Archive for August, 2007

Vatican 777 Live Earth Ceremony

August 29, 2007

Watch Lawrence Bender (producer of bloodfest movie, “Kill Bill”) give a Live Earth sermon at the Cathedral of Rome, St. John Lateran followed by an eerie requiem by Vatican composer Michael d’Alessandra on 7/07/07:

http://entimg.msn.com/i/ExperienceData/p1-7/us/x.htm?sh=LiveEarth&ep=le_other&ch=4

This ceremony coincided with the issuance of the motu proprio, Summorum Pontificum relating to the traditional Latin Mass also on 7/7/07. More on that here:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/06/777.html

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Vatican 777 Live Earth Ceremony

August 29, 2007

Watch Lawrence Bender (producer of bloodfest movie, “Kill Bill”) give a Live Earth sermon at the Cathedral of Rome, St. John Lateran followed by an eerie requiem by Vatican composer Michael d’Alessandra on 7/07/07:

http://entimg.msn.com/i/ExperienceData/p1-7/us/x.htm?sh=LiveEarth&ep=le_other&ch=4

This ceremony coincided with the issuance of the motu proprio, Summorum Pontificum relating to the traditional Latin Mass also on 7/7/07. More on that here:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/06/777.html

Vatican 777 Live Earth Ceremony

August 29, 2007

Watch Lawrence Bender (producer of bloodfest movie, “Kill Bill”) give a Live Earth sermon at the Cathedral of Rome, St. John Lateran followed by an eerie requiem by Vatican composer Michael d’Alessandra on 7/07/07:

http://entimg.msn.com/i/ExperienceData/p1-7/us/x.htm?sh=LiveEarth&ep=le_other&ch=4

This ceremony coincided with the issuance of the motu proprio, Summorum Pontificum relating to the traditional Latin Mass also on 7/7/07. More on that here:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/06/777.html

Vatican 777 Live Earth Ceremony

August 29, 2007

Watch Lawrence Bender (producer of bloodfest movie, “Kill Bill”) give a Live Earth sermon at the Cathedral of Rome, St. John Lateran followed by an eerie requiem by Vatican composer Michael d’Alessandra on 7/07/07:

http://entimg.msn.com/i/ExperienceData/p1-7/us/x.htm?sh=LiveEarth&ep=le_other&ch=4

This ceremony coincided with the issuance of the motu proprio, Summorum Pontificum relating to the traditional Latin Mass also on 7/7/07. More on that here:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/06/777.html

Fear of "The Jews" Prevails at Catholic DePaul University: Finkelstein Silenced

August 29, 2007

DePaul pulls plug on controversial professor

Course cancelled a week before class

By Ron Grossman | Tribune staff reporter
August 28, 2007

The required reading was at the bookstore, the students had the course syllabus, and space in Political Science 235, “Equality in Social Justice,” was standing-room only when DePaul University pulled the plug Friday on what was to have been Norman Finkelstein’s final year at the school.

A controversial scholar — accused by critics of fomenting anti-Semitism and lauded by supporters as a forthright critic of Israel — Finkelstein attracted wide attention across the academic world when he was denied tenure in the spring.

By Monday, the books for his course had been pulled from the DePaul bookstore’s shelves, while his case was restarting a firestorm of protest. The American Association of University Professors was preparing a letter to the university, protesting Finkelstein’s treatment as a serious violation of academic ethics.

Finkelstein vowed not to take the rebuff lying down — or, perhaps more correctly, to do something just like that. In addition to canceling his course, the university informed him that his office was no longer his.

“I intend to go to my office on the first day of classes and, if my way is barred, to engage in civil disobedience,” Finkelstein, 53, said in a telephone interview. “If arrested, I’ll go on a hunger strike. If released, I’ll do it all over again. I’ll fast in jail for as long as it takes.”

Fall classes start Sept. 5 at DePaul, where Finkelstein has been a faculty member for six years. During that time, his star has risen and fallen at the Catholic school, founded by the Vincentian order.

His books brought him far-reaching renown. They also were condemned for their provocative language, as in the “The Holocaust Industry,” where he called efforts to get compensation from Germany for World War II slave laborers a “shakedown.” Finkelstein, himself Jewish, has described leaders of American-Jewish organizations as “Holocaust-mongers.”

He has engaged in a long-running feud with Harvard University law professor Alan Dershowitz, a strong supporter of Israel. He has charged Dershowitz with appropriating other scholars’ findings; Dershowitz was similarly skeptical of the legitimacy of Finkelstein’s work when asked by DePaul to comment on his application for tenure, the academic equivalent of a lifetime job guarantee.

Nonetheless, Finkelstein’s work has been praised by ivory-tower luminaries such as the distinguished linguist Noam Chomsky and the late Raul Hilberg, dean of Holocaust historians. Finkelstein’s supporters are planning a lecture-rally for him in October in Chicago.

