Archive for May, 2008

Riskin to Launch Noahide Center

May 30, 2008

Riskin to launch interfaith center

Jewish Telegraph Agency

05/29/2008

Rabbi Shlomo Riskin is launching an Orthodox center for dialogue with Christians.

Organizers of the Center for Jewish-Christian Understanding and Cooperation say it is the first Orthodox Jewish institution of its kind dedicated to theological dialogue with Christians.

The center, which is slated to open in June in Efrat, Israel, will host seminars for Jewish and Christian scholars and promote research aimed at making religion an instrument of peace in the world.

“A sea change has occurred since the Shoah,” Riskin, the chief rabbi of Efrat, told the Christian Post. “Most churches now teach that God remains faithful to His covenant with the Jewish people, and that the biblical promise is continually being reaffirmed by the Jewish return to its homeland in Zion.”

http://www.jta.org/cgi-bin/iowa/breaking/108822.html

In January 2008, in a Jerusalem Post editorial, Rabbi Shlomo Riskin reminded his fellow so-called “Jews” that they’re obligated to proselytize the “Goyim” to follow the anti-Biblical Talmudic “Noahide Laws:”

… Maimonides rules that only the Jews must keep the 613 commandments for ultimate “salvation”; it is enough for the gentile world to accept the Seven Noahide Laws of morality (Laws of Kings [Hilchot Melachim] 8,10).

But we certainly must proselytize every human being to keep those seven laws … (Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, “Parashat Yitro: Every Knee Shall Bend,” Jerusalem Post, Jan 24, 2008)

See:

Who Says Judaism Isn’t a Proselytizing System?

Riskin to Launch Noahide Center

May 30, 2008

Riskin to launch interfaith center

Jewish Telegraph Agency

05/29/2008

Rabbi Shlomo Riskin is launching an Orthodox center for dialogue with Christians.

Organizers of the Center for Jewish-Christian Understanding and Cooperation say it is the first Orthodox Jewish institution of its kind dedicated to theological dialogue with Christians.

The center, which is slated to open in June in Efrat, Israel, will host seminars for Jewish and Christian scholars and promote research aimed at making religion an instrument of peace in the world.

“A sea change has occurred since the Shoah,” Riskin, the chief rabbi of Efrat, told the Christian Post. “Most churches now teach that God remains faithful to His covenant with the Jewish people, and that the biblical promise is continually being reaffirmed by the Jewish return to its homeland in Zion.”

http://www.jta.org/cgi-bin/iowa/breaking/108822.html

In January 2008, in a Jerusalem Post editorial, Rabbi Shlomo Riskin reminded his fellow so-called “Jews” that they’re obligated to proselytize the “Goyim” to follow the anti-Biblical Talmudic “Noahide Laws:”

… Maimonides rules that only the Jews must keep the 613 commandments for ultimate “salvation”; it is enough for the gentile world to accept the Seven Noahide Laws of morality (Laws of Kings [Hilchot Melachim] 8,10).

But we certainly must proselytize every human being to keep those seven laws … (Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, “Parashat Yitro: Every Knee Shall Bend,” Jerusalem Post, Jan 24, 2008)

See:

Who Says Judaism Isn’t a Proselytizing System?

Important 2005 Article on Benedict and the Rabbis

May 29, 2008

As it turns out, this 2005 New York Sun article which a reader called attention to was prophetic. It foretold of Benedict’s 2008 Good Friday prayer for the Jews that he tacked onto the 1962 Missal. According to former World Jewish Congress official and Edgar Bronfman crony, Rabbi Israel Singer, Benedict had told him he would make such a change in 1993 during a visit to his Vatican apartment:

In 1993 … Rabbi Singer … visited Cardinal Ratzinger at home … Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Singer said, listened carefully to concerns about aspects of the Catholic liturgy, “and he said he was going to change that liturgy which was unacceptable because it causes anti-Semitism.”

Rabbi Singer, a man who Norman Finkelstein has fittingly called a “repellent sewer rat,” was recently kicked out of the WJC. As it turns out, he’s too corrupt even for the Judaic mafia. How interesting that such a character would influence the Catholic liturgy. More on Rabbi Singer:

The Vatican Mafia

There’s No Racket Like the Shoah Racket

Lustiger’s NY Yeshiva Tour, Endorsement of Chabad Lubavitch as Religious Model

Cardinal Jean-Pierre Ricard of Ecclesia Dei Commission Studying Talmud at NY Yeshiva

There are many other points of interest in this article. Searches of this blog for the rabbis mentioned below will turn up much information.

