual Holocaust training for Catholic school teachers.

http://www.adl.org/PresRele/ChJew_31/5510_31.htm

Racists Control Discourse on Racism at Fordham

April 21, 2009
DURBAN II “COUNTER-CONFERENCE”:

Addressing the Issues of Racism, Racial Discrimination, Genocide,
Xenophobia, Gender Discrimination and Religious Discrimination
April 20 – 24, 2009

Fordham Law School
140 West 62nd Street
New York City

Co-Sponsors

American Jewish Committee
American Jewish International Relations Institute
American Zionist Movement
Anti-Defamation League
Association of Reform Zionists of America
B’nai B’rith International
Central Conference of American Rabbis
Eye on the UN
Hadassah International Council of Jewish Women
Jewish Council for Public Affairs
Jewish Women International
National Council of Jewish Women
New York Board of Rabbis
ORT America · Rabbinical Assembly
Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism
Scholars for Peace in the Middle East · Touro Law School
Union for Reform Judaism
United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism
Women of Reform Judaism
Women’s International Zionist Organization
World Council of Conservative/Masorti Synagogues
World Jewish Congress
Yale Initiative for the Interdisciplinary Study of Anti-Semitism

http://www.jewishlawyers.org/media/user/documents/AAJLJ_program_for_circulation.pdf

According to the program for this conference Dr. Phyllis Chesler will give a talk titled, “Discrimination Against Muslim Women.” This would be a fine opportunity to ask Dr. Chesler when she intends to address Orthodox Judaic discrimination against women …

Jerusalem’s Taliban

“God’s Chosen” Cavemen

Move to the back of the (Judaic) Bus!

… confront the rabbis on their phony “save Darfur” coalition …

http://eaazi.blogspot.com/2009/04/harvard-book-store-mamdani-darfur.html#respond

… confront Abe Foxman on his holocaust denial …

ADL local leader fired on Armenian issue

… and level appropriate criticism of the racist nature of “The Jewish State” which its advocates are attempting to escape by “co-hosting” a counter-conference entirely controlled by them.

Gaza Massacre Fosters Race Hatred in Israeli Youth

The Rabbis’ Anti-Black Teachings of Hatred in Practice

“Elder Brother” Rabbi Eliyahu: “One yeshiva boy is worth more than the lives of 1,000 Arabs”

Racist Knesset Clears Itself of Racism

Racists Control Discourse on Racism at Fordham

April 21, 2009
DURBAN II “COUNTER-CONFERENCE”:

Addressing the Issues of Racism, Racial Discrimination, Genocide,
Xenophobia, Gender Discrimination and Religious Discrimination
April 20 – 24, 2009

Fordham Law School
140 West 62nd Street
New York City

Co-Sponsors

American Jewish Committee
American Jewish International Relations Institute
American Zionist Movement
Anti-Defamation League
Association of Reform Zionists of America
B’nai B’rith International
Central Conference of American Rabbis
Eye on the UN
Hadassah International Council of Jewish Women
Jewish Council for Public Affairs
Jewish Women International
National Council of Jewish Women
New York Board of Rabbis
ORT America · Rabbinical Assembly
Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism
Scholars for Peace in the Middle East · Touro Law School
Union for Reform Judaism
United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism
Women of Reform Judaism
Women’s International Zionist Organization
World Council of Conservative/Masorti Synagogues
World Jewish Congress
Yale Initiative for the Interdisciplinary Study of Anti-Semitism

http://www.jewishlawyers.org/media/user/documents/AAJLJ_program_for_circulation.pdf

According to the program for this conference Dr. Phyllis Chesler will give a talk titled, “Discrimination Against Muslim Women.” This would be a fine opportunity to ask Dr. Chesler when she intends to address Orthodox Judaic discrimination against women …

Jerusalem’s Taliban

“God’s Chosen” Cavemen

Move to the back of the (Judaic) Bus!

… confront the rabbis on their phony “save Darfur” coalition …

http://eaazi.blogspot.com/2009/04/harvard-book-store-mamdani-darfur.html#respond

… confront Abe Foxman on his holocaust denial …

ADL local leader fired on Armenian issue

… and level appropriate criticism of the racist nature of “The Jewish State” which its advocates are attempting to escape by “co-hosting” a counter-conference entirely controlled by them.

Gaza Massacre Fosters Race Hatred in Israeli Youth

The Rabbis’ Anti-Black Teachings of Hatred in Practice

“Elder Brother” Rabbi Eliyahu: “One yeshiva boy is worth more than the lives of 1,000 Arabs”

Racist Knesset Clears Itself of Racism