Two years ago, Finkelstein was held up as an example of DePaul’s commitment to freedom of inquiry by its president, Dennis Holtschneider.

Students have held Finkelstein in high regard, reporting that his tone in the classroom is measured, quite unlike the red-hot rhetoric of his books.

This year, though, Dean Chuck Suchar found Finkelstein’s scholarship inconsistent with “DePaul’s Vincentian values,” among them respect for others’ views. Holtschneider seconded that motion in refusing Finkelstein’s tenure.

Student support continues

DePaul officials declined to comment on the case. Denise Mattson, associate vice president for public affairs, said: “Finkelstein has been assigned to an administrative leave with full pay and benefits for the 2007-08 academic year. Administrative leave relieves professors from their teaching responsibilities. He was informed of the reasons that precipitated this leave last spring.”

He was denied tenure in June, but officials could offer no explanation for why his courses were left in the schedule.

On Friday, Andrew Riplinger, a DePaul student registered for Finkelstein’s course, received an e-mail from him.

“Professor Finkelstein wrote that if the course was canceled by the university, it would be taught at another location,” said Riplinger. “Then the university sent an e-mail announcing the course had been canceled.”

Riplinger and other student supporters, fearing such an action, have been meeting regularly over the summer and communicating their uneasiness to the administration. Their committee was scheduled to meet Monday evening in the DePaul student center, Riplinger said.

Final year at school threatened

According to the norms of academia, a professor denied tenure has the right to a final year of teaching at the university that turns him down. The watchdog of those rights is the American Association of University Professors, the umbrella organization of college teachers, which can censure a school found in violation of its ground rules. Such a finding also can be the preliminary to a lawsuit against the university by the faculty member.

According to Jonathan Knight, director of the AAUP’s program in academic freedom and tenure, a university owes a faculty member denied tenure more than just a year’s salary. He or she has the right to a classroom (and presumably an office). A university can’t simply buy him or her out by invoking administrative leave, Knight said.

He added that a faculty member can’t be put on administrative leave without a hearing except in an extreme emergency.

“We’re not aware of an emergency requiring DePaul to take such action at the 11th hour and 59th minute,” Knight said.

Finkelstein said that, rather than filing a lawsuit, he intends to fight the university’s action with a hunger strike, and the attendant publicity.

“In the court of public opinion, I can win,” Finkelstein said. “I say: ‘Let the people judge.'”

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-depaul28aug28,1,636064.story?ctrack=1&cset=true

Fear of "The Jews" Prevails at Catholic DePaul University: Finkelstein Silenced

August 29, 2007

DePaul pulls plug on controversial professor

Course cancelled a week before class

By Ron Grossman | Tribune staff reporter
August 28, 2007

The required reading was at the bookstore, the students had the course syllabus, and space in Political Science 235, “Equality in Social Justice,” was standing-room only when DePaul University pulled the plug Friday on what was to have been Norman Finkelstein’s final year at the school.

A controversial scholar — accused by critics of fomenting anti-Semitism and lauded by supporters as a forthright critic of Israel — Finkelstein attracted wide attention across the academic world when he was denied tenure in the spring.

By Monday, the books for his course had been pulled from the DePaul bookstore’s shelves, while his case was restarting a firestorm of protest. The American Association of University Professors was preparing a letter to the university, protesting Finkelstein’s treatment as a serious violation of academic ethics.

Finkelstein vowed not to take the rebuff lying down — or, perhaps more correctly, to do something just like that. In addition to canceling his course, the university informed him that his office was no longer his.

“I intend to go to my office on the first day of classes and, if my way is barred, to engage in civil disobedience,” Finkelstein, 53, said in a telephone interview. “If arrested, I’ll go on a hunger strike. If released, I’ll do it all over again. I’ll fast in jail for as long as it takes.”

Fall classes start Sept. 5 at DePaul, where Finkelstein has been a faculty member for six years. During that time, his star has risen and fallen at the Catholic school, founded by the Vincentian order.

His books brought him far-reaching renown. They also were condemned for their provocative language, as in the “The Holocaust Industry,” where he called efforts to get compensation from Germany for World War II slave laborers a “shakedown.” Finkelstein, himself Jewish, has described leaders of American-Jewish organizations as “Holocaust-mongers.”

He has engaged in a long-running feud with Harvard University law professor Alan Dershowitz, a strong supporter of Israel. He has charged Dershowitz with appropriating other scholars’ findings; Dershowitz was similarly skeptical of the legitimacy of Finkelstein’s work when asked by DePaul to comment on his application for tenure, the academic equivalent of a lifetime job guarantee.

Nonetheless, Finkelstein’s work has been praised by ivory-tower luminaries such as the distinguished linguist Noam Chomsky and the late Raul Hilberg, dean of Holocaust historians. Finkelstein’s supporters are planning a lecture-rally for him in October in Chicago.