How Future Pope Won the Respect of Jewish Leaders

By MEGHAN CLYNE, Staff Reporter of the Sun
April 22, 2005

In the days since Pope Benedict XVI’s election, many critics have tarred him as an intolerant ideologue, insensitive to people of other faiths. Several New York Jewish leaders, however, while recounting their personal experiences with Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, described the future pope as a gentle, humble, learned man, a brilliant theological mind, and a devoted ecclesiastical leader in whom Jews will find an important ally.

The chairman of the World Jewish Congress, Rabbi Israel Singer, remembered a trip to Rome in which he visited the then-cardinal’s personal apartment, which he said illustrated Benedict’s personality.

In 1993, Rabbi Singer said, he was at the Vatican in anticipation of Pope John Paul II’s historic declaration that the Holy See would officially recognize and maintain diplomatic relations with the state of Israel. On the eve of the announcement, Rabbi Singer said, he visited Cardinal Ratzinger at home to discuss the theological implications of the decision, of which the cardinal was a staunch supporter.

Although his residence was nestled amidst the elaborate Baroque architecture of the Vatican, Rabbi Singer said, the interior of the cardinal’s quarters was extraordinarily spare, with a German simplicity in its appointments and furnishings.

“You got the impression you were in the home of a very, very modest person,” Rabbi Singer said. “All you saw in that apartment were books – books, and books, and books, all with yellow slips with markings on them, which showed these books had all been read.”

The expansiveness of the future pope’s personal library, and the orderliness with which it was arranged, reflected the breadth, depth, and discipline of the pontiff’s intellect, Rabbi Singer said.

“He’s very fair … very thoughtful, very deep-thinking,” Rabbi Singer said of Benedict. Contrary to depictions of him as a fierce, unreflective dogmatist, the pontiff “doesn’t come to a conclusion until he’s solved all the problems and questions,” Rabbi Singer said.

Benedict’s contemplative sensitivity, the New York rabbi added, manifested itself in his responsiveness to Jewish leaders’ anxieties. Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Singer said, listened carefully to concerns about aspects of the Catholic liturgy, “and he said he was going to change that liturgy which was unacceptable because it causes anti-Semitism.”

On another occasion, Rabbi Singer said, he discussed a Jewish-Catholic relief operation in Argentina with the cardinal, wondering whether – given that it was unusual for the church to suggest such collaboration with Jews – the undertaking was theologically sound.

“He listened carefully,” Rabbi Singer said, “and then said, ‘This is a very important task, bless you.’ “

“He smiled, and he said he felt this is what religion should be known for – that this is the most important aspect of the dialogue,” Rabbi Singer added.

Sometimes, Benedict’s dialogue with Jews has been conducted quietly, not in his capacity as the guardian of Catholic orthodoxy, but as a private citizen and inquisitive theologian.

A theology professor at Bard College, Rabbi Jacob Neusner, has been a regular correspondent with Benedict for the past 15 years.

Rabbi Neusner is the author of several books on Jewish theology, including translations into English of rabbinic texts. While working on a volume about the historical Jesus in 1989, he said, he came across some of Cardinal Ratzinger’s writings on the subject. Rabbi Neusner sent him a letter praising his work, and the cardinal’s response initiated a continuing communication on matters of theological scholarship.

In the course of their epistolary dialogue, Rabbi Neusner said, Cardinal Ratzinger proved himself “a very fine scholar, very smart, and very sensitive.”

When Rabbi Neusner wrote “A Rabbi Talks With Jesus” in 1994 – a book in which Rabbi Neusner says that, had he been present for the Sermon on the Mount, he would not have followed Jesus – Cardinal Ratzinger, whose English is described as excellent, sent him a blurb for the jacket.

Despite its rejection of Christian teachings, Benedict wrote of Rabbi Neusner’s work: “The absolute honesty, the precision of analysis, the union of respect for the other party with carefully grounded loyalty to one’s own position characterize the book and make it a challenge especially to Christians, who will have to ponder the analysis of the conflict between Moses and Jesus.”

Rabbi Neusner and several other Jewish leaders said Benedict’s unflinching conviction in his own faith was hardly a liability, but was precisely what made him such a valuable interlocutor – because he could appreciate Jewish leaders’ staunch belief in the truth of their own religion.

The basis of interfaith dialogue with Benedict, they said, was mutual respect and a celebration of common convictions, rather than a push to evangelize or demand alterations to doctrine. That attitude, the head of inter-religious affairs for the American Jewish Committee, Rabbi David Rosen, said, would “develop a very healthy, productive relationship.”

“I think that generally within the Jewish community, they’ll recognize that in Pope Benedict XVI we have a friend,” Rabbi Rosen said by phone from Israel yesterday.

Indeed, much of the perception of Benedict as intolerant toward other faiths was the result of a misinterpretation of his 2000 encyclical “Dominus Iesus,” the director of interfaith affairs at the Anti-Defamation League, Rabbi Gary Bretton-Granatoor, said. In the encyclical, Cardinal Ratzinger reasserted the fundamental church doctrine that salvation is attainable only through Roman Catholicism.

Of the document, Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor said: “I don’t believe it really has anything to do with his understanding of Jews and Judaism.”

“Dominus Iesus” was directed more at the problems of orthodoxy within Christendom, including deviations by Protestant sects, Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor said. It was also issued as a directive to errant factions within the Catholic Church, particularly those embracing syncretism – the attempt to blend doctrine with local customs in places where Catholicism is growing.

The encyclical, Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor said, should not be read as hostility toward Jews on Benedict’s part. “In his mind … Judaism exists on an entirely different plane than any other religion,” he said.

And because Cardinal Ratzinger, as head of the church’s Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith, helped provide the theological underpinnings of the conciliatory overtures to Judaism during John Paul II’s papacy, there was no reason to suspect any ill will toward Jews on Benedict’s part, the director of the Anti-Defamation League, Abraham Foxman, said. “I’m convinced he will carry on that tradition,” Mr. Foxman said.

Indeed, further indications that Benedict intends to continue John Paul’s legacy emerged from Rome yesterday, where the new pontiff reconfirmed all of the heads of the Vatican Curia who had served under his predecessor, the Daily Telegraph reported.

If Benedict’s ecclesiastical past boded well for the church’s future relations with Judaism, at first glance his personal history – particularly his coerced membership in the Hitler Youth as a teenager in Germany – might not. There seems to be a consensus, however, that Benedict’s biography is not cause for concern among the Jewish community.

To the contrary, in the view of the Park East Synagogue’s Rabbi Arthur Schneier, “Because Benedict grew up in a country that inflicted tyranny,” the rabbi said, “he has a greater appreciation of freedom and liberty.”

Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor, too, saw some advantage in Benedict being a German. “It’s not like I have to explain anti-Semitism to somebody who’s never experienced it,” he said.

Indeed, a founding member of the Interfaith Theological Forum of the Pope John Paul II Center at Washington, Rabbi Leon Klenicki, said Benedict expressed great sensitivity to Jewish theological questions arising from the Holocaust.

Rabbi Klenicki, who met several times with Cardinal Ratzinger, recounted a discussion with the prelate on the question: “How could God be silent when 1 million children went to the gas chambers?” That inquiry, Rabbi Klenicki said, presents a “very serious problem” in the Jewish community, “and not so much in the Christian community.” Yet Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Klenicki said, “listened with total attention and fervor, realizing the pain of what I was talking about.”

In Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Klenicki said, he found an empathetic man who seeks and appreciates the presence of God in every person, regardless of creed. “He was very attentive … listening to you with all his heart,” he said.

That thoughtful aspect of Benedict would be well-received by Jews, Rabbi Neusner said, because of the honor Judaism accords serious religious study. “I think the people will really appreciate him, because they appreciate intellect … and they honor learning,” he said.

Rabbi Neusner congratulated Benedict on his new post. “I wrote him a letter saying that, as he knows … Benedict means ‘blessed’ – and that’s my hope for his pontificate,” Rabbi Neusner said. “Somewhere within a few months, there’ll be a very gracious reply,” the rabbi predicted.

http://www.nysun.com/foreign/how-future-pope-won-the-respect-of-jewish-leaders/12646/

Important 2005 Article on Benedict and the Rabbis

May 29, 2008

As it turns out, this 2005 New York Sun article which a reader called attention to was prophetic. It foretold of Benedict’s 2008 Good Friday prayer for the Jews that he tacked onto the 1962 Missal. According to former World Jewish Congress official and Edgar Bronfman crony, Rabbi Israel Singer, Benedict had told him he would make such a change in 1993 during a visit to his Vatican apartment:

In 1993 … Rabbi Singer … visited Cardinal Ratzinger at home … Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Singer said, listened carefully to concerns about aspects of the Catholic liturgy, “and he said he was going to change that liturgy which was unacceptable because it causes anti-Semitism.”