Two years ago, Finkelstein was held up as an example of DePaul’s commitment to freedom of inquiry by its president, Dennis Holtschneider.

Students have held Finkelstein in high regard, reporting that his tone in the classroom is measured, quite unlike the red-hot rhetoric of his books.

This year, though, Dean Chuck Suchar found Finkelstein’s scholarship inconsistent with “DePaul’s Vincentian values,” among them respect for others’ views. Holtschneider seconded that motion in refusing Finkelstein’s tenure.

Student support continues

DePaul officials declined to comment on the case. Denise Mattson, associate vice president for public affairs, said: “Finkelstein has been assigned to an administrative leave with full pay and benefits for the 2007-08 academic year. Administrative leave relieves professors from their teaching responsibilities. He was informed of the reasons that precipitated this leave last spring.”

He was denied tenure in June, but officials could offer no explanation for why his courses were left in the schedule.

On Friday, Andrew Riplinger, a DePaul student registered for Finkelstein’s course, received an e-mail from him.

“Professor Finkelstein wrote that if the course was canceled by the university, it would be taught at another location,” said Riplinger. “Then the university sent an e-mail announcing the course had been canceled.”

Riplinger and other student supporters, fearing such an action, have been meeting regularly over the summer and communicating their uneasiness to the administration. Their committee was scheduled to meet Monday evening in the DePaul student center, Riplinger said.

Final year at school threatened

According to the norms of academia, a professor denied tenure has the right to a final year of teaching at the university that turns him down. The watchdog of those rights is the American Association of University Professors, the umbrella organization of college teachers, which can censure a school found in violation of its ground rules. Such a finding also can be the preliminary to a lawsuit against the university by the faculty member.

According to Jonathan Knight, director of the AAUP’s program in academic freedom and tenure, a university owes a faculty member denied tenure more than just a year’s salary. He or she has the right to a classroom (and presumably an office). A university can’t simply buy him or her out by invoking administrative leave, Knight said.

He added that a faculty member can’t be put on administrative leave without a hearing except in an extreme emergency.

“We’re not aware of an emergency requiring DePaul to take such action at the 11th hour and 59th minute,” Knight said.

Finkelstein said that, rather than filing a lawsuit, he intends to fight the university’s action with a hunger strike, and the attendant publicity.

“In the court of public opinion, I can win,” Finkelstein said. “I say: ‘Let the people judge.'”

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-depaul28aug28,1,636064.story?ctrack=1&cset=true

Benedict XVI to Meet His Blood-Drenched Elder Brother, Shimon Peres

August 29, 2007

EDITOR’S NOTE: Shimon Peres ordered the 1996 “Grapes of Wrath” brutality of Lebanon which climaxed in the massacre at the Biblical village of Qana where a UN shelter was bombed killing 102 civilians, mostly women and children. See:

The Israeli Massacre of Civilians at Qana

Massacre in Sanctuary; Eyewitness

Israeli President Peres to visit Pope

Vatican, Aug. 24, 2007 (CWNews.com) – Israel’s President Shimon Peres will visit Pope Benedict XVI (bio – news) for a private audience on September 6, Vatican sources have disclosed. The meeting will take place at the Pope’s summer residence in Castel Gandolfo.

Peres will be making his first visit with the Pontiff since assuming the Israeli presidency in July of this year. But the veteran politician is a familiar figure at the Vatican, having visited on several occasions during his years as Israel’s foreign minister and prime minister.

In April 2006, Peres– who at the time held no government leadership position, although he remained prominent in Israeli politics– spoke at length with Pope Benedict during a visit to Rome. Their conversation was dominated by two topics: the prospects for peace in the Middle East, and the stalled negotiations toward a final juridical-economic pact establishing the rights of the Church in Israel.

Pope Benedict met with the previous Israeli president, Moshe Katsav, in November 2005. During that visit the Israeli leader issued a formal invitation for the Pope to visit the Holy Land. The Pontiff responded positively to that invitation, but no date was set for a trip. Informed sources indicate that a papal trip is not likely to take place until the successful completion of negotiations toward a final diplomatic pact.

http://www.cwnews.com/news/viewstory.cfm?recnum=53106

Benedict XVI to Meet His Blood-Drenched Elder Brother, Shimon Peres

August 29, 2007

EDITOR’S NOTE: Shimon Peres ordered the 1996 “Grapes of Wrath” brutality of Lebanon which climaxed in the massacre at the Biblical village of Qana where a UN shelter was bombed killing 102 civilians, mostly women and children. See:

The Israeli Massacre of Civilians at Qana

Massacre in Sanctuary; Eyewitness

Israeli President Peres to visit Pope

Vatican, Aug. 24, 2007 (CWNews.com) – Israel’s President Shimon Peres will visit Pope Benedict XVI (bio – news) for a private audience on September 6, Vatican sources have disclosed. The meeting will take place at the Pope’s summer residence in Castel Gandolfo.