Rabbi Singer, a man who Norman Finkelstein has fittingly called a “repellent sewer rat,” was recently kicked out of the WJC. As it turns out, he’s too corrupt even for the Judaic mafia. How interesting that such a character would influence the Catholic liturgy. More on Rabbi Singer:

The Vatican Mafia

There’s No Racket Like the Shoah Racket

Lustiger’s NY Yeshiva Tour, Endorsement of Chabad Lubavitch as Religious Model

Cardinal Jean-Pierre Ricard of Ecclesia Dei Commission Studying Talmud at NY Yeshiva

There are many other points of interest in this article. Searches of this blog for the rabbis mentioned below will turn up much information.

How Future Pope Won the Respect of Jewish Leaders

By MEGHAN CLYNE, Staff Reporter of the Sun
April 22, 2005

In the days since Pope Benedict XVI’s election, many critics have tarred him as an intolerant ideologue, insensitive to people of other faiths. Several New York Jewish leaders, however, while recounting their personal experiences with Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, described the future pope as a gentle, humble, learned man, a brilliant theological mind, and a devoted ecclesiastical leader in whom Jews will find an important ally.

The chairman of the World Jewish Congress, Rabbi Israel Singer, remembered a trip to Rome in which he visited the then-cardinal’s personal apartment, which he said illustrated Benedict’s personality.

In 1993, Rabbi Singer said, he was at the Vatican in anticipation of Pope John Paul II’s historic declaration that the Holy See would officially recognize and maintain diplomatic relations with the state of Israel. On the eve of the announcement, Rabbi Singer said, he visited Cardinal Ratzinger at home to discuss the theological implications of the decision, of which the cardinal was a staunch supporter.

Although his residence was nestled amidst the elaborate Baroque architecture of the Vatican, Rabbi Singer said, the interior of the cardinal’s quarters was extraordinarily spare, with a German simplicity in its appointments and furnishings.

“You got the impression you were in the home of a very, very modest person,” Rabbi Singer said. “All you saw in that apartment were books – books, and books, and books, all with yellow slips with markings on them, which showed these books had all been read.”

The expansiveness of the future pope’s personal library, and the orderliness with which it was arranged, reflected the breadth, depth, and discipline of the pontiff’s intellect, Rabbi Singer said.

“He’s very fair … very thoughtful, very deep-thinking,” Rabbi Singer said of Benedict. Contrary to depictions of him as a fierce, unreflective dogmatist, the pontiff “doesn’t come to a conclusion until he’s solved all the problems and questions,” Rabbi Singer said.

Benedict’s contemplative sensitivity, the New York rabbi added, manifested itself in his responsiveness to Jewish leaders’ anxieties. Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Singer said, listened carefully to concerns about aspects of the Catholic liturgy, “and he said he was going to change that liturgy which was unacceptable because it causes anti-Semitism.”

On another occasion, Rabbi Singer said, he discussed a Jewish-Catholic relief operation in Argentina with the cardinal, wondering whether – given that it was unusual for the church to suggest such collaboration with Jews – the undertaking was theologically sound.

“He listened carefully,” Rabbi Singer said, “and then said, ‘This is a very important task, bless you.’ “

“He smiled, and he said he felt this is what religion should be known for – that this is the most important aspect of the dialogue,” Rabbi Singer added.

Sometimes, Benedict’s dialogue with Jews has been conducted quietly, not in his capacity as the guardian of Catholic orthodoxy, but as a private citizen and inquisitive theologian.

A theology professor at Bard College, Rabbi Jacob Neusner, has been a regular correspondent with Benedict for the past 15 years.

Rabbi Neusner is the author of several books on Jewish theology, including translations into English of rabbinic texts. While working on a volume about the historical Jesus in 1989, he said, he came across some of Cardinal Ratzinger’s writings on the subject. Rabbi Neusner sent him a letter praising his work, and the cardinal’s response initiated a continuing communication on matters of theological scholarship.

In the course of their epistolary dialogue, Rabbi Neusner said, Cardinal Ratzinger proved himself “a very fine scholar, very smart, and very sensitive.”

When Rabbi Neusner wrote “A Rabbi Talks With Jesus” in 1994 – a book in which Rabbi Neusner says that, had he been present for the Sermon on the Mount, he would not have followed Jesus – Cardinal Ratzinger, whose English is described as excellent, sent him a blurb for the jacket.

Despite its rejection of Christian teachings, Benedict wrote of Rabbi Neusner’s work: “The absolute honesty, the precision of analysis, the union of respect for the other party with carefully grounded loyalty to one’s own position characterize the book and make it a challenge especially to Christians, who will have to ponder the analysis of the conflict between Moses and Jesus.”

Rabbi Neusner and several other Jewish leaders said Benedict’s unflinching conviction in his own faith was hardly a liability, but was precisely what made him such a valuable interlocutor – because he could appreciate Jewish leaders’ staunch belief in the truth of their own religion.

The basis of interfaith dialogue with Benedict, they said, was mutual respect and a celebration of common convictions, rather than a push to evangelize or demand alterations to doctrine. That attitude, the head of inter-religious affairs for the American Jewish Committee, Rabbi David Rosen, said, would “develop a very healthy, productive relationship.”

“I think that generally within the Jewish community, they’ll recognize that in Pope Benedict XVI we have a friend,” Rabbi Rosen said by phone from Israel yesterday.

Indeed, much of the perception of Benedict as intolerant toward other faiths was the result of a misinterpretation of his 2000 encyclical “Dominus Iesus,” the director of interfaith affairs at the Anti-Defamation League, Rabbi Gary Bretton-Granatoor, said. In the encyclical, Cardinal Ratzinger reasserted the fundamental church doctrine that salvation is attainable only through Roman Catholicism.

Of the document, Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor said: “I don’t believe it really has anything to do with his understanding of Jews and Judaism.”

“Dominus Iesus” was directed more at the problems of orthodoxy within Christendom, including deviations by Protestant sects, Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor said. It was also issued as a directive to errant factions within the Catholic Church, particularly those embracing syncretism – the attempt to blend doctrine with local customs in places where Catholicism is growing.

The encyclical, Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor said, should not be read as hostility toward Jews on Benedict’s part. “In his mind … Judaism exists on an entirely different plane than any other religion,” he said.

And because Cardinal Ratzinger, as head of the church’s Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith, helped provide the theological underpinnings of the conciliatory overtures to Judaism during John Paul II’s papacy, there was no reason to suspect any ill will toward Jews on Benedict’s part, the director of the Anti-Defamation League, Abraham Foxman, said. “I’m convinced he will carry on that tradition,” Mr. Foxman said.

Indeed, further indications that Benedict intends to continue John Paul’s legacy emerged from Rome yesterday, where the new pontiff reconfirmed all of the heads of the Vatican Curia who had served under his predecessor, the Daily Telegraph reported.

If Benedict’s ecclesiastical past boded well for the church’s future relations with Judaism, at first glance his personal history – particularly his coerced membership in the Hitler Youth as a teenager in Germany – might not. There seems to be a consensus, however, that Benedict’s biography is not cause for concern among the Jewish community.

To the contrary, in the view of the Park East Synagogue’s Rabbi Arthur Schneier, “Because Benedict grew up in a country that inflicted tyranny,” the rabbi said, “he has a greater appreciation of freedom and liberty.”

Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor, too, saw some advantage in Benedict being a German. “It’s not like I have to explain anti-Semitism to somebody who’s never experienced it,” he said.

Indeed, a founding member of the Interfaith Theological Forum of the Pope John Paul II Center at Washington, Rabbi Leon Klenicki, said Benedict expressed great sensitivity to Jewish theological questions arising from the Holocaust.

Rabbi Klenicki, who met several times with Cardinal Ratzinger, recounted a discussion with the prelate on the question: “How could God be silent when 1 million children went to the gas chambers?” That inquiry, Rabbi Klenicki said, presents a “very serious problem” in the Jewish community, “and not so much in the Christian community.” Yet Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Klenicki said, “listened with total attention and fervor, realizing the pain of what I was talking about.”

In Cardinal Ratzinger, Rabbi Klenicki said, he found an empathetic man who seeks and appreciates the presence of God in every person, regardless of creed. “He was very attentive … listening to you with all his heart,” he said.

That thoughtful aspect of Benedict would be well-received by Jews, Rabbi Neusner said, because of the honor Judaism accords serious religious study. “I think the people will really appreciate him, because they appreciate intellect … and they honor learning,” he said.

Rabbi Neusner congratulated Benedict on his new post. “I wrote him a letter saying that, as he knows … Benedict means ‘blessed’ – and that’s my hope for his pontificate,” Rabbi Neusner said. “Somewhere within a few months, there’ll be a very gracious reply,” the rabbi predicted.

http://www.nysun.com/foreign/how-future-pope-won-the-respect-of-jewish-leaders/12646/

Another Kosher Stations of the Cross Concocted for "World Youth Day"

May 28, 2008

In only 3 years’ time Benedict has far surpassed his predecessor in the areas of false ecumenism and philo-rabbinism, but he uses a traditional pastoral cross and vestments as compensation. Evidently, most church-goers are ripe for this swindle.