Peres will be making his first visit with the Pontiff since assuming the Israeli presidency in July of this year. But the veteran politician is a familiar figure at the Vatican, having visited on several occasions during his years as Israel’s foreign minister and prime minister.

In April 2006, Peres– who at the time held no government leadership position, although he remained prominent in Israeli politics– spoke at length with Pope Benedict during a visit to Rome. Their conversation was dominated by two topics: the prospects for peace in the Middle East, and the stalled negotiations toward a final juridical-economic pact establishing the rights of the Church in Israel.

Pope Benedict met with the previous Israeli president, Moshe Katsav, in November 2005. During that visit the Israeli leader issued a formal invitation for the Pope to visit the Holy Land. The Pontiff responded positively to that invitation, but no date was set for a trip. Informed sources indicate that a papal trip is not likely to take place until the successful completion of negotiations toward a final diplomatic pact.

http://www.cwnews.com/news/viewstory.cfm?recnum=53106

Poland’s "Catholic" B’nai Noach

August 28, 2007

‘My personal Atlantis’

By Goel Pinto

Haaretz

Janusz Makuch is visibly moved when he talks about the opening show he is planning for next year’s Festival of Jewish Culture, to be held in Krakow. He fantasizes and gesticulates like a performer acting out a play, and his English is peppered with Yiddish and Hebrew words. He repeats the phrase “with God’s help” in a thick Polish accent and with a frequency typical of traditional Jewish Israelis.

For next year’s festival, he envisions two enormous stages: One in Jerusalem on a slope adjoining the Old City walls, and another in the central square in Kazimierz, Krakow’s old Jewish quarter. Giant screens will facilitate communication between both stages. The evening will open with the sounds of three cantors and a choir in Jerusalem singing to Krakow. Singers and cantors in Poland will respond.

“The entire evening will be a message to the world,” he says. “The whole world will be able to view the dialogue, the bridge that will open between Poland and Israel, between Jew and non-Jew. It’s a crazy concept, I know, but I will do it” …

“In my opinion, the seminars and lectures are the most important feature of the festival,” he says. “Imagine a week-long workshop in an ancient synagogue in which two Jewish women from Warsaw teach 50 Polish children and their Catholic, Polish mothers about Passover, Rosh Hashanah and even Shavuot. As far as I am concerned, that is the goal: To teach children to maintain an open approach to the world in general and the Jewish world in particular in the hope that they will become pluralistic citizens when they grow up” …

When Makuch speaks of “we,” the Jews, as opposed to “them,” the non-Jews, and employs the Hebrew word for soul, neshama, to express his real connection to Jewish culture, one might mistakenly assume that he is Jewish. But he comes from a Catholic family and is married to a Catholic who serves as the chief editor of a major publishing house in Poland …

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/897586.html

Poland’s "Catholic" B’nai Noach

August 28, 2007

‘My personal Atlantis’

By Goel Pinto

Haaretz

Janusz Makuch is visibly moved when he talks about the opening show he is planning for next year’s Festival of Jewish Culture, to be held in Krakow. He fantasizes and gesticulates like a performer acting out a play, and his English is peppered with Yiddish and Hebrew words. He repeats the phrase “with God’s help” in a thick Polish accent and with a frequency typical of traditional Jewish Israelis.

For next year’s festival, he envisions two enormous stages: One in Jerusalem on a slope adjoining the Old City walls, and another in the central square in Kazimierz, Krakow’s old Jewish quarter. Giant screens will facilitate communication between both stages. The evening will open with the sounds of three cantors and a choir in Jerusalem singing to Krakow. Singers and cantors in Poland will respond.

“The entire evening will be a message to the world,” he says. “The whole world will be able to view the dialogue, the bridge that will open between Poland and Israel, between Jew and non-Jew. It’s a crazy concept, I know, but I will do it” …

“In my opinion, the seminars and lectures are the most important feature of the festival,” he says. “Imagine a week-long workshop in an ancient synagogue in which two Jewish women from Warsaw teach 50 Polish children and their Catholic, Polish mothers about Passover, Rosh Hashanah and even Shavuot. As far as I am concerned, that is the goal: To teach children to maintain an open approach to the world in general and the Jewish world in particular in the hope that they will become pluralistic citizens when they grow up” …

When Makuch speaks of “we,” the Jews, as opposed to “them,” the non-Jews, and employs the Hebrew word for soul, neshama, to express his real connection to Jewish culture, one might mistakenly assume that he is Jewish. But he comes from a Catholic family and is married to a Catholic who serves as the chief editor of a major publishing house in Poland …

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/897586.html