Will this upcoming Kosher-slaughtered version of the stations of the cross surpass last year’s rendition in which Christ’s suffering was relativised with WWII suffering of the so-called “Jews”?

See:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/04/benedicts-kosher-via-crucis.html

Catholic Church opts for diplomatic scripts so no one will get cross

Linda Morris – Sydney Morning Herald

May 29, 2008

… The church has changed one of its most popular devotions and a landmark event of World Youth Day to take account of the sensitivities of Jews and draw other Christian denominations into its youth celebrations.

In the Catholic tradition the Stations of the Cross, the depiction of the final hours of Jesus Christ, features 14 scenes including the fall of Jesus three times – but only eight have scriptural foundation. To make the event more appealing to all Christians, a Vatican-approved scriptural version, founded entirely on passages from the New Testament, will be adopted when it is staged in the streets of Sydney on July 18.

It is not the only concession the church is willing to make in the name of interfaith unity: scriptural texts, reflections and video commentaries will be carefully worked so that the scene at the Sydney Opera House in which Jesus is condemned does not incite anti-Semitic feeling.

The Pope will pray with Australian Christian leaders, including those from Anglican, Lutheran, Presbyterian and Eastern Rite churches in the St Mary’s Cathedral Crypt the morning of the Stations of the Cross. That will be followed by a meeting with the heads of non-Christian faiths, including the Islamic, Jewish, Buddhist and Hindu religions.

The Anglican Dean of Sydney, Phillip Jensen, has said he will not attend, and his brother, Dr Peter Jensen, the Archbishop, will be overseas, but the church expects a senior representative of Sydney Anglicans to attend.

The World Youth Day co-ordinator, Anthony Fisher, said all religions would receive a bounce from the public expression and celebration of faith.

“We’ve been in discussion with the Jewish community,” Bishop Fisher said. “We’re very conscious of the fear some people might have that enacting the Passion of Christ could incite anti-Semitic feelings and so we’ve had a long dialogue about how we can minimise any risk of that.

“We want to make it very clear to people that the Passion of Christ celebrated in the Stations of the Cross is not intended to be, is no excuse for being, an attack on anybody and certainly for nurturing any prejudices that people may have in their hearts.

“In the choice of scriptural texts you can choose ones that are less likely to be misinterpreted by people to encourage that kind of feeling and we’ve chosen those texts carefully and in consultation with others.”

Rabbi Jeremy Lawrence, senior rabbi of the Great Synagogue, said he had not seen the details but applauded the church’s attempts at positive dialogue between the two faiths. He had invited the Pope to visit the synagogue.

Bishop Fisher said invitations had yet to go out and it had not been decided whether the controversial Islamic cleric, the senior imam at the Lakemba Mosque, Sheik al-Hilaly would be among the invitees.

Malek Fahd Islamic School, a co-educational primary and high school in Greenacre, will host more than 300 Catholic pilgrims for the World Youth Day program.

The Catholic Archbishop, Cardinal George Pell, said internal research showed young Catholics were keen to bring non-Catholic friends to World Youth Day events …

http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/catholic-church-opts-for-diplomatic-scripts/2008/05/28/1211654124112.html

Another Kosher Stations of the Cross Concocted for "World Youth Day"

May 28, 2008

In only 3 years’ time Benedict has far surpassed his predecessor in the areas of false ecumenism and philo-rabbinism, but he uses a traditional pastoral cross and vestments as compensation. Evidently, most church-goers are ripe for this swindle.

Will this upcoming Kosher-slaughtered version of the stations of the cross surpass last year’s rendition in which Christ’s suffering was relativised with WWII suffering of the so-called “Jews”?

See:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/04/benedicts-kosher-via-crucis.html

Catholic Church opts for diplomatic scripts so no one will get cross

Linda Morris – Sydney Morning Herald

May 29, 2008

… The church has changed one of its most popular devotions and a landmark event of World Youth Day to take account of the sensitivities of Jews and draw other Christian denominations into its youth celebrations.

In the Catholic tradition the Stations of the Cross, the depiction of the final hours of Jesus Christ, features 14 scenes including the fall of Jesus three times – but only eight have scriptural foundation. To make the event more appealing to all Christians, a Vatican-approved scriptural version, founded entirely on passages from the New Testament, will be adopted when it is staged in the streets of Sydney on July 18.

It is not the only concession the church is willing to make in the name of interfaith unity: scriptural texts, reflections and video commentaries will be carefully worked so that the scene at the Sydney Opera House in which Jesus is condemned does not incite anti-Semitic feeling.

The Pope will pray with Australian Christian leaders, including those from Anglican, Lutheran, Presbyterian and Eastern Rite churches in the St Mary’s Cathedral Crypt the morning of the Stations of the Cross. That will be followed by a meeting with the heads of non-Christian faiths, including the Islamic, Jewish, Buddhist and Hindu religions.

The Anglican Dean of Sydney, Phillip Jensen, has said he will not attend, and his brother, Dr Peter Jensen, the Archbishop, will be overseas, but the church expects a senior representative of Sydney Anglicans to attend.

The World Youth Day co-ordinator, Anthony Fisher, said all religions would receive a bounce from the public expression and celebration of faith.

“We’ve been in discussion with the Jewish community,” Bishop Fisher said. “We’re very conscious of the fear some people might have that enacting the Passion of Christ could incite anti-Semitic feelings and so we’ve had a long dialogue about how we can minimise any risk of that.

“We want to make it very clear to people that the Passion of Christ celebrated in the Stations of the Cross is not intended to be, is no excuse for being, an attack on anybody and certainly for nurturing any prejudices that people may have in their hearts.

“In the choice of scriptural texts you can choose ones that are less likely to be misinterpreted by people to encourage that kind of feeling and we’ve chosen those texts carefully and in consultation with others.”

Rabbi Jeremy Lawrence, senior rabbi of the Great Synagogue, said he had not seen the details but applauded the church’s attempts at positive dialogue between the two faiths. He had invited the Pope to visit the synagogue.

Bishop Fisher said invitations had yet to go out and it had not been decided whether the controversial Islamic cleric, the senior imam at the Lakemba Mosque, Sheik al-Hilaly would be among the invitees.

Malek Fahd Islamic School, a co-educational primary and high school in Greenacre, will host more than 300 Catholic pilgrims for the World Youth Day program.

The Catholic Archbishop, Cardinal George Pell, said internal research showed young Catholics were keen to bring non-Catholic friends to World Youth Day events …

http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/catholic-church-opts-for-diplomatic-scripts/2008/05/28/1211654124112.html

Joe Lieberman to Host John Hagee’s "Night to Honor ‘Israel’"

May 27, 2008

Just a few days ago televangelist, John Hagee was “exposed” by the establishment media as a wicked “anti-‘semite'” providing Senator John McCain with a kosher pretext for distancing himself from the anti-Catholic, anti-Arab, warmongering crypto-rabbi lunatic whose endorsement he actively sought. That is the illusion.

Read: Sympathy For John Hagee

Now the reality: John McCain’s crony and possible running mate, Senator Joe Lieberman who claims (falsely) to be a Semite will be hosting Hagee’s third annual “Washington-‘Israel’ Summit” in July:

http://www.cufi.org/site/PageServer?pagename=events_washington_summit

Joe Lieberman to Host John Hagee’s "Night to Honor ‘Israel’"

May 27, 2008

Just a few days ago televangelist, John Hagee was “exposed” by the establishment media as a wicked “anti-‘semite'” providing Senator John McCain with a kosher pretext for distancing himself from the anti-Catholic, anti-Arab, warmongering crypto-rabbi lunatic whose endorsement he actively sought. That is the illusion.

Read: Sympathy For John Hagee

Now the reality: John McCain’s crony and possible running mate, Senator Joe Lieberman who claims (falsely) to be a Semite will be hosting Hagee’s third annual “Washington-‘Israel’ Summit” in July:

http://www.cufi.org/site/PageServer?pagename=events_washington_summit

Mukasey Brings His Talmud Background to Work at Attorney General’s Office

May 24, 2008

G.W. Bush appointed Orthodox Judaic Attorney General Michael Mukasey says it’s an act of patriotism for lawyers to create unconstitutional justification for torture of Arabs, but those who hold the lawyers accountable are “hostile and unforgiving.”

Friend of Chabad Lubavitch–the sect of genocidal racist Judaism whose Agriprocessors kosher slaughterhouse is facing numerous federal indictments including weapons, drugs, sex abuse and immigration violations charges presently–Michael Mukasey is true not to the U.S. Constitution, but to the Talmud, the text which the lawyer/rabbi racket he defends here is based in and which his defense is based upon.

Mukasey defends author of so-called torture memos

By LARA JAKES JORDAN

5/24/08

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General Michael Mukasey is defending former government lawyers who drew up the legal basis of the Bush administration’s use of harsh interrogation methods against terror suspects.

Mukasey told Boston College Law School graduates Friday that lawyers doing their part to protect the country in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks should not now be held liable or face criminal charges for doing so.

Mukasey did not mention any specific lawyers by name.

Former Deputy Assistant Attorney General John Yoo is facing at least one civil lawsuit and demands for his firing from Berkeley Law School. Yoo worked in the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel from 2001 to 2003.

While there, he wrote several memos legally defending the use of harsh interrogation tactics which are now under criticism by human rights groups and members of Congress. Yoo’s memos concluded that President Bush has broad, unfettered wartime authority that cannot be limited by domestic law or international bans on torture.

One memo defined torture, as recognized by U.S. law, as covering “only extreme acts” causing pain similar in intensity to that caused by organ failure or accompanying death.

An internal Justice Department investigation is now considering whether such advice was improper.

At the Friday ceremony, Mukasey lambasted critics seeking to bring lawsuits or charges against the lawyers. “The rhetoric of these discussions is hostile and unforgiving,” Mukasey said in his prepared remarks.

Mukasey’s confirmation as attorney general briefly stalled over the issue of waterboarding, an interrogation method simulating drowning that critics call torture. He has since refused to say whether waterboarding is illegal since it is no longer used by the CIA or military interrogators.


http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5imDvIlEBNgzKdqYgIuTUEzUEImrQD90RJT080

More on Michael Mukasey:

Who Will Call for the Separation of the Synagogue of Satan and State?

Orthodox Judaic Attorney General Mukasey to Light 30′ tall Menorah on White House Lawn

More Background on Talmudic Attorney General Mukasey

U.S. Attorney General Position Goes to Talmud Adherent

Bush Nominates Kol Nidre Upholding Talmudist for Attorney General

Mukasey Brings His Talmud Background to Work at Attorney General’s Office

May 24, 2008

G.W. Bush appointed Orthodox Judaic Attorney General Michael Mukasey says it’s an act of patriotism for lawyers to create unconstitutional justification for torture of Arabs, but those who hold the lawyers accountable are “hostile and unforgiving.”

Friend of Chabad Lubavitch–the sect of genocidal racist Judaism whose Agriprocessors kosher slaughterhouse is facing numerous federal indictments including weapons, drugs, sex abuse and immigration violations charges presently–Michael Mukasey is true not to the U.S. Constitution, but to the Talmud, the text which the lawyer/rabbi racket he defends here is based in and which his defense is based upon.

Mukasey defends author of so-called torture memos

By LARA JAKES JORDAN

5/24/08

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General Michael Mukasey is defending former government lawyers who drew up the legal basis of the Bush administration’s use of harsh interrogation methods against terror suspects.

Mukasey told Boston College Law School graduates Friday that lawyers doing their part to protect the country in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks should not now be held liable or face criminal charges for doing so.

Mukasey did not mention any specific lawyers by name.

Former Deputy Assistant Attorney General John Yoo is facing at least one civil lawsuit and demands for his firing from Berkeley Law School. Yoo worked in the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel from 2001 to 2003.

While there, he wrote several memos legally defending the use of harsh interrogation tactics which are now under criticism by human rights groups and members of Congress. Yoo’s memos concluded that President Bush has broad, unfettered wartime authority that cannot be limited by domestic law or international bans on torture.

One memo defined torture, as recognized by U.S. law, as covering “only extreme acts” causing pain similar in intensity to that caused by organ failure or accompanying death.

An internal Justice Department investigation is now considering whether such advice was improper.

At the Friday ceremony, Mukasey lambasted critics seeking to bring lawsuits or charges against the lawyers. “The rhetoric of these discussions is hostile and unforgiving,” Mukasey said in his prepared remarks.

Mukasey’s confirmation as attorney general briefly stalled over the issue of waterboarding, an interrogation method simulating drowning that critics call torture. He has since refused to say whether waterboarding is illegal since it is no longer used by the CIA or military interrogators.


http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5imDvIlEBNgzKdqYgIuTUEzUEImrQD90RJT080

More on Michael Mukasey:

Who Will Call for the Separation of the Synagogue of Satan and State?

Orthodox Judaic Attorney General Mukasey to Light 30′ tall Menorah on White House Lawn

More Background on Talmudic Attorney General Mukasey

U.S. Attorney General Position Goes to Talmud Adherent

Bush Nominates Kol Nidre Upholding Talmudist for Attorney General